Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Default Air Force Quarter?

I seem to remember that, during wwII, the guys at some eastern US air
force base found that they could solder a penny or a nickel into the
center of a spark plug compression washer and then use it in a vending
machine. The idea worked so well that it created a major problem for
vending machine makers and operators of the day.

Does anyone remember more details?

Pete Stanaitis
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Default Air Force Quarter?

spaco wrote:
I seem to remember that, during wwII, the guys at some eastern US air
force base found that they could solder a penny or a nickel into the
center of a spark plug compression washer and then use it in a vending
machine. The idea worked so well that it created a major problem for
vending machine makers and operators of the day.

Does anyone remember more details?

Pete Stanaitis


Dunno 'bout that, but I remember a kid in college that used aviation snips
to change pennies into dimes for the cigarette machine.

Until the ATF agents came snooping around...

--

Richard Lamb


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Default Air Force Quarter?

On Aug 10, 11:55*am, spaco wrote:
I seem to remember that, during wwII, the guys at some eastern US air
force base found that they could solder a penny or a nickel into the
center of a spark plug compression washer and then use it in a vending
machine. *The idea worked so well that it created a major problem for
vending machine makers and operators of the day.

* Does anyone remember more details?

Pete Stanaitis


Not that tidbit, but interesting:
http://books.google.com/books?id=OyE...page&q&f=false

It could be the non-steel insert was required to get past the
electrical resistance testing magnets.


Dave

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Default Air Force Quarter?

On Aug 10, 12:19*pm, Dave__67 wrote:
On Aug 10, 11:55*am, spaco wrote:

I seem to remember that, during wwII, the guys at some eastern US air
force base found that they could solder a penny or a nickel into the
center of a spark plug compression washer and then use it in a vending
machine. *The idea worked so well that it created a major problem for
vending machine makers and operators of the day.


* Does anyone remember more details?


Pete Stanaitis


Not that tidbit, but interesting:http://books.google.com/books?id=OyE...pg=PA66&dq=wwI...

It could be the non-steel insert was required to get past the
electrical resistance testing magnets.

Dave


It is in that article, where it continues on page 204.

Link again as a short link-

http://bit.ly/cDHv7b

Dave
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Default Air Force Quarter?

I found it! There is an extensive Popular Science article, "How Coin
Machines Detect Phony Money" from March of 1962 that covers the
"Philadelphia Quarter" or "Air Force Special". The penny was simply
jammed into the spark plug gasket.
I've plugged the link in here, but it's pretty long, so you will
probably have to reassemble it yourself:
http://books.google.com/books?id=OyE...page&q&f=false


Interesting to note: Within that pdf of the whole magazine, there's a
one page ad for "American Machine and Tools". It shows an 8" tilting
arbor table saw for $9.95. It's all there but the motor. I bought one
at about that time and used it for many, many years, with a 1/3 hp
washing machine motor that I had to reverse in a rather unconventional way.

Pete Stanaitis
-----------------------

spaco wrote:
I seem to remember that, during wwII, the guys at some eastern US air
force base found that they could solder a penny or a nickel into the
center of a spark plug compression washer and then use it in a vending
machine. The idea worked so well that it created a major problem for
vending machine makers and operators of the day.

Does anyone remember more details?

Pete Stanaitis



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Default Air Force Quarter?

Compression washers might have been copper in those days.

Martin

Martin H. Eastburn
@ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net
"Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer
TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal.
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder
IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com/

On 8/10/2010 11:43 AM, Dave__67 wrote:
On Aug 10, 12:19 pm, wrote:
On Aug 10, 11:55 am, wrote:

I seem to remember that, during wwII, the guys at some eastern US air
force base found that they could solder a penny or a nickel into the
center of a spark plug compression washer and then use it in a vending
machine. The idea worked so well that it created a major problem for
vending machine makers and operators of the day.


Does anyone remember more details?


Pete Stanaitis


Not that tidbit, but interesting:http://books.google.com/books?id=OyE...pg=PA66&dq=wwI...

It could be the non-steel insert was required to get past the
electrical resistance testing magnets.

Dave


It is in that article, where it continues on page 204.

Link again as a short link-

http://bit.ly/cDHv7b

Dave

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