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Kalico
 
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Default Linseed oil and Turps OR Danish Oil?

I recall someone mentioned a specialist woodworking newsgroup some
time ago. If you could remind me I'd be grateful.

Anyway, I want to apply a finish to some furniture that we've
stripped. Mainly, it seems to be oak although I think some beech too.

Some was painted but mostly we have removed that shiny shellac type
finish to reveal some lovely light brown/greyish wood.

My first thought was to apply Danish oil as a finish since I have had
good success with it on pine. Does anyone have any suggestions for an
alternative?

I would not like to darken it much although making a little browner
rather than grey would be acceptable. I also want to try to avoid a
shiny finish if possible.

My friend helping suggested using a 50/50 mix of boiled linseed oil
and turpentine substitute but as I have no experience with that I
thought I would check with this group before proceeding.

Any and all suggestions are welcome.

Thanks as always.
Rob



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  #2   Report Post  
Andy Hall
 
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On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 15:39:07 +0100, Kalico wrote:

I recall someone mentioned a specialist woodworking newsgroup some
time ago. If you could remind me I'd be grateful.

Anyway, I want to apply a finish to some furniture that we've
stripped. Mainly, it seems to be oak although I think some beech too.

Some was painted but mostly we have removed that shiny shellac type
finish to reveal some lovely light brown/greyish wood.

My first thought was to apply Danish oil as a finish since I have had
good success with it on pine. Does anyone have any suggestions for an
alternative?

I would not like to darken it much although making a little browner
rather than grey would be acceptable. I also want to try to avoid a
shiny finish if possible.

My friend helping suggested using a 50/50 mix of boiled linseed oil
and turpentine substitute but as I have no experience with that I
thought I would check with this group before proceeding.

Any and all suggestions are welcome.



The linseed oil and turps substitute mix would work well.

Even better if you use real turpentine and/or you add some beeswax to
it.

You won't get a shiny finish with it .

Obviously try a little on a place where it doesn't show before
committing.

Danish oil gives a slightly higher sheen but is not really shiny
either.



..andy

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  #3   Report Post  
stuart noble
 
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Default


Kalico wrote in message ...
I recall someone mentioned a specialist woodworking newsgroup some
time ago. If you could remind me I'd be grateful.

Anyway, I want to apply a finish to some furniture that we've
stripped. Mainly, it seems to be oak although I think some beech too.


Briwax P7 from JWBollom is good for stripped stuff. A pale, cold brown.


  #4   Report Post  
Neil Jones
 
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Default


"Kalico" wrote in message
...
I recall someone mentioned a specialist woodworking newsgroup some
time ago. If you could remind me I'd be grateful.

Anyway, I want to apply a finish to some furniture that we've
stripped. Mainly, it seems to be oak although I think some beech too.

Some was painted but mostly we have removed that shiny shellac type
finish to reveal some lovely light brown/greyish wood.

My first thought was to apply Danish oil as a finish since I have had
good success with it on pine. Does anyone have any suggestions for an
alternative?

I would not like to darken it much although making a little browner
rather than grey would be acceptable. I also want to try to avoid a
shiny finish if possible.

My friend helping suggested using a 50/50 mix of boiled linseed oil
and turpentine substitute but as I have no experience with that I
thought I would check with this group before proceeding.

Any and all suggestions are welcome.


Just to hijack this thread slightly, we're having a new European oak
staircase fitted at the moment and it is being left 'in the white' so I
should think I'll be applying a finish to it at the weekend. I
originally thought of Danish oil or Sabrina's 'Oak Oil' but will this
provide a suitable finish for the handrail or would I need something a
bit more durable/dirt-repellent?

Thanks

Neil


  #5   Report Post  
stuart noble
 
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Default


Neil Jones wrote in message ...
Just to hijack this thread slightly, we're having a new European oak
staircase fitted at the moment and it is being left 'in the white' so I
should think I'll be applying a finish to it at the weekend. I
originally thought of Danish oil or Sabrina's 'Oak Oil' but will this
provide a suitable finish for the handrail or would I need something a
bit more durable/dirt-repellent?

Use the offcuts (not the staircase) to experiment :-) and view the samples
in artificial light as well as daylight. Boy, have I seen some ballsups in
this area.
One I would try would be a genuinely clear seal (Rustins 2 pack or similar)
followed by a tinted varnish. Be careful with anything coloured as the first
coat




  #6   Report Post  
Neil Jones
 
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"stuart noble" wrote in message
...

Neil Jones wrote in message ...
Just to hijack this thread slightly, we're having a new European oak
staircase fitted at the moment and it is being left 'in the white' so

I
should think I'll be applying a finish to it at the weekend. I
originally thought of Danish oil or Sabrina's 'Oak Oil' but will this
provide a suitable finish for the handrail or would I need something

a
bit more durable/dirt-repellent?

Use the offcuts (not the staircase) to experiment :-) and view the

samples
in artificial light as well as daylight. Boy, have I seen some

ballsups in
this area.


Any particular pratfalls I should be looking out for?

One I would try would be a genuinely clear seal (Rustins 2 pack or

similar)
followed by a tinted varnish. Be careful with anything coloured as the

first
coat

Thanks - I will try a few options first before diving in...


  #7   Report Post  
Kalico
 
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Default

On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 08:07:22 +0000 (UTC), "Michael Mcneil"
wrote:

"Andy Hall" wrote in message
news
On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 15:39:07 +0100, Kalico wrote:

I recall someone mentioned a specialist woodworking newsgroup some
time ago. If you could remind me I'd be grateful.


Google?

The linseed oil and turps substitute mix would work well.


Most of these proprietary oils are tunge oil/varnishes/ cut with turps.
(You could use alcohol as a thinner.)

Paint it on, buff it off.

Can you still get tins of furniture wax polish? The silicon spray polish
works just as good. More buffing with either a day or so after and so on
to time indefinite.

Thanks to everyone for the advice.

Rob


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  #8   Report Post  
Kalico
 
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Default

On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 13:41:17 +0100, "Neil Jones"
wrote:


"Kalico" wrote in message
.. .
I recall someone mentioned a specialist woodworking newsgroup some
time ago. If you could remind me I'd be grateful.

Anyway, I want to apply a finish to some furniture that we've
stripped. Mainly, it seems to be oak although I think some beech too.

Some was painted but mostly we have removed that shiny shellac type
finish to reveal some lovely light brown/greyish wood.

My first thought was to apply Danish oil as a finish since I have had
good success with it on pine. Does anyone have any suggestions for an
alternative?

I would not like to darken it much although making a little browner
rather than grey would be acceptable. I also want to try to avoid a
shiny finish if possible.

My friend helping suggested using a 50/50 mix of boiled linseed oil
and turpentine substitute but as I have no experience with that I
thought I would check with this group before proceeding.

Any and all suggestions are welcome.


Just to hijack this thread slightly, we're having a new European oak
staircase fitted at the moment and it is being left 'in the white' so I
should think I'll be applying a finish to it at the weekend. I
originally thought of Danish oil or Sabrina's 'Oak Oil' but will this
provide a suitable finish for the handrail or would I need something a
bit more durable/dirt-repellent?

Thanks

Neil

Why not try OsColor oil?

http://tinyurl.com/4qarl

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Andy Hall
 
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Default

On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 13:41:17 +0100, "Neil Jones"
wrote:



Just to hijack this thread slightly, we're having a new European oak
staircase fitted at the moment and it is being left 'in the white' so I
should think I'll be applying a finish to it at the weekend. I
originally thought of Danish oil or Sabrina's 'Oak Oil' but will this
provide a suitable finish for the handrail or would I need something a
bit more durable/dirt-repellent?

Thanks

Neil


Yes it will. I've used Sabrina's oil for the treads and for the
handrails and spindles.

It hasn't attracted dirt in either case.

Maintenance has been a recoating about once a year.

We don't wear outdoor shoes on the stairs - obviously if you tracked
mud onto them you would need to clean it off.

All that collects is the inevitable dust, and this is very easily
vacuumed away.


..andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
  #10   Report Post  
Brian Sharrock
 
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Default


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 13:41:17 +0100, "Neil Jones"
wrote:



Just to hijack this thread slightly, we're having a new European oak
staircase fitted at the moment and it is being left 'in the white' so I
should think I'll be applying a finish to it at the weekend. I
originally thought of Danish oil or Sabrina's 'Oak Oil' but will this
provide a suitable finish for the handrail or would I need something a
bit more durable/dirt-repellent?

Thanks

Neil


Yes it will. I've used Sabrina's oil for the treads and for the
handrails and spindles.

It hasn't attracted dirt in either case.

Maintenance has been a recoating about once a year.

We don't wear outdoor shoes on the stairs - obviously if you tracked
mud onto them you would need to clean it off.

All that collects is the inevitable dust, and this is very easily
vacuumed away.


.andy


Concur, I oiled the handrails and spindles of the staircase
last year (in time for Christmas) only I used two coats of
Danish Oil. Let the first one several days to dry off then
a top coat. A slightly damp cloth removes any grubby finger
print residue and it only requires light dusting.
The finish is slight gloss just off matte.

--

Brian




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Neil Jones
 
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Default


"Brian Sharrock" wrote in message
...

"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 13:41:17 +0100, "Neil Jones"
wrote:



Just to hijack this thread slightly, we're having a new European

oak
staircase fitted at the moment and it is being left 'in the white'

so I
should think I'll be applying a finish to it at the weekend. I
originally thought of Danish oil or Sabrina's 'Oak Oil' but will

this
provide a suitable finish for the handrail or would I need

something a
bit more durable/dirt-repellent?

Thanks

Neil


Yes it will. I've used Sabrina's oil for the treads and for the
handrails and spindles.

It hasn't attracted dirt in either case.

Maintenance has been a recoating about once a year.

We don't wear outdoor shoes on the stairs - obviously if you tracked
mud onto them you would need to clean it off.

All that collects is the inevitable dust, and this is very easily
vacuumed away.


.andy


Concur, I oiled the handrails and spindles of the staircase
last year (in time for Christmas) only I used two coats of
Danish Oil. Let the first one several days to dry off then
a top coat. A slightly damp cloth removes any grubby finger
print residue and it only requires light dusting.
The finish is slight gloss just off matte.

Thanks guys. This was my intended finish but I just had a minor panic
that grubby hands (especially from young children etc) were going to
affect an oiled finish too much but you have reassured me.

Neil


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