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  #161   Report Post  
Old January 14th 20, 01:13 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Fuses - again

On Monday, 13 January 2020 18:12:52 UTC, Scott wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 15:37:10 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"
wrote:

In article ,
Scott wrote:
On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 14:44:36 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"
wrote:


In article ,
Scott wrote:
The best advice would be to junk any extension lead which isn't
protected by a 13 amp fuse. And if old gear isn't protected by its own
correct type of fuse, either junk it or fit one.

What about reducing the fuse to 10 amps to create an added margin of
safety (or even 5 amps if it is only used for electronic equipment)?

Because of the chance of someone else using that piece of equipment. Maybe
even in the distant future.


That's a good point, actually, especially if the extension could
continue working with the fuse running hot. I'll change them back to
13A.


If that extension lead is of sufficient gauge to blow a 13 amp fuse in
event of a fault, there is no reason not to fit a smaller fuse if you want.


I thought your reasoning was that if you overloaded the fuse it might
keep working but get very hot and damage the plug (though I thought
they were packed with sand to prevent that happening). .


Sand doesn't stop things getting hot, think of a desert and even beaches
in this country.
Sand also has the effect of lenghing the possible life-time of a fuse running
close or even exceeding it's rated value. The sand will conduct the heat
away from the fuse wire so it doesn't melt quite so easily.







  #162   Report Post  
Old January 14th 20, 03:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Fuses - again

In article ,
Scott wrote:
If that extension lead is of sufficient gauge to blow a 13 amp fuse in
event of a fault, there is no reason not to fit a smaller fuse if you
want.


I thought your reasoning was that if you overloaded the fuse it might
keep working but get very hot and damage the plug (though I thought
they were packed with sand to prevent that happening). .


Not me. I leave that sort of thinking to others. ;-)

--
*I see you've set aside this special time to humiliate yourself in public

Dave Plowman London SW
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  #163   Report Post  
Old January 14th 20, 03:32 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Fuses - again

In article ,
wrote:
On Monday, 13 January 2020 17:07:20 UTC, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
In article ,
John Rumm wrote:


With some 4 way leads made from Chinesium, its becoming quite common
for them to be supplied that way (i.e. with 10A fuse pre-fitted),
since it has been demonstrated many do not fare well when subjected
to a moderate overload on a 13A fuse (e.g. a continuous load of 18A
or so).


It does rather prove the point. No-one with any sense would load up an
extension lead to 18 amps. They would likely be the same person who
would replace a 2 amp fuse in a plug top with a 13 amp one - because
after all it gets it working again, the only important thing?


So welding is something else you also don't understand. Yawn.


Only the likes of you would use a stock 13 amp to 13 amp extension lead
with a large welder on full belt. Perhaps you should Google voltage drop.

--
*Make it idiot-proof and someone will make a better idiot.

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #164   Report Post  
Old January 14th 20, 03:34 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Fuses - again

In article ,
whisky-dave wrote:
I thought your reasoning was that if you overloaded the fuse it might
keep working but get very hot and damage the plug (though I thought
they were packed with sand to prevent that happening). .


Sand doesn't stop things getting hot, think of a desert and even beaches
in this country. Sand also has the effect of lenghing the possible
life-time of a fuse running close or even exceeding it's rated value.
The sand will conduct the heat away from the fuse wire so it doesn't
melt quite so easily.


Just wondered if the sand would help prevent the fuse exploding in event
of a sudden severe overload?

--
*I'm not your type. I'm not inflatable.

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #165   Report Post  
Old January 14th 20, 05:03 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Fuses - again

On Tuesday, 14 January 2020 14:40:34 UTC, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
In article ,
whisky-dave wrote:
I thought your reasoning was that if you overloaded the fuse it might
keep working but get very hot and damage the plug (though I thought
they were packed with sand to prevent that happening). .


Sand doesn't stop things getting hot, think of a desert and even beaches
in this country. Sand also has the effect of lenghing the possible
life-time of a fuse running close or even exceeding it's rated value.
The sand will conduct the heat away from the fuse wire so it doesn't
melt quite so easily.


Just wondered if the sand would help prevent the fuse exploding in event
of a sudden severe overload?


Logically , well it does prevent arcing as there's no air to jump across.
Obviuosly I;ve only seen the glass ones 'explode' or rather you get a flash.

I'll ask wodney to put some fuses in a glass of petrol as his ones seem to
alllow water in through the end caps, then he can try them out :-}

Maybe that's why there's so many fires in australia ****ty fuses. ;-)




  #166   Report Post  
Old January 14th 20, 07:01 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Fuses - again

On 13/01/2020 17:05, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
In article ,
John Rumm wrote:
What about reducing the fuse to 10 amps to create an added margin of
safety (or even 5 amps if it is only used for electronic equipment)?


With some 4 way leads made from Chinesium, its becoming quite common for
them to be supplied that way (i.e. with 10A fuse pre-fitted), since it
has been demonstrated many do not fare well when subjected to a moderate
overload on a 13A fuse (e.g. a continuous load of 18A or so).


It does rather prove the point.


Prove what point exactly?

No-one with any sense would load up an
extension lead to 18 amps. They would likely be the same person who would
replace a 2 amp fuse in a plug top with a 13 amp one - because after all
it gets it working again, the only important thing?


I am talking about the manufacturer here, not the end users.



--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #167   Report Post  
Old January 14th 20, 07:08 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Fuses - again

On 14/01/2020 14:34, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
In article ,
whisky-dave wrote:
I thought your reasoning was that if you overloaded the fuse it might
keep working but get very hot and damage the plug (though I thought
they were packed with sand to prevent that happening). .


Sand doesn't stop things getting hot, think of a desert and even beaches
in this country. Sand also has the effect of lenghing the possible
life-time of a fuse running close or even exceeding it's rated value.
The sand will conduct the heat away from the fuse wire so it doesn't
melt quite so easily.


Just wondered if the sand would help prevent the fuse exploding in event
of a sudden severe overload?


Its primary purpose is to quench the arc in the event of a fault. So yes
they can and will reduce the explosion risk - especially on low
impedance supplies.


--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #168   Report Post  
Old January 14th 20, 10:36 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Fuses - again

On Tuesday, 14 January 2020 14:40:33 UTC, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
In article ,
tabbypurr wrote:
On Monday, 13 January 2020 17:07:20 UTC, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
In article ,
John Rumm wrote:


With some 4 way leads made from Chinesium, its becoming quite common
for them to be supplied that way (i.e. with 10A fuse pre-fitted),
since it has been demonstrated many do not fare well when subjected
to a moderate overload on a 13A fuse (e.g. a continuous load of 18A
or so).

It does rather prove the point. No-one with any sense would load up an
extension lead to 18 amps. They would likely be the same person who
would replace a 2 amp fuse in a plug top with a 13 amp one - because
after all it gets it working again, the only important thing?


So welding is something else you also don't understand. Yawn.


Only the likes of you would use a stock 13 amp to 13 amp extension lead
with a large welder on full belt.


I don't, but don't let fact get in the way, just keep making it up as usual.

Perhaps you should Google voltage drop.


Why, I learnt about that when a child. And while we're here it does not stop a significant number of people successfully using 30A (input current) welders on 30/32A circuits & 13A plugs.


NT


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