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Old January 24th 05, 02:50 PM
 
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Default ideas for covering cement floor in workshop

I just had a workshop (14*21 w/ hi ceilings) built that is attached to
the back of my garage. Walls and ceiling are insulated with drywall
attached. The concrete floor is 8 inches thick. I have heat in the
workshop. Now I need to cover the cement slab with something that is
easy, quick and inexpensive, but will help prevent the cold from coming
thru the floor. The workshop will be used for all kinds of projects,
but specifically wood-related projects. I am thinking about putting
down a grid of 2x4's, then filling in with styrofoam insulation and
then covering with plywood or equivalent (plywood is expensive). how
thick should the plywood be and do I need anything on top of it or can
I use it as is. thanks for any ideas.


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Old January 24th 05, 03:41 PM
Junkyard Engineer
 
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it depends on where you are. If you have heat and you have good insulation,
you don't need anything on the cement slab. I'm in Canada. It's -25 Celsius
for 2 or 3 weeks now and working in the garage (similar dimension as yours
with high ceiling) is not a problem. Furthermore, I don't know how you would
manage with heavy equipment on soft wood like plywood on the ground ? I've
layed down vinyl rough finished commercial flooring (from any home
improvement store, about 1$C/sq.ft.) and it gives me a good surface to work,
really easy to clean and not slippery.


a écrit dans le message de news:
...
I just had a workshop (14*21 w/ hi ceilings) built that is attached to
the back of my garage. Walls and ceiling are insulated with drywall
attached. The concrete floor is 8 inches thick. I have heat in the
workshop. Now I need to cover the cement slab with something that is
easy, quick and inexpensive, but will help prevent the cold from coming
thru the floor. The workshop will be used for all kinds of projects,
but specifically wood-related projects. I am thinking about putting
down a grid of 2x4's, then filling in with styrofoam insulation and
then covering with plywood or equivalent (plywood is expensive). how
thick should the plywood be and do I need anything on top of it or can
I use it as is. thanks for any ideas.



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Old January 24th 05, 04:18 PM
Fred
 
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I am looking at two different possibilities for covering the cement floor in
my shop (similar size). They are a product called DeltaFL, comes in roll
form and panels, then cover with ply. Their web sites lists distributors.
http://www.cosella-doerken.com/deltafl/index.html

And also a product called DriCore, available at the Home Depot (a similar
product is now also available at Lowe's). Here is a link for this item:
http://www.dricore.com/en/eindex.htm .

Hope this is of some help.

Regards,
Fred Bearman
Port Huron, Michigan

wrote in message
ups.com...
I just had a workshop (14*21 w/ hi ceilings) built that is attached to
the back of my garage. Walls and ceiling are insulated with drywall
attached. The concrete floor is 8 inches thick. I have heat in the
workshop. Now I need to cover the cement slab with something that is
easy, quick and inexpensive, but will help prevent the cold from coming
thru the floor. The workshop will be used for all kinds of projects,
but specifically wood-related projects. I am thinking about putting
down a grid of 2x4's, then filling in with styrofoam insulation and
then covering with plywood or equivalent (plywood is expensive). how
thick should the plywood be and do I need anything on top of it or can
I use it as is. thanks for any ideas.





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Old January 24th 05, 04:40 PM
Stephen M
 
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Seal the concrete with a penetrating liquid and/or plastic sheet. Lay
down tubafour sleepers (12 or 16 inch centers depending upon weight of
machinery) with insulation between. 5/8 or 3/4 T&G OSB atop that.


No No No. OSB will support you but you will have A b*tch of a time sweeping
up sawdist It's just not smooth enough. I have 3/4" T&G A/C plywood over 16"
centers painted with two coats of oil-based enamel deck/floor paint. The
paint makes the floor *much* more sweepable.

A
light color primer to enhance the lighting.


I found the basic gray to be too dark, so I bought a can of white and a can
of gray and mixed them.

-Steve


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Old January 24th 05, 05:12 PM
Charlie Self
 
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patliz1 asks:


I just had a workshop (14*21 w/ hi ceilings) built that is attached to
the back of my garage. Walls and ceiling are insulated with drywall
attached. The concrete floor is 8 inches thick. I have heat in the
workshop. Now I need to cover the cement slab with something that is
easy, quick and inexpensive, but will help prevent the cold from coming
thru the floor. The workshop will be used for all kinds of projects,
but specifically wood-related projects. I am thinking about putting
down a grid of 2x4's, then filling in with styrofoam insulation and
then covering with plywood or equivalent (plywood is expensive). how
thick should the plywood be and do I need anything on top of it or can
I use it as is.


Plywood works. I'd make the grid so it has 16" OC sections. Insulate with blown
in insulation, which is lots cheaper than styrofoam, and you do not need
excessive R values underneath your feet. I did that on a porch we enclosed a
decade or more ago. Works fine.

If 3/4" t&g plywood is too pricey, you've got a couple solutions. One, OSB in
3/4" thickness, covered with SYP boards. Get a second grade Southern yellow
pine flooring. It will outlast almost anything. Or you can go with 5/8" thick
OSB (I don't like this one), and come back over it with 1/2" sanded plywood.
Not as strong, but it will do. I did my shop floor with rough poplar 1" 1x6
boards at a 45 deg. angle to my joists, then covered that with 3/4" t&g. I
painted the plywood. I have a buddy who polyurethaned his. His method was
simple: get a roller with a long handle, pour the poly on the floor, and spread
it, leaving it fairly thick. Do the same twice more over a period of about 2
weeks. Looks great after 13 or 14 years of heavy use. My paint looks like hell
a week after it is repainted.



Charlie Self
"They want the federal government controlling Social Security like it's some
kind of federal program." George W. Bush, St. Charles, Missouri, November 2,
2000
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Old January 24th 05, 05:51 PM
Mike in Arkansas
 
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Mine is covered with a mixture of glue drips, paint, varnish, assorted
oils and a little blood. A nice verigated pattern with interesting
texture.

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Old January 24th 05, 06:02 PM
jo4hn
 
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Stephen M wrote:

Seal the concrete with a penetrating liquid and/or plastic sheet. Lay
down tubafour sleepers (12 or 16 inch centers depending upon weight of
machinery) with insulation between. 5/8 or 3/4 T&G OSB atop that.



No No No. OSB will support you but you will have A b*tch of a time sweeping
up sawdist It's just not smooth enough. I have 3/4" T&G A/C plywood over 16"
centers painted with two coats of oil-based enamel deck/floor paint. The
paint makes the floor *much* more sweepable.


Sorry. Didn't make myself clear that the paint was also there to seal
(and smooth) the surface. That is what is in my shop, and although I
vacuum rather than sweep usually, it cleans up well.


A
light color primer to enhance the lighting.



I found the basic gray to be too dark, so I bought a can of white and a can
of gray and mixed them.

-Steve


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Old January 24th 05, 07:05 PM
Tom
 
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Patliz wrote:I just had a workshop (14*21 w/ hi ceilings) built that is
attached to
the back of my garage. Walls and ceiling are insulated with drywall
attached. The concrete floor is 8 inches thick. I have heat in the
workshop. Now I need to cover the cement slab with something that is
easy, quick and inexpensive, but will help prevent the cold from coming
thru the floor. The workshop will be used for all kinds of projects,
but specifically wood-related projects. I am thinking about putting
down a grid of 2x4's, then filling in with styrofoam insulation and
then covering with plywood or equivalent (plywood is expensive). how
thick should the plywood be and do I need anything on top of it or can
I use it as is. thanks for any ideas.

Good idea. How tight your grid is may determine desired ply thickness, but I'd
still go with 3/4 sanded one side, nothing on top. Tom
Work at your leisure!


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