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Andy Hall
 
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Default Lubricating Oil


Is anybody an expert on oil types?


I have a power feeder used on a woodworking machine:

http://www.ukfelder.co.uk/

Accessories -- Power Feeders - F48

These are OEMed from an Italian manufacturer, Maggi Engineering,
specialising in this type of equipment


http://www.maggi-engineering.com/web/maggi/livesite/scheda.asp?ID=3|12|21&L=2

http://tinyurl.com/4f8dc


Everything works well and documentation is readable, but at some point
maintenance lubrication will be needed.
Inevitably, Italian products are mentioned.

THere are two requirements on the machine:

a) A grease for the lubrication nipples on the wheel bearings.
This is mentioned as Athesia EP/2 IP grease.

I can't find a reference to that product, but I can find a reference
to EP2 and EP/2 grease from other vendors.

b) An oil for a sump in the body of the machine used to lubricate the
internal gears. For this, Oleoblitz EHT 16 or any other oil with
viscosity SAE 30.

I haven't been able to find oil of this type in the obvious places
like Halfords. It seems to be multigrade engine oil and not much
more.

Please can anybody shed light on what these lubricants are and suggest
some suitable products that are more reasily available.

thanks



..andy

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Badger
 
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Andy Hall wrote:

Is anybody an expert on oil types?

No, but I have to find alt. lubes at work...

THere are two requirements on the machine:

a) A grease for the lubrication nipples on the wheel bearings.
This is mentioned as Athesia EP/2 IP grease.

I can't find a reference to that product, but I can find a reference
to EP2 and EP/2 grease from other vendors.


Pretty std. grease, use whatever claims to be the same spec., but flush
existing out first incase the binders/fillers arn't compatable.

b) An oil for a sump in the body of the machine used to lubricate the
internal gears. For this, Oleoblitz EHT 16 or any other oil with
viscosity SAE 30.

I haven't been able to find oil of this type in the obvious places
like Halfords. It seems to be multigrade engine oil and not much
more.


Sounds more like a hydraulic oil, a number of Italian and Spanish
machines I look after use hydraulic oils as they don't attack the
bearings chemically, I suspect it has bronze bearings and needs
hydraulic oil.

Niel.
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Dave Plowman (News)
 
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In article ,
Andy Hall wrote:
b) An oil for a sump in the body of the machine used to lubricate the
internal gears. For this, Oleoblitz EHT 16 or any other oil with
viscosity SAE 30.


I haven't been able to find oil of this type in the obvious places
like Halfords. It seems to be multigrade engine oil and not much
more.


If it's a basic SAE 30, you can still get oils like this from an old car
specialist like

www.holden.co.uk

However, I'd say that a modern 20-50 would have about the same viscosity
at the temperatures your gearbox is likely to run at. However, with many
old car boxes that once used SAE 30, it's common to use ATF these days.

--
*If I worked as much as others, I would do as little as they *

Dave Plowman London SW
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Andy Hall
 
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On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 22:43:21 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"
wrote:

In article ,
Andy Hall wrote:
b) An oil for a sump in the body of the machine used to lubricate the
internal gears. For this, Oleoblitz EHT 16 or any other oil with
viscosity SAE 30.


I haven't been able to find oil of this type in the obvious places
like Halfords. It seems to be multigrade engine oil and not much
more.


If it's a basic SAE 30, you can still get oils like this from an old car
specialist like

www.holden.co.uk

However, I'd say that a modern 20-50 would have about the same viscosity
at the temperatures your gearbox is likely to run at. However, with many
old car boxes that once used SAE 30, it's common to use ATF these days.


OK, Dave, thanks.

It certainly is not going to get hot at all. The mechanism runs
pretty slowly and the sump is in the bottom away from the motor.

What is ATF?




..andy

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Bob Eager
 
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On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 21:47:58 UTC, Andy Hall wrote:

It certainly is not going to get hot at all. The mechanism runs
pretty slowly and the sump is in the bottom away from the motor.

What is ATF?


Automatic Transmission Fluid?

--
Bob Eager
begin a new life...dump Windows!


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Andy Hall
 
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On 17 Sep 2004 21:49:58 GMT, "Bob Eager" wrote:

On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 21:47:58 UTC, Andy Hall wrote:

It certainly is not going to get hot at all. The mechanism runs
pretty slowly and the sump is in the bottom away from the motor.

What is ATF?


Automatic Transmission Fluid?




Ah thanks.

Somebody burbled something to me about oils with and without
detergents. Does this correlate in any way?



..andy

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Grunff
 
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Andy Hall wrote:

What is ATF?


Automatic Transmission Fluid. A fairly low viscocity lubricating oil
that performs well under compression - not as well as hydraulic fluid,
but significantly better than engine oil.

--
Grunff
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Andy Hall
 
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On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 22:52:36 +0100, Grunff wrote:

Andy Hall wrote:

What is ATF?


Automatic Transmission Fluid. A fairly low viscocity lubricating oil
that performs well under compression - not as well as hydraulic fluid,
but significantly better than engine oil.


Is this the stuff that stinks like gearbox oil, strips paint and is
pretty toxic?

The stuff that's in there now smells much more like regular engine
oil.

..andy

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Grunff
 
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Andy Hall wrote:


Is this the stuff that stinks like gearbox oil, strips paint and is
pretty toxic?


Some ATF is like that, but these days it's more common to find synthetic
ATF which isn't particularly nasty.


The stuff that's in there now smells much more like regular engine
oil.


My guess is it's a single grade SAE 30 oil.


--
Grunff
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Andy Hall
 
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On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 23:14:36 +0100, Grunff wrote:

Andy Hall wrote:


Is this the stuff that stinks like gearbox oil, strips paint and is
pretty toxic?


Some ATF is like that, but these days it's more common to find synthetic
ATF which isn't particularly nasty.


The stuff that's in there now smells much more like regular engine
oil.


My guess is it's a single grade SAE 30 oil.




Ah OK, thanks, Grunff

Any thoughts on the grease?



..andy

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Grunff
 
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Andy Hall wrote:

Any thoughts on the grease?


Unless this is a 'special' application, and by that I mean either the
bearing materials used are exotic or the temperatures/pressures
experienced are extreme, standard lithium grease would be my choice.

If it's likely to get hot, I'd use molybdenum sulphide filled grease
(MolySlip being one trade name), which is good for ~200C continuous.


--
Grunff
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Michael McNeil
 
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Andy Hall wrote in message . ..
a) A grease for the lubrication nipples on the wheel bearings.
This is mentioned as Athesia EP/2 IP grease.

I can't find a reference to that product, but I can find a reference
to EP2 and EP/2 grease from other vendors.

b) An oil for a sump in the body of the machine used to lubricate the
internal gears. For this, Oleoblitz EHT 16 or any other oil with
viscosity SAE 30.


SAE 30 is standard engine oil, the same stuff used in engines since
rock oil was the source. Nowadays with modern additives the oils last
a lot longer and cope with petrol fumes much better.

Since you are not using it in a car you won't suffer using the lower
spec stuff. It won't hurt to use SAE 10/40 which is more common these
days. (Ie use engine oil.) Likewise the grease spec will be for the
same spec that is used universally on machine bearings everywhere.

A motor factor (car parts distributor) will put you right if you don't
believe me.
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Andy Wade
 
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

If it's a basic SAE 30, you can still get oils like this from an old car
specialist like


Another source for 'straight 30' engine oils would be somewhere that
services lawnmower engines. For EP2 grease check out the RS catalogue,
stock no. 198-3192.

--
Andy
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Andy Hall
 
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On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 22:17:58 +0100, Andy Wade
wrote:

Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

If it's a basic SAE 30, you can still get oils like this from an old car
specialist like


Another source for 'straight 30' engine oils would be somewhere that
services lawnmower engines.


Thanks for that. Someone else suggested that today as well


For EP2 grease check out the RS catalogue,
stock no. 198-3192.


Yep. I ordered some of that, but the cartridge rather than the big
tin.


thanks again.





..andy

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