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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

I have power to the SawStop now and thought I would test the smoothness.

After multiple tries I finally stood a quarter, not a nickel,on it's
edge on the table top. To be on the side of caution I placed the
quarter opposite the miter slot from the blade in the event the quarter
decided to roll in towards the blade... That was unnecessary.

A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this
other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting
movie adventure.

STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.
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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

Leon wrote:
I have power to the SawStop now and thought I would test the smoothness.

After multiple tries I finally stood a quarter, not a nickel,on it's
edge on the table top. To be on the side of caution I placed the
quarter opposite the miter slot from the blade in the event the quarter
decided to roll in towards the blade... That was unnecessary.

A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this
other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting
movie adventure.

STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


If I were to buy a SawStop I would have to borrow a quarter to try this!
Sounds like a nice machine.

--
 GW Ross 

 In nature, there are no rewards or 
 punishments, only consequences. 






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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/27/2013 2:15 PM, G. Ross wrote:
Leon wrote:
I have power to the SawStop now and thought I would test the smoothness.

After multiple tries I finally stood a quarter, not a nickel,on it's
edge on the table top. To be on the side of caution I placed the
quarter opposite the miter slot from the blade in the event the quarter
decided to roll in towards the blade... That was unnecessary.

A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this
other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting
movie adventure.

STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


If I were to buy a SawStop I would have to borrow a quarter to try this!
Sounds like a nice machine.



I was thinking that was my last quarter. LOL You could probably swing
a secret deal where the store gives you back a quarter if you buy one. ;~)

So far I am very happy with it.
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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny

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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/27/2013 4:42 PM, Sonny wrote:
On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny



I have not been able to find it lately, seems like it did. Ill have to
take another look. Seems like you could upload 2 per month for free.


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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/27/2013 4:42 PM, Sonny wrote:
On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny



Done Deal!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb1121...in/photostream
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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/27/2013 6:34 PM, Leon wrote:
On 4/27/2013 4:42 PM, Sonny wrote:
On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show
this other than toit to you if you would like to see this
exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny



I have not been able to find it lately, seems like it did. Ill have to
take another look. Seems like you could upload 2 per month for free.

Yea, but why use that when You Tube is the standard.


Jeff
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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/27/2013 6:24 PM, woodchucker wrote:
On 4/27/2013 6:34 PM, Leon wrote:
On 4/27/2013 4:42 PM, Sonny wrote:
On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show
this other than toit to you if you would like to see this
exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.

Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny



I have not been able to find it lately, seems like it did. Ill have to
take another look. Seems like you could upload 2 per month for free.

Yea, but why use that when You Tube is the standard.


Jeff



Because I seldom post a video and prefer to keep all my pictures and
videos in the same place.
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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/27/13 5:38 PM, Leon wrote:
On 4/27/2013 4:42 PM, Sonny wrote:
On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show
this other than to email it to you if you would like to see this
exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny



Done Deal!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb1121...in/photostream



Next time turn your phone sideways.
It's called "widescreen," not highscreen. :-)


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
http://mikedrums.com

---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply

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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

Leon wrote:
On 4/27/2013 4:42 PM, Sonny wrote:
On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show
this other than to email it to you if you would like to see this
exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny



Done Deal!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb1121...in/photostream


I enjoyed it, but would have preferred a longer video!

Bill




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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On Sat, 27 Apr 2013 13:11:57 -0500, Leon wrote:

I have power to the SawStop now and thought I would test the smoothness.

After multiple tries I finally stood a quarter, not a nickel,on it's
edge on the table top. To be on the side of caution I placed the
quarter opposite the miter slot from the blade in the event the quarter
decided to roll in towards the blade... That was unnecessary.

A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this
other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting
movie adventure.

STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Leon, I appreciate you posting the details of your Sawstop,

I am going to upgrade later in the year and had already decided
on the Sawstop, just not which model.

Right now I'm using a 1951 delta contractors saw that has had a motor
upgrade but still has the original bump and hope fence.
The move to a Sawstop would be a giant leap for me.

I would like to hear feed back on the Sawstops fence rigidity and
repeatability, after you have ran it awhile.

basilisk
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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/28/2013 10:49 AM, basilisk wrote:
On Sat, 27 Apr 2013 13:11:57 -0500, Leon wrote:

I have power to the SawStop now and thought I would test the smoothness.

After multiple tries I finally stood a quarter, not a nickel,on it's
edge on the table top. To be on the side of caution I placed the
quarter opposite the miter slot from the blade in the event the quarter
decided to roll in towards the blade... That was unnecessary.

A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this
other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting
movie adventure.

STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Leon, I appreciate you posting the details of your Sawstop,

I am going to upgrade later in the year and had already decided
on the Sawstop, just not which model.

Right now I'm using a 1951 delta contractors saw that has had a motor
upgrade but still has the original bump and hope fence.
The move to a Sawstop would be a giant leap for me.

I would like to hear feed back on the Sawstops fence rigidity and
repeatability, after you have ran it awhile.

basilisk



Well thank you! I appreciate your expressing your appreciation. It has
been a lot of fun and work.

A point to ponder..

For me personally I wanted the additional safety, first and foremost.
That was the single reason for upgrading. I had a Jet cabinet saw that
I was perfectly happy with and really did buy it with the intention of
it being my last table saw purchase.

To get that upgrade in safety I knew that it would be expensive.
Ultimately I would be spending a lot of money for a feature that I hoped
I would never need. I am fortunate in that I can afford this expense
and to additionally afford some extras that I will be able to use and
appreciate on a daily basis.

Coming from a contractors saw, which does not have the t-square Bies
style fence, I am sure you will be delighted with the Professional
version of the SawStop. It is a true cabinet saw and is available with
a 3hp motor and the t-square type fence. Having previously had a
cabinet saw, I felt that the Professional version would have been a
lateral move for me, discounting the safety features. So I opted to go
with the heavier and larger Industrial version of the SawStop.

First impression of the SawStop t-square "T Glide" fence is that, other
than color, it is a very close copy of the Biesemeyer fence. It too
uses a laminate covered Baltic Birch type material for the faces of the
fence.

I am not sure what experience you have with this style fence but my
impression is that they all are so simple that they are virtually fool
proof and extremely easy to readjust should that ever need to be redone.
The only finicky part when mounting the fence system on the saw is
that you insure that the front and back "L" angle rails be bolted on as
close to parallel to the table top as possible. Actually I eye balled
that adjustment and that is good enough. The purpose to being parallel
to the table top is so that the fence will not be too high or too low to
the table surface from one of the saw to the other.
All adjustments for calibration should take you about 10 minutes if you
are anal about it. ;~)

I adjusted my fence for it to be parallel to the blade and used my
finger to feel the fence in relation to the miter slot.

Now you will need a ruler for the next step, adjusting the cursor to the
front rail rule. I set the fence to 2" made a cut, measured the result
with a caliper and adjusted the cursor to offset that amount. Next test
cut resulted in being within .007" of being what I was looking for.
That is plenty good enough.

I am certain that I will have no accuracy issues but If I do rest
assured I'll bring them up.

These type fences are rigid and easily repeatable to say 1/128". I used
the right side of my Jet t-square style fence as an adjustable stop for
panels that I used to cut biscuit slots and now cut mortises for
domino's. Accuracy has not ever been an issue.

When the time comes feel free to ask more If you need any insider
information.


Hope this helps.




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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

You know, it just dawned on me that I neglected my obligation to you as
a friend and fellow woodworking upon hearing your news and seeing those
pictures. I apologize and hope you will allow me the opportunity to
rectify that oversight now....

You suck and I hate you.

:-)


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
http://mikedrums.com

---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply

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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On Sun, 28 Apr 2013 13:05:02 -0500, Leon wrote:

On 4/28/2013 10:49 AM, basilisk wrote:
On Sat, 27 Apr 2013 13:11:57 -0500, Leon wrote:

I have power to the SawStop now and thought I would test the
smoothness.

After multiple tries I finally stood a quarter, not a nickel,on it's
edge on the table top. To be on the side of caution I placed the
quarter opposite the miter slot from the blade in the event the
quarter decided to roll in towards the blade... That was unnecessary.

A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show this
other than to email it to you if you would like to see this exciting
movie adventure.

STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Leon, I appreciate you posting the details of your Sawstop,

I am going to upgrade later in the year and had already decided on the
Sawstop, just not which model.

Right now I'm using a 1951 delta contractors saw that has had a motor
upgrade but still has the original bump and hope fence.
The move to a Sawstop would be a giant leap for me.

I would like to hear feed back on the Sawstops fence rigidity and
repeatability, after you have ran it awhile.

basilisk



Well thank you! I appreciate your expressing your appreciation. It has
been a lot of fun and work.

A point to ponder..

For me personally I wanted the additional safety, first and foremost.
That was the single reason for upgrading. I had a Jet cabinet saw that
I was perfectly happy with and really did buy it with the intention of
it being my last table saw purchase.


Safety is my motivation as well, I have worked since 1984 in various
woodworking industries and I still have all ten, I hope to keep it that
way. It would be a shame to spend all those years in industry and lose
a bunch of fingers at home in my waning years.

To get that upgrade in safety I knew that it would be expensive.
Ultimately I would be spending a lot of money for a feature that I hoped
I would never need. I am fortunate in that I can afford this expense
and to additionally afford some extras that I will be able to use and
appreciate on a daily basis.

Coming from a contractors saw, which does not have the t-square Bies
style fence, I am sure you will be delighted with the Professional
version of the SawStop. It is a true cabinet saw and is available with
a 3hp motor and the t-square type fence. Having previously had a
cabinet saw, I felt that the Professional version would have been a
lateral move for me, discounting the safety features. So I opted to go
with the heavier and larger Industrial version of the SawStop.

First impression of the SawStop t-square "T Glide" fence is that, other
than color, it is a very close copy of the Biesemeyer fence. It too
uses a laminate covered Baltic Birch type material for the faces of the
fence.

I am not sure what experience you have with this style fence but my
impression is that they all are so simple that they are virtually fool
proof and extremely easy to readjust should that ever need to be redone.
The only finicky part when mounting the fence system on the saw is
that you insure that the front and back "L" angle rails be bolted on as
close to parallel to the table top as possible. Actually I eye balled
that adjustment and that is good enough. The purpose to being parallel
to the table top is so that the fence will not be too high or too low to
the table surface from one of the saw to the other.
All adjustments for calibration should take you about 10 minutes if you
are anal about it. ;~)


I have used others T-fence saws, but not long enough to develope
confidence in their accuracy, this is just a experience thing and will
cure itself.

I adjusted my fence for it to be parallel to the blade and used my
finger to feel the fence in relation to the miter slot.

Now you will need a ruler for the next step, adjusting the cursor to the
front rail rule. I set the fence to 2" made a cut, measured the result
with a caliper and adjusted the cursor to offset that amount. Next test
cut resulted in being within .007" of being what I was looking for. That
is plenty good enough.


Absolutely

I am certain that I will have no accuracy issues but If I do rest
assured I'll bring them up.

These type fences are rigid and easily repeatable to say 1/128". I used
the right side of my Jet t-square style fence as an adjustable stop for
panels that I used to cut biscuit slots and now cut mortises for
domino's. Accuracy has not ever been an issue.

When the time comes feel free to ask more If you need any insider
information.


Hope this helps.


Very much, Thanks

basilisk

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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

-MIKE- wrote:
You know, it just dawned on me that I neglected my obligation to you as
a friend and fellow woodworking upon hearing your news and seeing those
pictures. I apologize and hope you will allow me the opportunity to
rectify that oversight now....

You suck and I hate you.

:-)


+1

--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)


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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/28/2013 1:12 PM, -MIKE- wrote:
You know, it just dawned on me that I neglected my obligation to you as
a friend and fellow woodworking upon hearing your news and seeing those
pictures. I apologize and hope you will allow me the opportunity to
rectify that oversight now....

You suck and I hate you.

:-)



;~) Better late than never!
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Default Rain Drops

Looks like Houston got hit pretty good.

How did you folks fare?

Lew



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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel



I would like to hear feed back on the Sawstops fence rigidity and

repeatability, after you have ran it awhile.



basilisk


Set it and forget it.

I dialed mine into just a few thousandths of perfect. I never noticed any problem. Checked it once lately after more than a year and was still pretty much where I left it. I am very careful with it but I have a cabinet maker using it too and he jambs all kinds of big stuff through it.

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"Lew Hodgett" wrote:
Looks like Houston got hit pretty good.

How did you folks fare?

Lew


Typical flash flooding in the streets. Some areas got 5~7 inches in fewer
hours.. Swingman's street flooded but that is not unusual and his house
sets considerably higher than the street, by design. He is in side the
Loop. I am out side the loop about 20 miles west, got 2.5" over 5 hours
and hardly saw any water in the streets at all.
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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/27/2013 6:38 PM, Leon wrote:
On 4/27/2013 4:42 PM, Sonny wrote:
On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show
this other than to email it to you if you would like to see this
exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.


Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny



Done Deal!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb1121...in/photostream


Jeez. I'd be afraid to have a tool like that. It would be just too
damned obvious that any flaws in the work were my own fault.


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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On 4/29/2013 8:39 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:
On 4/27/2013 6:38 PM, Leon wrote:
On 4/27/2013 4:42 PM, Sonny wrote:
On Saturday, April 27, 2013 1:11:57 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
A 3 meg .mov file posted on ABPW. I don't know how else to show
this other than to email it to you if you would like to see this
exciting movie adventure. STARING the SawStop, me and my quarter.

Doesn't Flickr have movie upload capability?

Sonny



Done Deal!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb1121...in/photostream


Jeez. I'd be afraid to have a tool like that. It would be just too
damned obvious that any flaws in the work were my own fault.


We all make mistakes. It is all in how well you disguise them. ;~)

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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On Apr 28, 11:15*pm, Swingman wrote:
-MIKE- wrote:
You know, it just dawned on me that I neglected my obligation to you as
a friend and fellow woodworking upon hearing your news and seeing those
pictures. *I apologize and hope you will allow me the opportunity to
rectify that oversight now....


You suck and I hate you.


:-)


+1


+2

You know, I put a whole dollar on edge once on one of my saws and no
one seemed a bit impressed. A buck! Think how much thinner tat is
than a quarter...

Oh well...

Nice stuff, Leon. Can't wait to get back the reports after the first
priject is underway.

Robert

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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message
eb.com...

Looks like Houston got hit pretty good.

How did you folks fare?

Lew
Rain??? what is that? South central Colorado. Canon city. WW

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On 4/29/2013 12:13 PM, WW wrote:


"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message
eb.com...

Looks like Houston got hit pretty good.

How did you folks fare?

Lew
Rain??? what is that? South central Colorado. Canon city. WW



Rain is what is at the bottom of your deep trench. :~)
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"WW" wrote in message ...

Rain??? what is that? South central Colorado. Canon city. WW


I know it rained there July 11, 2011... got wet while riding my bicycle
through there with my son on our trip from La Junta, CO to Pasco, WA....
Judging by what I saw of that area I'd think days like that would be
memorable.... it was clearly VERY dry there normally!


John




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Default The Quarter Test,,,,, Screw the big fat nickel

On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 08:56:44 -0500, Leon [email protected]
Jeez. I'd be afraid to have a tool like that. It would be just too
damned obvious that any flaws in the work were my own fault.


We all make mistakes. It is all in how well you disguise them. ;~)


Agreed! The first order of business when making a mistake is if you
can't fix it without scrapping the whole project, find way to make the
mistake into a design element.
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"Leon" wrote:


Typical flash flooding in the streets. Some areas got 5~7 inches in
fewer
hours.. Swingman's street flooded but that is not unusual and his
house
sets considerably higher than the street, by design. He is in side
the
Loop. I am out side the loop about 20 miles west, got 2.5" over 5
hours
and hardly saw any water in the streets at all.


--------------------------------------------------------------
No harm, no foul.

Glad to see damage was limited.

To bad, but it appears about the only good thing that happens
in urban areas is that heavy rainfall clears the streets before
finding the drains.

If some type system existed to capture heavy rains and send them
back to the aquifer, it would eliminate a lot of water rights fights.

Lew



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"Lew Hodgett" wrote:
"Leon" wrote:


Typical flash flooding in the streets. Some areas got 5~7 inches in
fewer
hours.. Swingman's street flooded but that is not unusual and his
house
sets considerably higher than the street, by design. He is in side
the
Loop. I am out side the loop about 20 miles west, got 2.5" over 5
hours
and hardly saw any water in the streets at all.


--------------------------------------------------------------
No harm, no foul.

Glad to see damage was limited.

To bad, but it appears about the only good thing that happens
in urban areas is that heavy rainfall clears the streets before
finding the drains.

If some type system existed to capture heavy rains and send them
back to the aquifer, it would eliminate a lot of water rights fights.

Lew


We do have have a system for capturing rain for future use, we call it Lake
Houston. That lake probably handles half of the Houston Metro area. That
said, our bayous direct the water to the bay and gulf within a few hours
after the rain stops.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:
"Leon" wrote:


Typical flash flooding in the streets. Some areas got 5~7 inches in
fewer
hours.. Swingman's street flooded but that is not unusual and his
house
sets considerably higher than the street, by design. He is in side
the
Loop. I am out side the loop about 20 miles west, got 2.5" over 5
hours
and hardly saw any water in the streets at all.

--------------------------------------------------------------
No harm, no foul.

Glad to see damage was limited.

To bad, but it appears about the only good thing that happens
in urban areas is that heavy rainfall clears the streets before
finding the drains.

If some type system existed to capture heavy rains and send them
back to the aquifer, it would eliminate a lot of water rights fights.

Lew

In newer development (at least some of the time), those "run-off ponds"
are required. I don't know the details.
But cities Have Learned from experience.

In the words of a civil engineer (not me), if you strip the land and
remove the natural flow of the water,
you have to create somewhere for the water to go (now).

Bill




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On 4/30/2013 10:05 AM, Bill wrote:
Lew Hodgett wrote:
"Leon" wrote:


Typical flash flooding in the streets. Some areas got 5~7 inches in
fewer
hours.. Swingman's street flooded but that is not unusual and his
house
sets considerably higher than the street, by design. He is in side
the
Loop. I am out side the loop about 20 miles west, got 2.5" over 5
hours
and hardly saw any water in the streets at all.

--------------------------------------------------------------
No harm, no foul.

Glad to see damage was limited.

To bad, but it appears about the only good thing that happens
in urban areas is that heavy rainfall clears the streets before
finding the drains.

If some type system existed to capture heavy rains and send them
back to the aquifer, it would eliminate a lot of water rights fights.

Lew

In newer development (at least some of the time), those "run-off ponds"
are required. I don't know the details.
But cities Have Learned from experience.

In the words of a civil engineer (not me), if you strip the land and
remove the natural flow of the water,
you have to create somewhere for the water to go (now).

Bill




Actually since the great flood in Houston 12 years ago developers have
been putting in retention ponds for the sewer water to collect before
eventually ending up in of of the many bayous. Many retention ponds
don't retain water for the purpose of conservation but mainly for added
value for a lot that is adjacent to one.

The biggest reason for these ponds is not so much because of the
disruption of the natural water flow so to speak, concrete simply does
not let water reach the ground. The ground would soak up the water if
it could.






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Leon wrote:
On 4/30/2013 10:05 AM, Bill wrote:
Lew Hodgett wrote:
"Leon" wrote:


Typical flash flooding in the streets. Some areas got 5~7 inches in
fewer
hours.. Swingman's street flooded but that is not unusual and his
house
sets considerably higher than the street, by design. He is in side
the
Loop. I am out side the loop about 20 miles west, got 2.5" over 5
hours
and hardly saw any water in the streets at all.
--------------------------------------------------------------
No harm, no foul.

Glad to see damage was limited.

To bad, but it appears about the only good thing that happens
in urban areas is that heavy rainfall clears the streets before
finding the drains.

If some type system existed to capture heavy rains and send them
back to the aquifer, it would eliminate a lot of water rights fights.

Lew

In newer development (at least some of the time), those "run-off ponds"
are required. I don't know the details.
But cities Have Learned from experience.

In the words of a civil engineer (not me), if you strip the land and
remove the natural flow of the water,
you have to create somewhere for the water to go (now).

Bill




Actually since the great flood in Houston 12 years ago developers have
been putting in retention ponds for the sewer water to collect before
eventually ending up in of of the many bayous. Many retention ponds
don't retain water for the purpose of conservation but mainly for
added value for a lot that is adjacent to one.

The biggest reason for these ponds is not so much because of the
disruption of the natural water flow so to speak, concrete simply
does not let water reach the ground.

Yes, that's what I was saying. You end up with a whole lot of water
somewhere where you don't want it. I think you should be corrected for
correcting me on this point ("simply does not let the water reach the
ground" --sheesh!). : )

Bill


The ground would soak up the water if it could.





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"Leon" wrote:
We do have have a system for capturing rain for future use, we call
it Lake
Houston. That lake probably handles half of the Houston Metro area.
That
said, our bayous direct the water to the bay and gulf within a few
hours
after the rain stops.

--------------------------------------------------------------
That helps to solve the short term flooding problem but unfortunately
is doesn't address the longer term issue of rebuilding the aquifers
which have taken a beating in the SouthWest the last few years.

Lew




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On 4/30/2013 2:13 PM, Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
On 4/30/2013 10:05 AM, Bill wrote:
Lew Hodgett wrote:
"Leon" wrote:


Typical flash flooding in the streets. Some areas got 5~7 inches in
fewer
hours.. Swingman's street flooded but that is not unusual and his
house
sets considerably higher than the street, by design. He is in side
the
Loop. I am out side the loop about 20 miles west, got 2.5" over 5
hours
and hardly saw any water in the streets at all.
--------------------------------------------------------------
No harm, no foul.

Glad to see damage was limited.

To bad, but it appears about the only good thing that happens
in urban areas is that heavy rainfall clears the streets before
finding the drains.

If some type system existed to capture heavy rains and send them
back to the aquifer, it would eliminate a lot of water rights fights.

Lew

In newer development (at least some of the time), those "run-off ponds"
are required. I don't know the details.
But cities Have Learned from experience.

In the words of a civil engineer (not me), if you strip the land and
remove the natural flow of the water,
you have to create somewhere for the water to go (now).

Bill




Actually since the great flood in Houston 12 years ago developers have
been putting in retention ponds for the sewer water to collect before
eventually ending up in of of the many bayous. Many retention ponds
don't retain water for the purpose of conservation but mainly for
added value for a lot that is adjacent to one.

The biggest reason for these ponds is not so much because of the
disruption of the natural water flow so to speak, concrete simply
does not let water reach the ground.

Yes, that's what I was saying. You end up with a whole lot of water
somewhere where you don't want it. I think you should be corrected for
correcting me on this point ("simply does not let the water reach the
ground" --sheesh!). : )

Bill


The ground would soak up the water if it could.





Sorry Bill, I read you comment as indicating that the water could not
flow toward a river and or bayou because of development.






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On Tue, 30 Apr 2013 15:24:28 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"
wrote:

"Leon" wrote:
We do have have a system for capturing rain for future use, we call
it Lake
Houston. That lake probably handles half of the Houston Metro area.
That
said, our bayous direct the water to the bay and gulf within a few
hours
after the rain stops.

--------------------------------------------------------------
That helps to solve the short term flooding problem but unfortunately
is doesn't address the longer term issue of rebuilding the aquifers
which have taken a beating in the SouthWest the last few years.


What does Houston have to do with the South West?
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