UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,159
Default OT: Trankliments

Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default OT: Trankliments



"williamwright" wrote in message
...
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


Not even there
https://www.onelook.com/?w=trankliments&ls=a

  #3   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 129
Default OT: Trankliments

On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 10:05:37 +1000, "Rod Speed"
wrote:



"williamwright" wrote in message
...
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


Not even there
https://www.onelook.com/?w=trankliments&ls=a


Hardly surprising, given it's an English regional dialect word. OED2
has "trinklements" which it says is a Lancashire word meaning
"trinkets, knick-knacks".
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,366
Default OT: Trankliments

williamwright wrote:
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill


Not heard it but guess that its a dialect form of accoutrements.

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #5   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,681
Default OT: Trankliments

On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


According to Wright's 1896 "The English Dialect Dictionary" a bit wider:

TRANKLIMENT, sb. Cum. Wm. Yks. Chs. Shr. Also
written tranklyment Yks.; and in forms tranklement
Yks. Shr.1; trantlement Cum.14 Wm. [tra·ŋkliment,
tra·ŋklimənt.]

1. A trinket, knick-knack, ornament; a toy;
useless article. Cf. trantle, sb.1 2, trinklements.
Cum.14 Wm. Thoo mun be a mafflin ta think et I'd knaa what
ta meeak a sick trantlements, Brigsteear Gooardy, in Clarke
Spec. Dial. (ed. 1885) pt. iii. 23. w.Yks. Ah howd it true wi'
him wot sings On golden coorded tranklyment, Pogmoor Olm.
(1896) 3; w.Yks.2 Chs. Chs. Sheaf (1884) III. 178.

2. Gear, belongings, odds and ends; gen. used in pl.
w.Yks. It's heigh time at we'd a ockshan sale, an sell off all wir
ships an' feightin tranklements, Tom Treddlehoyle Bairnsla
Ann. (1860) 56. s.Chs.1 Iv ahy aam· t* weyt-wesh dh)aay·s-plee·s,
ahy m*n aav· au· dheyz traangk·lim*nts tai·n aayt; ahy
m*n aav· * tley*r bongk. Shr.1 Now then, young uns, clier away
yore tranklements.

I'm a bit surprised you don't have a well-thumbed copy of Wright's so as
to be able to educate the grandchildren on their heritage

--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid


  #6   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,699
Default Trankliments

Well, I'm half Yorkshire and had not heard it myself. Sounds like some kind
of composite of two words to me.
Brian

--

This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
"williamwright" wrote in message
...
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill



  #7   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 922
Default OT: Trankliments

On Tuesday, 1 June 2021 at 23:37:16 UTC+1, wrote:
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill


Not familiar with that version/spelling, but...

tracklement
Jump to navigation
Jump to search
Contents

1 English
1.1 Etymology
1.2 Noun
1.3 References

English
Etymology

Coined in its current sense by the English cookery writer Dorothy Hartley in her book Food in England in 1954, but probably derived from a similar dialect word with variant spellings (e.g. tranklement, tanchiment) used before that date across North and Central England and meaning "ornaments, trinkets; bits of things".
Noun

tracklement (plural tracklements)

(Britain, rare) A savoury condiment (for example a mustard, relish or chutney), especially one served with meat.
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,560
Default Lonely Obnoxious Cantankerous Auto-contradicting Senile Ozzie Troll Alert!

On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 10:05:37 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:


Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


Not even there
https://www.onelook.com/?w=trankliments&ls=a


Actually, the word does exist in variant spellings, you obnoxious senile
pest!
  #9   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Bev Bev is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default OT: Trankliments

On Wed, 02 Jun 2021 07:37:40 +0100, Robin wrote:

On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


According to Wright's 1896 "The English Dialect Dictionary" a bit wider:

[]
I'm a bit surprised you don't have a well-thumbed copy of Wright's so as
to be able to educate the grandchildren on their heritage


As it was possibly written by Bill (or just maybe his forbears) he
probably has a number of copies that were presented by his publisher.
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Trankliments

Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote

Well, I'm half Yorkshire


Which half ? Top half, bottom half ?

Left half, right half ?

Front half, back half ?

Bet its the back half.

and had not heard it myself. Sounds like some kind of composite of two
words to me.


Those buggers are to tight to use bits of two words.

"williamwright" wrote in message
...
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill





  #11   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,159
Default OT: Trankliments

On 02/06/2021 01:05, Rod Speed wrote:


"williamwright" wrote in message
...
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


Not even there
https://www.onelook.com/?w=trankliments&ls=a


That must me a cheapskate publication.

Bill
  #12   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,159
Default OT: Trankliments

On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?



So,
Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill
  #13   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,270
Default OT: Trankliments

On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

It's a new one on me.
(Lancs)
  #14   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,829
Default OT: Trankliments

williamwright wrote:

williamwright wrote:

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


So, Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


I'd never heard of it, and all search hits said yorkshire or
specifically sheffield ...

  #15   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Bev Bev is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default OT: Trankliments

On Wed, 02 Jun 2021 12:06:45 +0100, williamwright wrote:

On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?



So,
Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill


I've only ever come across it in Yorkshire. A few miles up the M1 from
you its 'tranklements - with an 'e' not an 'i'.

A few miles south of you into Derbyshire and it was never heard and had
to be explained.


  #16   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,560
Default Lonely Obnoxious Cantankerous Auto-contradicting Senile Ozzie Troll Alert!

On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 19:59:54 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH the trolling senile asshole's latest idiotic troll****

--
Richard addressing senile Rodent Speed:
"**** you're thick/pathetic excuse for a troll."
MID:
  #17   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,713
Default OT: Trankliments

polygonum_on_google wrote:

Coined in its current sense by the English cookery writer Dorothy Hartley in her book Food in England in 1954, but probably derived from a similar dialect word with variant spellings (e.g. tranklement, tanchiment) used before that date across North and Central England and meaning "ornaments, trinkets; bits of things".
Noun

tracklement (plural tracklements)

(Britain, rare) A savoury condiment (for example a mustard, relish or chutney), especially one served with meat.


https://www.tracklements.co.uk/about/

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
@ChrisJDixon1

Plant amazing Acers.
  #18   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 39,563
Default OT: Trankliments

On 02/06/2021 12:09, R D S wrote:
On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

It's a new one on me.
(Lancs)

Never heard it darn sarf (surrey/East anglia)

--
Future generations will wonder in bemused amazement that the early
twenty-first centurys developed world went into hysterical panic over a
globally average temperature increase of a few tenths of a degree, and,
on the basis of gross exaggerations of highly uncertain computer
projections combined into implausible chains of inference, proceeded to
contemplate a rollback of the industrial age.

Richard Lindzen
  #19   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,681
Default OT: Trankliments

On 02/06/2021 10:25, Bev wrote:
On Wed, 02 Jun 2021 07:37:40 +0100, Robin wrote:

On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Today, preoccupied, I said to a visiting child who I was about to take
home, "Have you got all your your trankliments?" Meaning toys, shoes,
phones, etc.

Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


According to Wright's 1896 "The English Dialect Dictionary" a bit wider:

[]
I'm a bit surprised you don't have a well-thumbed copy of Wright's so as
to be able to educate the grandchildren on their heritage


As it was possibly written by Bill (or just maybe his forbears) he
probably has a number of copies that were presented by his publisher.


While Joseph Wright came from Bradford he had no issue who survived
beyond childhood so he can't be one of Bill's forebears as such.
Possibly a collateral. Not to mention a bloody clever bloke who went
from illiterate mill worker to Oxford professor.

--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
  #20   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,159
Default OT: Trankliments

On 02/06/2021 14:04, Robin wrote:

While Joseph Wright came from Bradford he had no issue who survived
beyond childhood so he can't be one of Bill's forebears as such.


He might have had a bike. Many of my male ancestors had bikes, I have
come to believe.

Bill



  #21   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
ARW ARW is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,161
Default OT: Trankliments

On 02/06/2021 12:18, Bev wrote:
On Wed, 02 Jun 2021 12:06:45 +0100, williamwright wrote:

On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?



So,
Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill


I've only ever come across it in Yorkshire. A few miles up the M1 from
you its 'tranklements - with an 'e' not an 'i'.

A few miles south of you into Derbyshire and it was never heard and had
to be explained.


I have never heard of either. (J38 of M1)

--
Adam
  #22   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Bev Bev is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default OT: Trankliments

On Fri, 04 Jun 2021 19:31:48 +0100, ARW wrote:

On 02/06/2021 12:18, Bev wrote:
On Wed, 02 Jun 2021 12:06:45 +0100, williamwright wrote:

On 01/06/2021 23:37, williamwright wrote:
Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?


So,
Is this word in use in other areas, or is it just Yorkshire?

Bill


I've only ever come across it in Yorkshire. A few miles up the M1 from
you its 'tranklements - with an 'e' not an 'i'.

A few miles south of you into Derbyshire and it was never heard and had
to be explained.


I have never heard of either. (J38 of M1)


I was a bit further north - J39. Mebbe the cut off point was Woolley
Edge?
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:45 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"