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Pet @ www.gymratz.co.uk
 
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Default Chimney flue ventilation?

Our old redundant chimney/boiler flue leads to empty airing cupboard
downstairs. Theoretically it makes a great path for internal ventilation
however, natural operation of chimney means the open vent (12" square
hole) sucks whenever the wind blows.

Due to UPVC glazing etc, there is virtually no other air inlet
downstairs. Is it possible to replace the flue top (chimney bit) with
one that doesn't naturally exhaust when the wind passes over/through or
should I be looking at another way of getting air into the house?

Cheers
Pete
--
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BigWallop
 
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"Pet @ www.gymratz.co.uk" wrote in message
...
Our old redundant chimney/boiler flue leads to empty airing cupboard
downstairs. Theoretically it makes a great path for internal ventilation
however, natural operation of chimney means the open vent (12" square
hole) sucks whenever the wind blows.

Due to UPVC glazing etc, there is virtually no other air inlet
downstairs. Is it possible to replace the flue top (chimney bit) with
one that doesn't naturally exhaust when the wind passes over/through or
should I be looking at another way of getting air into the house?

Cheers
Pete


You should already have air bricks in the outer skin of the house walls. These
air bricks allow air to circulate under the floor spaces and things to keep them
from becoming to dry and rotten. If the old chimney is already sucking with all
the windows and doors closed, then air must already be getting in to the house
from somewhere, or you'd all be choking for breath with the air being sucked out
and none getting in.

You don't want to many air changes in the main bulk of the building or you'd
lose all your heating and things. A more natural and gentle ventilation,
probably like you already have, is what you should aim for. There are set sort
of guidelines for home ventilation requirements, mainly in kitchens and
bathrooms because of smells and damp air issues, but they are not huge amounts
of air changes that need great big holes to the outside world everywhere. A
comfortable amount is two or three air changes an hour in the living rooms and
things, and this in an average sized house.

Why do you think you need some extra ventilation? Are you feeling symptoms of
drowsiness or headaches when your sitting about relaxing in your underwear?


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Pet @ www.gymratz.co.uk
 
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BigWallop wrote:

You should already have air bricks in the outer skin of the house walls. These
air bricks allow air to circulate under the floor spaces and things to keep them
from becoming to dry and rotten. If the old chimney is already sucking with all
the windows and doors closed, then air must already be getting in to the house
from somewhere, or you'd all be choking for breath with the air being sucked out
and none getting in.


There are no air bricks as the house is built into a hill, so ground
floor bedrooms/bathrooms are solid floor.
There is the obglitary "vents" in the top od the UPVC patio doors in the
master bedroom, but there is so much air routed through the vent the
bedrrom floor becomes icy cold. The only othe vent downstairs is the
extractor fan in the bathroom which struggles to suck anything when the
chimney is trying to take away our breath.
:)

Oh, and at the moment there is no loft hatch so there's the only other
vent which will in time become pretty much sealed.
The draw on the chimney makes the vented bedroom bang with each gust, so
air changes are based around one very direct pathway through the bedroom
and along the hall the oop 't chimney.

(if that all makes sense)

Why do you think you need some extra ventilation? Are you feeling symptoms of
drowsiness or headaches when your sitting about relaxing in your underwear?


No, just a damp problem that required (in the past when we were living
there) a dehumidifier to be running most days.

Oh, there is a kitchen extrator hood and will be a new vent in the
upstairs shower room for extractor fan, so a couple of small vents to
the upstairs living area.

--
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http://trade-price-supplements.co.uk - TRADE PRICED SUPPLEMENTS for ALL!
http://fitness-equipment-uk.com - UK's No.1 Fitness Equipment Suppliers.
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BigWallop
 
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"Pet @ www.gymratz.co.uk" wrote in message
...
BigWallop wrote:

You should already have air bricks in the outer skin of the house walls.

These
air bricks allow air to circulate under the floor spaces and things to keep

them
from becoming to dry and rotten. If the old chimney is already sucking with

all
the windows and doors closed, then air must already be getting in to the

house
from somewhere, or you'd all be choking for breath with the air being sucked

out
and none getting in.


There are no air bricks as the house is built into a hill, so ground
floor bedrooms/bathrooms are solid floor.
There is the obglitary "vents" in the top od the UPVC patio doors in the
master bedroom, but there is so much air routed through the vent the
bedrrom floor becomes icy cold. The only othe vent downstairs is the
extractor fan in the bathroom which struggles to suck anything when the
chimney is trying to take away our breath.
:)

Oh, and at the moment there is no loft hatch so there's the only other
vent which will in time become pretty much sealed.
The draw on the chimney makes the vented bedroom bang with each gust, so
air changes are based around one very direct pathway through the bedroom
and along the hall the oop 't chimney.

(if that all makes sense)

Why do you think you need some extra ventilation? Are you feeling symptoms

of
drowsiness or headaches when your sitting about relaxing in your underwear?


No, just a damp problem that required (in the past when we were living
there) a dehumidifier to be running most days.

Oh, there is a kitchen extrator hood and will be a new vent in the
upstairs shower room for extractor fan, so a couple of small vents to
the upstairs living area.



So all you really have is a load of air extraction systems and no air intakes.
Boy, are you asking for trouble. :-)

It would be best to install a couple of high level air inlet points on your
downstairs floor. Keep them up near to the ceiling height so they don't suck
cold air in at floor level and have your feet freezing in the winter months.

They should be large enough to allow enough air in to the building for good air
change rates, about two or three per hour for cosy living areas, but small
enough not to allow to much cold air in to the place and drag out all your
heating.

With new air intakes on an open side of the house, and the natural chimney
effect from the old flue, you should then have a comfortable living area that
stops you feeling drowsy and too cold.


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Pet @ www.gymratz.co.uk
 
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BigWallop wrote:

It would be best to install a couple of high level air inlet points on your
downstairs floor. Keep them up near to the ceiling height so they don't suck
cold air in at floor level and have your feet freezing in the winter months.


Presumably then a retro fitting of window vents into the other 3
bedrooms and one in the boiler room door will spread the air intake
across all bedrooms reducing the surges in the main bedroom (only vented
one)

I am presuming you can just buy and "cut in" window vents to UPVC window
frames? which would be better than a brickwork/ducting alternative?

TIA
Pete

--
http://gymratz.co.uk - Best Gym Equipment & Bodybuilding Supplements UK.
http://trade-price-supplements.co.uk - TRADE PRICED SUPPLEMENTS for ALL!
http://fitness-equipment-uk.com - UK's No.1 Fitness Equipment Suppliers.
http://gymratz.co.uk/hot-seat.htm - Live web-cam! (sometimes)


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BigWallop
 
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"Pet @ www.gymratz.co.uk" wrote in message
k...
BigWallop wrote:

It would be best to install a couple of high level air inlet points on your
downstairs floor. Keep them up near to the ceiling height so they don't

suck
cold air in at floor level and have your feet freezing in the winter months.


Presumably then a retro fitting of window vents into the other 3
bedrooms and one in the boiler room door will spread the air intake
across all bedrooms reducing the surges in the main bedroom (only vented
one)

I am presuming you can just buy and "cut in" window vents to UPVC window
frames? which would be better than a brickwork/ducting alternative?

TIA
Pete


That sounds a good way round it. I don't know what type of windows you have,
but I'd expect there should be something in the way of vents available for them.

If no vent systems are forth coming for the windows, then a series of 10 mm or
16 mm holes drilled through the walls, at close to ceiling height, would do just
as well. You can buy cheap and cheerful plastic grilles for the inside and
outside to make the holes look pretty. Remember not to get external grilles
with anti-blow back flaps, and make sure the grilles for the outside have insect
mesh installed in them

You don't need a hell of a lot of air intake, just enough to keep the air
circulating rather than dragging directly through the house.


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