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Old January 12th 19, 08:54 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Larry Kraus wrote:

A simple pitch gauge takes up much less space and is a lot cheaper.

See
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...ds=pitch+gauge


I ordered one of those tonight. I'll keep my eyes open for the
right tap and die set. "Hanson" apparently was a recommended
brand. Looks like "Irwin" may have bought it up. Handmade tap
and die wrenches might make satisfying projects...though that's
probably the sort of project that may be most successful when you
have a working example (and/or specifications) in front of you.

Another project I have, and have had for a number of years,
involves bending 1/2"x1/8"cold steel bar into a circular shape
about 12" in diameter, and then a 2nd piece of the same material
which wraps snugly around the first piece. Since I only need
these 2 pieces I don't intend to buy new tooling for it. I hope
that a homemade "wooden anvil" of the right curvature may work.
I actually already bought a small tap and tap wrench for this
project. The 2nd piece shows up very well in the following
picture (if you click on it, it will play a video).

http://bell.20m.com/banjosrelicpage.html



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Old January 13th 19, 07:40 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2019 03:54:35 -0500, Bill wrote:

Larry Kraus wrote:

A simple pitch gauge takes up much less space and is a lot cheaper.

See
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...ds=pitch+gauge


I ordered one of those tonight. I'll keep my eyes open for the
right tap and die set. "Hanson" apparently was a recommended
brand. Looks like "Irwin" may have bought it up. Handmade tap
and die wrenches might make satisfying projects...though that's
probably the sort of project that may be most successful when you
have a working example (and/or specifications) in front of you.

Another project I have, and have had for a number of years,
involves bending 1/2"x1/8"cold steel bar into a circular shape
about 12" in diameter, and then a 2nd piece of the same material
which wraps snugly around the first piece. Since I only need
these 2 pieces I don't intend to buy new tooling for it. I hope
that a homemade "wooden anvil" of the right curvature may work.
I actually already bought a small tap and tap wrench for this
project. The 2nd piece shows up very well in the following
picture (if you click on it, it will play a video).

http://bell.20m.com/banjosrelicpage.html

Bodge up a roll former. 2 fiixed rollers and a moveable one that you
just run the material back and forth through, tightening the moveable
roller as you go untill you get the radius you need.
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Old January 14th 19, 12:57 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Clare Snyder wrote:

Bodge up a roll former. 2 fiixed rollers and a moveable one that you
just run the material back and forth through, tightening the moveable
roller as you go untill you get the radius you need.



I thought of trying that. Wood rollers okay? If I make them like
"spools" of the right width, I might even end up with concentric
rings that lay flat. I bought enough material (soft steel) to
allow me at least one mistake, and of course, I can always buy
more. I already have the Oak hoop and the calf skin. Any
difference between the suitability of soft maple versus hard
maple for the neck? I suppose, besides work-ability, the main
issue is the resistance to any twisting and turning. More than 10
years ago, when I started this project, increasingly aware of how
little I knew about woodworking, I was better-versed in the
details. That's when I switched from reading rec.banjomaking to
rec.woodworking. The former may not be very active anymore.
I can think up projects for myself faster than I can do them...
When I started, I didn't even have a house with a yard to mow!
This spring, I'm planning to powerwash and restain the
deck--hopefully, that's only "two weekends" : )

Bill



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Old January 14th 19, 03:35 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 19:57:01 -0500, Bill wrote:

When I started, I didn't even have a house with a yard to mow!
This spring, I'm planning to powerwash and restain the
deck--hopefully, that's only "two weekends" : )

Bill, I suggest that before you use a power washer on a wooden deck that you
check it out on an inconspicuous place. A high pressure water jet can do bad
things to wood.
--
Jerry O.
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Old January 14th 19, 03:55 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 19:57:01 -0500, Bill wrote:

Clare Snyder wrote:

Bodge up a roll former. 2 fiixed rollers and a moveable one that you
just run the material back and forth through, tightening the moveable
roller as you go untill you get the radius you need.



I thought of trying that. Wood rollers okay? If I make them like
"spools" of the right width, I might even end up with concentric
rings that lay flat. I bought enough material (soft steel) to
allow me at least one mistake, and of course, I can always buy
more. I already have the Oak hoop and the calf skin. Any
difference between the suitability of soft maple versus hard
maple for the neck? I suppose, besides work-ability, the main
issue is the resistance to any twisting and turning. More than 10
years ago, when I started this project, increasingly aware of how
little I knew about woodworking, I was better-versed in the
details. That's when I switched from reading rec.banjomaking to
rec.woodworking. The former may not be very active anymore.
I can think up projects for myself faster than I can do them...
When I started, I didn't even have a house with a yard to mow!
This spring, I'm planning to powerwash and restain the
deck--hopefully, that's only "two weekends" : )

Bill


A set of ball bearings will work better. I've seen it done with a
vice. Bolt a plate with 2 bearings to one jaw, and 1 bearing to the
other jaw. Bearings running horizontally - You could use hardwood
blocks - 2X2 oak for instance, with bearings bolted through one
way,and jaw-bolts the other direction. Pull the metal through,
crankthe vise 1/4 turn orwhatever, and pull through again - repeat
untill you have your hoop.
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Old January 14th 19, 04:10 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Jerry Osage wrote:
On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 19:57:01 -0500, Bill wrote:

When I started, I didn't even have a house with a yard to mow!
This spring, I'm planning to powerwash and restain the
deck--hopefully, that's only "two weekends" : )

Bill, I suggest that before you use a power washer on a wooden deck that you
check it out on an inconspicuous place. A high pressure water jet can do bad
things to wood.


I have to powerspray the porous decking floor of the deck and the
many wooden slats that make up the fence around it. I have read
to start at 8-12" away on the deck. I didn't realize the wood was
so vulnerable too (but I will keep your caution in mind)! While
look at a copy of "Consumer Reports", I noted that they evaluated
the way the stain looked after 1, 2, and 3 years. Heck, I haven't
re-stained mine (ever) in 9 years, so I'm expected a big
improvement! I used inexpensive "deck cleaner" with a brush
once, but I wasn't overly-impressed with the results--it looked
cleaner when I was through, but I sensed that I may as well have
been using water. I am expecting significant before/after
results this time, so I am sort of looking forward to getting on
with it.

Bill


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Old January 14th 19, 06:39 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 19:57:01 -0500, Bill wrote:

Clare Snyder wrote:

Bodge up a roll former. 2 fiixed rollers and a moveable one that you
just run the material back and forth through, tightening the moveable
roller as you go untill you get the radius you need.



I thought of trying that. Wood rollers okay? If I make them like
"spools" of the right width, I might even end up with concentric
rings that lay flat. I bought enough material (soft steel) to
allow me at least one mistake, and of course, I can always buy
more. I already have the Oak hoop and the calf skin. Any
difference between the suitability of soft maple versus hard
maple for the neck? I suppose, besides work-ability, the main
issue is the resistance to any twisting and turning. More than 10
years ago, when I started this project, increasingly aware of how
little I knew about woodworking, I was better-versed in the
details. That's when I switched from reading rec.banjomaking to
rec.woodworking. The former may not be very active anymore.
I can think up projects for myself faster than I can do them...
When I started, I didn't even have a house with a yard to mow!
This spring, I'm planning to powerwash and restain the
deck--hopefully, that's only "two weekends" : )

Bill


A set of ball bearings will work better. I've seen it done with a
vice. Bolt a plate with 2 bearings to one jaw, and 1 bearing to the
other jaw. Bearings running horizontally - You could use hardwood
blocks - 2X2 oak for instance, with bearings bolted through one
way,and jaw-bolts the other direction. Pull the metal through,
crankthe vise 1/4 turn orwhatever, and pull through again - repeat
untill you have your hoop.


I made some sketches, and got it right on the 3rd try! It seems
like a very good idea! I'll let you know about how it goes.
Thank you!

Bill
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Old January 14th 19, 06:48 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Clare Snyder wrote:

Just don't get too close. I did my old cedar deck numerour times -
as well as the PT SYP. It DOES accentuate the grain, particularly when
used after soaking it with bleach.


I'm guessing you dilute the bleach by about 4 or 5 (or more?)
parts water to 1 part bleach, and let that work for say 10
minutes. Am I on the right track?


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