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Default I not understanding this?

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado in
the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that goes
around the walls in a living room of a house.




--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite


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The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

| Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?
|
| "If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
| in the one piece"
|
| You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
| goes around the walls in a living room of a house.

US Dado = UK Rebate

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto


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Default I not understanding this?


"Morris Dovey" wrote in message
...
The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

| Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?
|
| "If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
| in the one piece"
|
| You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
| goes around the walls in a living room of a house.

US Dado = UK Rebate

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto


The US and the UK are two countries separate by a common language...
Jim


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On Oct 20, 6:07 pm, "Morris Dovey" wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

| Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?
|
| "If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
| in the one piece"
|
| You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
| goes around the walls in a living room of a house.

US Dado = UK Rebate


I use rabbet for rebate pretty regularly, and I may use a dado stack to
cut one, but I don't call a rebate (or rabbet) a dado.

JP

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Morris Dovey wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
in the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes around the walls in a living room of a house.


US Dado = UK Rebate


Thank you.

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite





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Jim wrote:
"Morris Dovey" wrote in message
...
The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
in the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes around the walls in a living room of a house.


US Dado = UK Rebate

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto


The US and the UK are two countries separate by a common language...
Jim


Thats true but I'm familiar with 90% of American terminology.

ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite



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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that goes
around the walls in a living room of a house.


A dado is also a cross-grain groove. Long-grain grooves are just
grooves.

It's not a rebate (or rabbet) -- they're removing one corner, so as to
make an open-sided groove.

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On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:17:14 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"
wrote:

Jim wrote:
"Morris Dovey" wrote in message
...
The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
in the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes around the walls in a living room of a house.

US Dado = UK Rebate

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto


The US and the UK are two countries separate by a common language...
Jim


Thats true but I'm familiar with 90% of American terminology.

ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)


Yeah and furthermore there isn't any *c* in schedule...
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On Oct 20, 6:22 pm, "Andy Dingley "
wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that goes
around the walls in a living room of a house.A dado is also a cross-grain groove. Long-grain grooves are just

grooves.


Or plows.

JP



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Jay Pique wrote:
On Oct 20, 6:22 pm, "Andy Dingley "
wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that goes
around the walls in a living room of a house.A dado is also a cross-grain groove. Long-grain grooves are just

grooves.


Or plows.

JP


Do you mean ploughs?

The dado (from the latin Datum) is the face of an architectural
feature (such as a column or wall which is the main structure).

The dado rail defines the top of the dado and the skirting defines the
bottom.

North American definition of a dado is a groove formed to accept the
edge of another board.

ref: Oxford dictionary.

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phil wrote:
Jay Pique wrote:
On Oct 20, 6:22 pm, "Andy Dingley "
wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes
around the walls in a living room of a house.A dado is also a
cross-grain groove. Long-grain grooves are just grooves.


Or plows.

JP


Do you mean ploughs?


Nope he means Plow as is the correct word for his homeland. :-)



--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite



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"Joe Bemier" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:17:14 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"
wrote:

Jim wrote:
"Morris Dovey" wrote in message
...
The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
in the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes around the walls in a living room of a house.

US Dado = UK Rebate

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto


The US and the UK are two countries separate by a common language...
Jim


Thats true but I'm familiar with 90% of American terminology.

ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)


Yeah and furthermore there isn't any *c* in schedule...


I learned that in shool.

todd


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On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 23:34:47 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"
wrote:

phil wrote:
Jay Pique wrote:
On Oct 20, 6:22 pm, "Andy Dingley "
wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes
around the walls in a living room of a house.A dado is also a
cross-grain groove. Long-grain grooves are just grooves.

Or plows.

JP


Do you mean ploughs?


Nope he means Plow as is the correct word for his homeland. :-)



I suppose that you intend "Derby" to be pronounced as "Darby".

I suspect that you suffer hearing the term "Rebate" being reduced to
the Neo Anglo Lingua Franca of "Rabbet".

I would further suppose that you decry the differentiation, or lack
thereof, between "Timber" and its simplification to the point of the
mediocritous - "Wood".

We grew up with "Sycamore", whilst (I do miss being able to use the
word "whilst") you enjoyed the "London Plane Tree".

We think of "Oak" as "Quercus alba" or "Quercus rubra" v. "Quercus
robur" and we will not go into 'Crimschmidt' just now, as it is an
unholy alliance not unlike those that occur in our Appalachian
mountain regions.

You have "Deal". We are simply trying to get one.

Ye, we enjoy "Quirks". The physicists have "Charmed" ones but we
simple wooddorkers have "Quirk and Bead", which has the charm of being
visible.

We eat "Macs" rather than wear "Macks".

We think that "Lorrie" is the name of an old girlfriend whom we drove
particularly hard.


There is more - but I have grown weary.



Regards,

Tom Watson

tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)

http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/
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Tom Watson wrote:



I suppose that you intend "Derby" to be pronounced as "Darby".


Derby = A city/town within the British Isle.
Darby = A long straight edge primarily used by a plasterer.


I suspect that you suffer hearing the term "Rebate" being reduced to
the Neo Anglo Lingua Franca of "Rabbet".

I would further suppose that you decry the differentiation, or lack
thereof, between "Timber" and its simplification to the point of the
mediocritous - "Wood".

We grew up with "Sycamore", whilst (I do miss being able to use the
word "whilst") you enjoyed the "London Plane Tree".

We think of "Oak" as "Quercus alba" or "Quercus rubra" v. "Quercus
robur" and we will not go into 'Crimschmidt' just now, as it is an
unholy alliance not unlike those that occur in our Appalachian
mountain regions.

You have "Deal". We are simply trying to get one.

Ye, we enjoy "Quirks". The physicists have "Charmed" ones but we
simple wooddorkers have "Quirk and Bead", which has the charm of being
visible.

We eat "Macs" rather than wear "Macks".


Too much fat is not good for the heart.

You mean when it ****es down you dont wear any protection gear?

We think that "Lorrie" is the name of an old girlfriend whom we drove
particularly hard.


Lorrie is the correct term for a girls name.
Lorry is the correct term for a Truck.


There is more - but I have grown weary.



Probably due to the BigMacs your always eating.



Regards,

Tom Watson

tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)

http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/


You Sir are, mad as a hatter.

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite





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On Sat, 21 Oct 2006 01:07:46 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"
wrote:



You Sir are, mad as a hatter.



it's the mercury.



Regards,

Tom Watson

tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)

http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/
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"The3rd Earl Of Derby" wrote in message
. uk...
Jim wrote:
"Morris Dovey" wrote in message
...
The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
in the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes around the walls in a living room of a house.

US Dado = UK Rebate

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto


The US and the UK are two countries separate by a common language...
Jim


Thats true but I'm familiar with 90% of American terminology.

ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)

We can thank Daniel Webster for the loss of the "u". He went on a (mostly
unsuccessful) campaign to rid US English of "silent" letters such as this.
Some newspaper in Chicago attempted even more changes for the sake if
change. Fortunately, most of these efforts came to naught.
Jim
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite





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On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 21:10:23 -0400, Tom Watson
wrote:

On Sat, 21 Oct 2006 01:07:46 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"
wrote:



You Sir are, mad as a hatter.



it's the mercury.


I wonder how many will get that.

--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net

Proud participant of rec.woodworking since February, 1997

email addy de-spam-ified due to 1,000 spams per month.
If you can't figure out how to use it, I probably wouldn't
care to correspond with you anyway.
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On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 18:34:08 -0400, Joe Bemier
wrote:

On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:17:14 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"
wrote:

Jim wrote:
The US and the UK are two countries separate by a common language...
Jim


Thats true but I'm familiar with 90% of American terminology.

ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)


Yeah and furthermore there isn't any *c* in schedule...


And there's no "f" in lieutenant.

--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net

Proud participant of rec.woodworking since February, 1997

email addy de-spam-ified due to 1,000 spams per month.
If you can't figure out how to use it, I probably wouldn't
care to correspond with you anyway.
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"Morris Dovey" wrote in news:453948c2$0$10306
:

The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

| Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?
|
| "If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
| in the one piece"
|
| You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
| goes around the walls in a living room of a house.

US Dado = UK Rebate

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto



Greetings...FWIW I have seen the word "housing" used like the word dado
in UK magazines....

hope this helps...

DCH


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"Jim" wrote in
:


"The3rd Earl Of Derby" wrote in message
. uk...
Jim wrote:
"Morris Dovey" wrote in message
...
The3rd Earl Of Derby (in
) said:

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado
in the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes around the walls in a living room of a house.

US Dado = UK Rebate

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto


The US and the UK are two countries separate by a common language...
Jim


Thats true but I'm familiar with 90% of American terminology.

ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)

We can thank Daniel Webster for the loss of the "u". He went on a
(mostly unsuccessful) campaign to rid US English of "silent" letters
such as this. Some newspaper in Chicago attempted even more changes
for the sake if change. Fortunately, most of these efforts came to
naught. Jim
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite







No, we can thank Daniel Webster for outwitting the Devil. We can thank
Noah Webster for our fine command of the English language.
Henri
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...snipped...
Thats true but I'm familiar with 90% of American terminology.

ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)


Yeah and furthermore there isn't any *c* in schedule...


I learned that in shool.

Oi vay.



--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland -
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...snipped...
ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)

We can thank Daniel Webster for the loss of the "u". He went on a (mostly
unsuccessful) campaign to rid US English of "silent" letters such as this.
Some newspaper in Chicago attempted even more changes for the sake if
change. Fortunately, most of these efforts came to naught.
Jim
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite





Here's an excerpt from an article often attributed to Mark Twain:

A Plan for the Improvement of English Spelling

For example, in Year 1 that useless letter "c" would be dropped to be
replased either by "k" or "s," and likewise "x" would no longer be
part of the alphabet. The only kase in which "c" would be retained
would be the "ch" formation, which will be dealt with later. Year 2
might reform "w" spelling, so that "which" and "one" would take the
same konsonant, wile Year 3 might well abolish "y" replasing it with
"i" and Iear 4 might fiks the "g/j" anomali wonse and for all.

Jenerally, then, the improvement would kontinue iear bai iear with
Iear 5 doing awai with useless double konsonants, and Iears 6-12 or so
modifaiing vowlz and the rimeining voist and unvoist konsonants. Bai
Iear 15 or sou, it wud fainali bi posibl tu meik ius ov thi ridandant
letez "c," "y" and "x"--bai now jast a memori in the maindz ov ould
doderez--tu riplais "ch," "sh," and "th" rispektivli.

Fainali, xen, aafte sam 20 iers ov orxogrefkl riform, wi wud hev a
lojikl, kohirnt speling in ius xrewawt xe Ingliy-spiking werld.



--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland -
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On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:00:26 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"
wrote:

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado in
the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that goes
around the walls in a living room of a house.


Since "dado" has been flogged to death, I'll note for you that the
wooden rail that goes around the interior of a room is simply referred
to as "chair rail" here when mounted by itself, and occasionally
wainscoating cap when it is used to terminate the top end of partial
wall panelling.


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Prometheus wrote:
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:00:26 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"
wrote:

Could someone kindly explain to me whats meant by this below?

"If you like extra work but a better finish, then rout a 12mm dado in
the one piece"

You see in the UK a *Dado* is the term used for a wooden rail that
goes around the walls in a living room of a house.


Since "dado" has been flogged to death, I'll note for you that the
wooden rail that goes around the interior of a room is simply referred
to as "chair rail" here when mounted by itself, and occasionally
wainscoating cap when it is used to terminate the top end of partial
wall panelling.


I did know that. :-)

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite





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LRod wrote:

ps You spell color wrongly...its colour. ;-)

Yeah and furthermore there isn't any *c* in schedule...


And there's no "f" in lieutenant.


It's called an "invisible letter". Like the "P" in bath.


--
BigEgg
Hack to size. Hammer to fit. Weld to join. Grind to shape. Paint to cover.
http://www.workshop-projects.com -
Plans and free books - *Now with forum*
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You Sir are, mad as a hatter.


it's the mercury.


I wonder how many will get that.


You mean they don't use mercury in the forming of hat brims anymore?

Shame...

David.



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"The3rd Earl Of Derby" wrote in message
. uk...
Tom Watson wrote:



I suppose that you intend "Derby" to be pronounced as "Darby".


Derby = A city/town within the British Isle.
Darby = A long straight edge primarily used by a plasterer.


I suspect that you suffer hearing the term "Rebate" being reduced to
the Neo Anglo Lingua Franca of "Rabbet".

I would further suppose that you decry the differentiation, or lack
thereof, between "Timber" and its simplification to the point of the
mediocritous - "Wood".

We grew up with "Sycamore", whilst (I do miss being able to use the
word "whilst") you enjoyed the "London Plane Tree".

We think of "Oak" as "Quercus alba" or "Quercus rubra" v. "Quercus
robur" and we will not go into 'Crimschmidt' just now, as it is an
unholy alliance not unlike those that occur in our Appalachian
mountain regions.

You have "Deal". We are simply trying to get one.

Ye, we enjoy "Quirks". The physicists have "Charmed" ones but we
simple wooddorkers have "Quirk and Bead", which has the charm of being
visible.

We eat "Macs" rather than wear "Macks".


Too much fat is not good for the heart.


Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer.

You mean when it ****es down you dont wear any protection gear?

We think that "Lorrie" is the name of an old girlfriend whom we drove
particularly hard.


Lorrie is the correct term for a girls name.


That would be the one you promised to knock up tomorrow morning in the
presence of her father, brother, and their minister, none of whom took
exception to this activity?

Lorry is the correct term for a Truck.


There is more - but I have grown weary.



Probably due to the BigMacs your always eating.



Regards,

Tom Watson

tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)

http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/


You Sir are, mad as a hatter.

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite





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J. Clarke wrote:


Too much fat is not good for the heart.


Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer.


True,but there is no cure for cancer.

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite



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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

J. Clarke wrote:


Too much fat is not good for the heart.


Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer.


True,but there is no cure for cancer.


So, no one that developes cancer is ever cured?

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com





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Dave Bugg wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

J. Clarke wrote:


Too much fat is not good for the heart.

Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer.


True,but there is no cure for cancer.


So, no one that developes cancer is ever cured?


Is this a trick question?

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite



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"The3rd Earl Of Derby" wrote in message
.uk...
Dave Bugg wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

J. Clarke wrote:


Too much fat is not good for the heart.

Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer.


True,but there is no cure for cancer.


So, no one that developes cancer is ever cured?


Is this a trick question?


Apparently. Many forms of cancer are treatable today.

But regardless of the cure, I've seen cancer and I'd rather go of a heart
attack.


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J. Clarke wrote:
"The3rd Earl Of Derby" wrote in message
.uk...
Dave Bugg wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

J. Clarke wrote:

Too much fat is not good for the heart.

Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer.


True,but there is no cure for cancer.

So, no one that developes cancer is ever cured?


Is this a trick question?


Apparently. Many forms of cancer are treatable today.


Correction: many forms of cancer are not ONLY treatable, but cureable.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com



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Dave Bugg wrote:
J. Clarke wrote:
"The3rd Earl Of Derby" wrote in message
.uk...
Dave Bugg wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

J. Clarke wrote:

Too much fat is not good for the heart.

Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer.


True,but there is no cure for cancer.

So, no one that developes cancer is ever cured?

Is this a trick question?


Apparently. Many forms of cancer are treatable today.


Correction: many forms of cancer are not ONLY treatable, but cureable.


For the benefit of the tape...
quote
"Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer".
unquote

Meaning the cancer is terminal.
Terminal cancer is not curable. :-(

I knew I should of taken a law degree. :-)


--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite



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Default I not understanding this?

The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:
Dave Bugg wrote:
J. Clarke wrote:
"The3rd Earl Of Derby" wrote in message
.uk...
Dave Bugg wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

J. Clarke wrote:

Too much fat is not good for the heart.

Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer.


True,but there is no cure for cancer.

So, no one that developes cancer is ever cured?

Is this a trick question?

Apparently. Many forms of cancer are treatable today.


Correction: many forms of cancer are not ONLY treatable, but
cureable.


For the benefit of the tape...
quote
"Ahh, but better to go that way than cancer".
unquote

Meaning the cancer is terminal.
Terminal cancer is not curable. :-(


However, not all cancer IS terminal. Therefore, stating "True, but there is
no cure for cancer" is an inaccurate statement. That statement did not refer
to a *specific* incidence of a person with a terminal illness, but rather
the general notion that cancer is always incurable. Fact: a high percentage
of folks who are diagnosed with cancer are cured.

I knew I should of taken a law degree. :-)


Hmmmm.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com



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