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GB
 
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Default Door trimming saw

Have many people used the special door trimmer saws? Do you get a good
result? It does seem a neat idea compared to taking the door off its hinges.

Also, the only ones I have seen are circular blade types, and I would have
though they would not go right up to the hinge because the architrave would
get in the way. Do you have to finish off with a padsaw then?

If the only way to get a decent result is to to the door off its hinges then
that's what I'll do. Trouble is that I find it's usually quite a battle to
rehang the door afterwards.

Thanks

Geoff


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Dave Plowman (News)
 
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In article ,
GB wrote:
If the only way to get a decent result is to to the door off its hinges
then that's what I'll do. Trouble is that I find it's usually quite a
battle to rehang the door afterwards.


Make up some timber wedges - then it's easy to replace a door single
handed.

--
*If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Chris Bacon
 
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GB wrote:
If the only way to get a decent result is to to the door off its hinges then
that's what I'll do. Trouble is that I find it's usually quite a battle to
rehang the door afterwards.


No idea about trimming in situ, however to get the door off, first use
a sharp knife to cut right through the paint around the hinges, then
open the door to 90 degrees. Get a thin board , push it under the door,
chock it up with a block to support the door. Unscrew the screws 'till
the countersunk portion of the head clears the hinge. Use the board
under as a lever to break the paint seal. Remove all screws but one in
the top hinge and one in the bottom. Support the door to stop it falling
over, an assistant is ideal, and remove the remaining screws. Rock the
door using the board to withdraw the hinges sideways:

Lining
-------o ----- hinge out this way
|####
|# Door
|####

Don't pull the hinge flatways out of the lining, else the timber will
"break out".

To re-fit, tidy up the paint at the edges of the hinges/housings, put
the door back on a piece of board, put a block of timber under the
board, use this as a lever, pressing on the end of the board, to get
the hinges to pop into their housings. N.B. *Find the threads* when
replacing the screws, don't just put the screws in and do them up.
If any screws were different sizes, you should have noted that on
removal, & replace appropriately.
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Stuart Noble
 
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"GB" wrote in message
...
Have many people used the special door trimmer saws? Do you get a good
result? It does seem a neat idea compared to taking the door off its
hinges.

Also, the only ones I have seen are circular blade types, and I would

have
though they would not go right up to the hinge because the architrave
would get in the way. Do you have to finish off with a padsaw then?


Do you really need to trim the edge with the hinges on? Usually easier to
do
the other side, even if you have to sink the lock a bit deeper.

If the only way to get a decent result is to to the door off its hinges
then that's what I'll do. Trouble is that I find it's usually quite a
battle to rehang the door afterwards.


It really is the only way. A circular saw against a batten is quick and
easy
(and accurate) . I usually lay the door on a couple of plastic storage
type
bins, which gives you a nice working height



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John Rumm
 
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Stuart Noble wrote:

Do you really need to trim the edge with the hinges on? Usually easier to
do
the other side, even if you have to sink the lock a bit deeper.


I got the impression he wanted to take some off the bottom of a door
(i.e. for carpet clearance), not make in narrower...

If the only way to get a decent result is to to the door off its hinges
then that's what I'll do. Trouble is that I find it's usually quite a
battle to rehang the door afterwards.



It really is the only way. A circular saw against a batten is quick and
easy
(and accurate) . I usually lay the door on a couple of plastic storage
type
bins, which gives you a nice working height


Yup, if you do want to make it narrower rather than shorter then you
would have to take it off the hinges and probably trim both sides unless
you want it looking lop sided!

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/


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Stuart Noble
 
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I got the impression he wanted to take some off the bottom of a door
(i.e. for carpet clearance), not make in narrower...


Well, he did say

I would have
though they would not go right up to the hinge because the architrave
would get in the way.


Which would be a strange way of going about things...



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RichardS
 
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Default

"Stuart Noble" wrote in message
...

I got the impression he wanted to take some off the bottom of a door
(i.e. for carpet clearance), not make in narrower...


Well, he did say

I would have
though they would not go right up to the hinge because the architrave
would get in the way.


Which would be a strange way of going about things...


No, I think his point was that if you try and trim the door in situ with one
of these saws (with the door closed so you know you're trimming to the
desired clearance) then you'll cut through the architrave and into the door
frames before you finish the cut on the bottom of the door (the blade being
circular and all that).


--
Richard Sampson

mail me at
richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk


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Junior Member
 
Posts: 4
Default

[quote=GB]Have many people used the special door trimmer saws? Do you get a good
result? It does seem a neat idea compared to taking the door off its hinges.

Also, the only ones I have seen are circular blade types, and I would have
though they would not go right up to the hinge because the architrave would
get in the way. Do you have to finish off with a padsaw then?

If the only way to get a decent result is to to the door off its hinges then
that's what I'll do. Trouble is that I find it's usually quite a battle to
rehang the door afterwards.

Thanks

Geoff[/
Hi
I have seen a door trimmer with a small retracting blade like biscuit jointer which would be easier to control.
Some hire shops due carry these trimmers in stock.
Works out expensive though if you only one door to cut.
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GB
 
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"RichardS" wrote in message
...


No, I think his point was that if you try and trim the door in situ with
one
of these saws (with the door closed so you know you're trimming to the
desired clearance) then you'll cut through the architrave and into the
door
frames before you finish the cut on the bottom of the door (the blade
being
circular and all that).


--
Richard Sampson



Thanks - that was indeed my point. I am sorry I did not make it clearer.

Sounds like you guys all have the door off its hinges and shortened before I
would even get to the hire shop to hire the door trimmer. I have several to
do, so i was just looking for the simplest way. Unless I come across someone
who has actually used one of these and can say it works well, I think that I
will just take the door off. Thanks, BTW, for the detailed instructions on
how to do that.

Regards

Geoff


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GB
 
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Default


"Pete" wrote in message
...
Hi
I have seen a door trimmer with a small retracting blade like biscuit
jointer which would be easier to control.
Some hire shops due carry these trimmers in stock.
Works out expensive though if you only one door to cut.


That sounds great - do you know what it's called, please?



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