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Default Wood filler, car body filler.

Ronseal wood filler seems to be styrene and talc, mixed, with hardener
you add and mix.

Sounds awfully like car body filler, which is lots cheaper. Is it the
same, or different (how)?

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Default Wood filler, car body filler.

Chris Bacon wrote:
Ronseal wood filler seems to be styrene and talc, mixed, with hardener
you add and mix.

Sounds awfully like car body filler, which is lots cheaper. Is it the
same, or different (how)?


polyester resin and "cream hardener"

Not the same.

The big book of chemicals has one million compounds
in it. And that's just scratching the surface, so to speak.
You could easily fill a store with items, where no two
were the same.

As for the body filler idea, beware. My repair of an exterior
wood window frame, the body filler shrinks. And it shrinks, even
though it has several coats of paint over top. The issue is,
filler used on a car, you are only filling imperfections
and the amount used is not very thick. Whereas when replacing
a section of rotted wood, you might have a great thickness of
body filler, and that's when you'll notice the shrinkage after
five to ten years.

For each "experiment" you do, only years of field observation
will tell you the whole story. Whether the compound is a
"sparkle pony" or yet another "organic loser". There are lots
of compounds making claims out there, that they do not live up
to.

Paul
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Default Wood filler, car body filler.

On 14/06/2021 18:21, Paul wrote:
Chris Bacon wrote:
Ronseal wood filler seems to be styrene and talc, mixed, with hardener
you add and mix.

Sounds awfully like car body filler, which is lots cheaper. Is it the
same, or different (how)?


polyester resin and "cream hardener"

Not the same.

The big book of chemicals has one million compounds
in it. And that's just scratching the surface, so to speak.
You could easily fill a store with items, where no two
were the same.

As for the body filler idea, beware. My repair of an exterior
wood window frame, the body filler shrinks. And it shrinks, even
though it has several coats of paint over top. The issue is,
filler used on a car, you are only filling imperfections
and the amount used is not very thick. Whereas when replacing
a section of rotted wood, you might have a great thickness of
body filler, and that's when you'll notice the shrinkage after
five to ten years.


What the hell's "cream hardener"? Details, please, details.

Car body filler generally containd styrene and an inert substance,
normally talc, calcium carbonate or whatnot. So does Ronseal wood filler.

I've used car body filler to fill holes in timber before. I have not
known it to shrink Like the Ronseal stuff, it stays the same, but the
timber itself can change.

What filler did you use? Car body filler can certainly be used in thick
layers. Maybe the "imperfections" you refer to are filled with
"stopper", not "filler"?
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Default Wood filler, car body filler.

Chris Bacon wrote:
On 14/06/2021 18:21, Paul wrote:
Chris Bacon wrote:
Ronseal wood filler seems to be styrene and talc, mixed, with
hardener you add and mix.

Sounds awfully like car body filler, which is lots cheaper. Is it the
same, or different (how)?


polyester resin and "cream hardener"

Not the same.

The big book of chemicals has one million compounds
in it. And that's just scratching the surface, so to speak.
You could easily fill a store with items, where no two
were the same.

As for the body filler idea, beware. My repair of an exterior
wood window frame, the body filler shrinks. And it shrinks, even
though it has several coats of paint over top. The issue is,
filler used on a car, you are only filling imperfections
and the amount used is not very thick. Whereas when replacing
a section of rotted wood, you might have a great thickness of
body filler, and that's when you'll notice the shrinkage after
five to ten years.


What the hell's "cream hardener"? Details, please, details.

Car body filler generally containd styrene and an inert substance,
normally talc, calcium carbonate or whatnot. So does Ronseal wood filler.

I've used car body filler to fill holes in timber before. I have not
known it to shrink Like the Ronseal stuff, it stays the same, but the
timber itself can change.

What filler did you use? Car body filler can certainly be used in thick
layers. Maybe the "imperfections" you refer to are filled with
"stopper", not "filler"?


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyester_resin

"This compound is known as the catalyst within the industry,
but initiator is a more appropriate term. Transition metal salts
are usually added as a catalyst for the chain-growth crosslinking
reaction, and in the industry this type of additive is known as
a promoter; the promoter is generally understood to lower the
bond dissociation energy of the radical initiator. Cobalt salts
are the most common type of promoter used. Common radical initiators
used are organic peroxides such as benzoyl peroxide or
methyl ethyl ketone peroxide."

They show it being used for repairs here.

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/bondo-us/

There are choices.

https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/body-filler-howto

Standard - lightweight putty that cures in approximately 20-25
minutes. Standard grade fillers are typically only
used on small scratches and minor dents such as hair damage.

Medium - also known as a fiberglass filler, medium grade fillers
are useful for tiny holes or tears in either metal or fiberglass.

Premium or aluminum filler, is called such due to microscopic
aluminum particles in the consistency of the mix. The
benefit of using this expensive filler for larger repairs
and dents is that it doesn't shrink, is easier to sand,
and is stronger than other fillers.

I don't know if there were quite that many choices
at the hardware store in the auto body section.

Body filler is its own culture.

https://www.hotrodders.com/threads/m...e-honey.51195/

"fiberglass resin is usually catalyzed with mekp
while body filler is catalyzed with benzoyl peroxide."

Paul
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Default Wood filler, car body filler.

On 14/06/2021 18:21, Paul wrote:

As for the body filler idea, beware. My repair of an exterior
wood window frame, the body filler shrinks. And it shrinks, even
though it has several coats of paint over top. The issue is,
filler used on a car, you are only filling imperfections
and the amount used is not very thick. Whereas when replacing
a section of rotted wood, you might have a great thickness of
body filler, and that's when you'll notice the shrinkage after
five to ten years.


I did not find any shrinkage after five years with a temporary repair
using a whole large tub of car filler on a window frame I did
however dig out most of the rot and treated the remaining with a Ronseal
Wet Rot wood hardener before filling.

Before getting the windows replaced I had to get a round tuit for other
repairs hence the 5 year wait





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Default Wood filler, car body filler.

TheOn 14/06/2021 21:23, alan_m wrote:
On 14/06/2021 18:21, Paul wrote:

As for the body filler idea, beware. My repair of an exterior
wood window frame, the body filler shrinks. And it shrinks, even
though it has several coats of paint over top. The issue is,
filler used on a car, you are only filling imperfections
and the amount used is not very thick. Whereas when replacing
a section of rotted wood, you might have a great thickness of
body filler, and that's when you'll notice the shrinkage after
five to ten years.


I did not find any shrinkage after five years with a temporary repair
using a whole large tub of car filler on a window frame I did
however dig out most of the rot and treated the remaining with a Ronseal
Wet Rot wood hardener before filling.

Before getting the windows replaced I had to get a round tuit for other
repairs hence the 5 year wait





The first time that I used Ronseal wet rot treatment and then their filler
was over 15 years ago. It was a window sill. It was as good two weeks ago
as the day it was cured. I have continued to use that combination during
all the years since and never had a shrinkage problem but it was only used
on well-seasoned timber. I have never used it on a car and I have done
quite a bit of body repairing over the years but never used the Ronseal
stuff.
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