Woodturning (rec.crafts.woodturning) To discuss tools, techniques, styles, materials, shows and competitions, education and educational materials related to woodturning. All skill levels are welcome, from art turners to production turners, beginners to masters.

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Old December 31st 04, 06:05 PM
Arch
 
Posts: n/a
Default How big a platter? How big a bowle? How big a lathe?

Being a packrat with a valid 'pile-it' license, I saved several large
NIP 'hurricane logs'. I can resurrect a big shadetree bowl lathe and
get someone to roll the logs to it and lift the blanks up to the
spindle. Why? ....and for what?

What do you fellows with big lathes mostly turn on them? I recognize
that a high quality heavy machine will make the turning of blanks that
are well below its capacity more smoothly efficient, compared to working
at the design limits of smaller lighter machines. There are probably
practical size restrictions for platters, bowls, etc. that people use.
For me, about 14-15 inches is generally as large as will fit the average
table. How's by you?

Pieces for display and admiration might be acceptably much larger. But
by how much? Are there practicable size limits for most wood art, given
that your big lathes could turn larger forms? I reckon that shipping,
gallery restrictions, room sizes and sized appropriate to the concept
must all be considered. What else?

To repeat: What size work do those of you with maxi-lathes usually turn?
I suppose a Oneway will turn a 12 in. blank better than my N3K, but I
want to justify a Stubby, even though I'll not be changing my
satisfactory turning style or getting any younger. I'm sure this has
been hashed, ad nauseum, on the 'Brand Forums', but TIA for your
thoughts.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings


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Old December 31st 04, 06:59 PM
billh
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Arch" wrote in message
...
Being a packrat with a valid 'pile-it' license, I saved several large
NIP 'hurricane logs'. I can resurrect a big shadetree bowl lathe and
get someone to roll the logs to it and lift the blanks up to the
spindle. Why? ....and for what?

What do you fellows with big lathes mostly turn on them? I recognize
that a high quality heavy machine will make the turning of blanks that
are well below its capacity more smoothly efficient, compared to working
at the design limits of smaller lighter machines. There are probably
practical size restrictions for platters, bowls, etc. that people use.
For me, about 14-15 inches is generally as large as will fit the average
table. How's by you?

Pieces for display and admiration might be acceptably much larger. But
by how much? Are there practicable size limits for most wood art, given
that your big lathes could turn larger forms? I reckon that shipping,
gallery restrictions, room sizes and sized appropriate to the concept
must all be considered. What else?

To repeat: What size work do those of you with maxi-lathes usually turn?
I suppose a Oneway will turn a 12 in. blank better than my N3K, but I
want to justify a Stubby, even though I'll not be changing my
satisfactory turning style or getting any younger. I'm sure this has
been hashed, ad nauseum, on the 'Brand Forums', but TIA for your
thoughts.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings


I have had a 20" General for a couple of years and I would say 16" is a
typical large for me and to be honest most of my hobby stuff is a lot
smaller. Part of the problem is that I can find smaller free hardwood logs a
lot easier than the big ones around here. Big softwood but I don't really
like it.

What I do like about the large swing of my lathe is that I can put things
like steadies under the workpiece without worrying about clearance. Also
since the General has a fixed headstock, the height of the bed relative to
the height of the spindle makes it easy for me to "bend over the lathe". You
can also interpret that as "room for my belly". And of course, you can turn
small things on a big lathe but....

Bill


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Old January 1st 05, 12:24 AM
mac davis
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 12:59:39 -0500, "billh"
wrote:

I have had a 20" General for a couple of years and I would say 16" is a

typical large for me and to be honest most of my hobby stuff is a lot
smaller. Part of the problem is that I can find smaller free hardwood logs a
lot easier than the big ones around here. Big softwood but I don't really
like it.

What I do like about the large swing of my lathe is that I can put things
like steadies under the workpiece without worrying about clearance. Also
since the General has a fixed headstock, the height of the bed relative to
the height of the spindle makes it easy for me to "bend over the lathe". You
can also interpret that as "room for my belly". And of course, you can turn
small things on a big lathe but....

Bill

Hey Bill... have you tried designing a "belly buffing system" yet??
could be a big seller for us abundantly proportioned guys.. *g*



mac

Please remove splinters before emailing
  #4   Report Post  
Old January 1st 05, 12:45 AM
Jim Pugh
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Arch,
I have a Stubby 750 (after a multitude of other lathes) and altho it will
turn quite a large diameter I find that after doing a coupleof
bowls/platters in the 18-20" range that no one wants them and they don't fit
into the cupboard. That being said, the increased swing capacity has been
beneficial several times when I wanted to use a donut chuck to clamp a piece
of odd shaped material that I only wanted to machine one side. Couldn't
have done it with a smaller swing lathe. It is also nice never having to
worry about the lathe capacity regardless of what a person is turning.
"Arch" wrote in message
...
Being a packrat with a valid 'pile-it' license, I saved several large
NIP 'hurricane logs'. I can resurrect a big shadetree bowl lathe and
get someone to roll the logs to it and lift the blanks up to the
spindle. Why? ....and for what?

What do you fellows with big lathes mostly turn on them? I recognize
that a high quality heavy machine will make the turning of blanks that
are well below its capacity more smoothly efficient, compared to working
at the design limits of smaller lighter machines. There are probably
practical size restrictions for platters, bowls, etc. that people use.
For me, about 14-15 inches is generally as large as will fit the average
table. How's by you?

Pieces for display and admiration might be acceptably much larger. But
by how much? Are there practicable size limits for most wood art, given
that your big lathes could turn larger forms? I reckon that shipping,
gallery restrictions, room sizes and sized appropriate to the concept
must all be considered. What else?

To repeat: What size work do those of you with maxi-lathes usually turn?
I suppose a Oneway will turn a 12 in. blank better than my N3K, but I
want to justify a Stubby, even though I'll not be changing my
satisfactory turning style or getting any younger. I'm sure this has
been hashed, ad nauseum, on the 'Brand Forums', but TIA for your
thoughts.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings



  #5   Report Post  
Old January 1st 05, 02:07 AM
Bill Rubenstein
 
Posts: n/a
Default

For some pictures of people turning big things -- take a look at www.stubbylatheusa.com.
That said, there is really not much of a market for really big stuff. I have a 26" bowl
which is rough turned and will be ready for returning in maybe 9 months or a year. What I'll
do with it after it is done is anybody's guess.

But, the large lathe means that you don't have to be so careful about rounding blanks for
even normal sized work. And the 700 lbs of the machine means you don't normally have to
think about balance problems with a blank.

Also I turn small tops and lace bobbins on the S750 -- works great. I keep thinking I'd like
to have a mini-lathe for small stuff but every time I use one I'm happy to go back to Stubby.

Bill

In article , says...
Hi Arch,
I have a Stubby 750 (after a multitude of other lathes) and altho it will
turn quite a large diameter I find that after doing a coupleof
bowls/platters in the 18-20" range that no one wants them and they don't fit
into the cupboard. That being said, the increased swing capacity has been
beneficial several times when I wanted to use a donut chuck to clamp a piece
of odd shaped material that I only wanted to machine one side. Couldn't
have done it with a smaller swing lathe. It is also nice never having to
worry about the lathe capacity regardless of what a person is turning.
"Arch" wrote in message
...
Being a packrat with a valid 'pile-it' license, I saved several large
NIP 'hurricane logs'. I can resurrect a big shadetree bowl lathe and
get someone to roll the logs to it and lift the blanks up to the
spindle. Why? ....and for what?

What do you fellows with big lathes mostly turn on them? I recognize
that a high quality heavy machine will make the turning of blanks that
are well below its capacity more smoothly efficient, compared to working
at the design limits of smaller lighter machines. There are probably
practical size restrictions for platters, bowls, etc. that people use.
For me, about 14-15 inches is generally as large as will fit the average
table. How's by you?

Pieces for display and admiration might be acceptably much larger. But
by how much? Are there practicable size limits for most wood art, given
that your big lathes could turn larger forms? I reckon that shipping,
gallery restrictions, room sizes and sized appropriate to the concept
must all be considered. What else?

To repeat: What size work do those of you with maxi-lathes usually turn?
I suppose a Oneway will turn a 12 in. blank better than my N3K, but I
want to justify a Stubby, even though I'll not be changing my
satisfactory turning style or getting any younger. I'm sure this has
been hashed, ad nauseum, on the 'Brand Forums', but TIA for your
thoughts.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings






  #6   Report Post  
Old January 1st 05, 03:28 AM
Ralph J. Ramirez
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Arch,

I have a Stubby S750 and one reason I like the large 30" swing is that I
turn a lot of wing bowls that are normally placed off-center which requires
a much
larger swing even though the bowl isn't going to be a giant. As Bill Noble
mentioned, you can put a much larger piece of unbalanced wood on the lathe
without it bouncing around the shop. Big lathe doesn't necessarily mean a
30" bowl just more freedom on what you turn. I love my Stubby. Good
luck......Ralph

"Arch" wrote in message
...
Being a packrat with a valid 'pile-it' license, I saved several large
NIP 'hurricane logs'. I can resurrect a big shadetree bowl lathe and
get someone to roll the logs to it and lift the blanks up to the
spindle. Why? ....and for what?

What do you fellows with big lathes mostly turn on them? I recognize
that a high quality heavy machine will make the turning of blanks that
are well below its capacity more smoothly efficient, compared to working
at the design limits of smaller lighter machines. There are probably
practical size restrictions for platters, bowls, etc. that people use.
For me, about 14-15 inches is generally as large as will fit the average
table. How's by you?

Pieces for display and admiration might be acceptably much larger. But
by how much? Are there practicable size limits for most wood art, given
that your big lathes could turn larger forms? I reckon that shipping,
gallery restrictions, room sizes and sized appropriate to the concept
must all be considered. What else?

To repeat: What size work do those of you with maxi-lathes usually turn?
I suppose a Oneway will turn a 12 in. blank better than my N3K, but I
want to justify a Stubby, even though I'll not be changing my
satisfactory turning style or getting any younger. I'm sure this has
been hashed, ad nauseum, on the 'Brand Forums', but TIA for your
thoughts.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings




  #7   Report Post  
Old January 2nd 05, 04:29 PM
billh
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"mac davis" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 12:59:39 -0500, "billh"
wrote:

I have had a 20" General for a couple of years and I would say 16" is a

typical large for me and to be honest most of my hobby stuff is a lot
smaller. Part of the problem is that I can find smaller free hardwood logs
a
lot easier than the big ones around here. Big softwood but I don't really
like it.

What I do like about the large swing of my lathe is that I can put things
like steadies under the workpiece without worrying about clearance. Also
since the General has a fixed headstock, the height of the bed relative to
the height of the spindle makes it easy for me to "bend over the lathe".
You
can also interpret that as "room for my belly". And of course, you can
turn
small things on a big lathe but....

Bill

Hey Bill... have you tried designing a "belly buffing system" yet??
could be a big seller for us abundantly proportioned guys.. *g*



mac

Please remove splinters before emailing


It shouldn't be too hard to sew some Beal buffing wheels to a shirt!
In Bill Grumbine's new DVD (Bill is no runt) he refers to his ample
mid-section as his "turning muscle" for steadying the gouge.
Bill


  #8   Report Post  
Old January 3rd 05, 07:46 AM
mac davis
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 2 Jan 2005 10:29:35 -0500, "billh"
wrote:


"mac davis" wrote in message
.. .
On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 12:59:39 -0500, "billh"
wrote:

I have had a 20" General for a couple of years and I would say 16" is a
typical large for me and to be honest most of my hobby stuff is a lot
smaller. Part of the problem is that I can find smaller free hardwood logs
a
lot easier than the big ones around here. Big softwood but I don't really
like it.

What I do like about the large swing of my lathe is that I can put things
like steadies under the workpiece without worrying about clearance. Also
since the General has a fixed headstock, the height of the bed relative to
the height of the spindle makes it easy for me to "bend over the lathe".
You
can also interpret that as "room for my belly". And of course, you can
turn
small things on a big lathe but....

Bill

Hey Bill... have you tried designing a "belly buffing system" yet??
could be a big seller for us abundantly proportioned guys.. *g*



mac

Please remove splinters before emailing


It shouldn't be too hard to sew some Beal buffing wheels to a shirt!
In Bill Grumbine's new DVD (Bill is no runt) he refers to his ample
mid-section as his "turning muscle" for steadying the gouge.
Bill


I used to do that, too... didn't even realize that it had become a
habit until I had what Darrel calls a "spectacular" catch...
I use his "hip" technique now..


mac

Please remove splinters before emailing


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