UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #41   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 01:51 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 5,799
Default Looking for a leak

In message , Mr Pounder Esquire
writes
John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.


Snip. Not being rude.
I was losing water. The loop valve was not turned off properly, even though
it looked okay.


Further news on my leak.

Isolating the floors showed the leak was upstairs! Slight wet patch
showing below the manifold cover.

Water drip from the *plumber fitted* mixer valve! Basically the threaded
spigot on the valve was too short to seal against the fibre washer
inside the 22mm coupler. The joint was garmed up with plumbers mait.

Agricultural solution plus lots of ptfe tape...... we'll see how it
goes.

--
Tim Lamb

  #42   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 02:23 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2013
Posts: 2,040
Default Looking for a leak

Tim Lamb wrote:

In message , Mr Pounder Esquire
writes
John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.


Snip. Not being rude.
I was losing water. The loop valve was not turned off properly, even though
it looked okay.


Further news on my leak.

Isolating the floors showed the leak was upstairs! Slight wet patch
showing below the manifold cover.

Water drip from the *plumber fitted* mixer valve! Basically the threaded
spigot on the valve was too short to seal against the fibre washer
inside the 22mm coupler. The joint was garmed up with plumbers mait.

Agricultural solution plus lots of ptfe tape...... we'll see how it
goes.

Could you just saw a few mm off the nut?

--

Roger Hayter
  #43   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 03:43 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 5,799
Default Looking for a leak

In message , Roger Hayter
writes
Tim Lamb wrote:

In message , Mr Pounder Esquire
writes
John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.

Snip. Not being rude.
I was losing water. The loop valve was not turned off properly, even though
it looked okay.


Further news on my leak.

Isolating the floors showed the leak was upstairs! Slight wet patch
showing below the manifold cover.

Water drip from the *plumber fitted* mixer valve! Basically the threaded
spigot on the valve was too short to seal against the fibre washer
inside the 22mm coupler. The joint was garmed up with plumbers mait.

Agricultural solution plus lots of ptfe tape...... we'll see how it
goes.

Could you just saw a few mm off the nut?


Umm. That is where the spanner flats are. I actually turned a brass
insert sleeve so that the thread bottoms. Not intended to be a seal but
to load the taped threads and stop the joint bottoming on the body of
the valve.

If it leaks again I'll buy a second fibre washer.


--
Tim Lamb
  #44   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 05:32 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 293
Default Looking for a leak

On Saturday, March 9, 2019 at 7:56:10 PM UTC, wrote:
On Saturday, 9 March 2019 18:25:13 UTC, John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.

Longer version:

The pipework is of questionable vintage, but I am guessing 30+ years
old. Almost exclusively copper apart from about 3m of speedfit for one
particularly awkward pipe run. Largish S Plan+ system - unvented
cylinder and about 21 rads (split into separate upstairs and downstairs
zones).

The system was pretty good - only needing a small top up at most once or
twice a year. However over the last year its got worse. It got to the
point where it needed a top up every other week or so. So I carefully
checked around any areas where there have been changes in recent times.

I found one radiator tail in the downstairs loo where I had needed to do
a "live" pipework change and had used a cuprofit fitting that was
knocking about in the plumbing kit. That had a very slight indication of
a weep from around the base of the fitting. So I chopped it out and
re-did it properly. After that, no improvement or the rate of loss
seemed to get even worse! Even though there is definitely no evidence of
a leak in that location now.

So I checked the PRV drain pipe on the system boiler. That's not letting
by. Checked the drain point tap which is outside - again its dry.

Seems unlikely its the coil in the indirect cylinder since it is an
unvented cylinder, and the water pressure inside it is higher than that
of the CH primary - so if that leaked the CH would fill up!

So I had a careful look about. No indications of staining on the
ceilings, and it seems unlily one could lose that much water by
evaporation from the leak point. so I thought ground floor would be more
likely - there is loads of space in the under floor void where you could
lose water without it showing up anywhere.

However over the last few weeks I managed to get eyes on pretty much all
the GF pipework (sometimes indirectly by bribing second born to climb
through a hole in the floor and romp about in void and look for any
signs of leaks or damp, or corroded looking pipes etc). Got some more
boards up today and looked at the last two rad pipe runs. Again all ok.

Any bright ideas?


Work out where's the hardest bit to get to. It's there.


NT


Yes, that is where the pinhole leak was in my hot water system. In a wall cavity, where the pipe went from vertical to horizontal. The water was spraying towards the outside and draining freely leaving no mark.
  #45   Report Post  
Old March 16th 19, 12:21 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2018
Posts: 512
Default Looking for a leak

Tim Lamb Wrote in message:
In message , Roger Hayter
writes
Tim Lamb wrote:

In message , Mr Pounder Esquire
writes
John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.

Snip. Not being rude.
I was losing water. The loop valve was not turned off properly, even though
it looked okay.

Further news on my leak.

Isolating the floors showed the leak was upstairs! Slight wet patch
showing below the manifold cover.

Water drip from the *plumber fitted* mixer valve! Basically the threaded
spigot on the valve was too short to seal against the fibre washer
inside the 22mm coupler. The joint was garmed up with plumbers mait.

Agricultural solution plus lots of ptfe tape...... we'll see how it
goes.

Could you just saw a few mm off the nut?


Umm. That is where the spanner flats are. I actually turned a brass
insert sleeve so that the thread bottoms. Not intended to be a seal but
to load the taped threads and stop the joint bottoming on the body of
the valve.

If it leaks again I'll buy a second fibre washer.



I think I'd have started with that!
--
Jim K


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/


  #46   Report Post  
Old March 16th 19, 04:44 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 22,075
Default Looking for a leak

On 15/03/2019 12:51, Tim Lamb wrote:
In message , Mr Pounder Esquire
writes
John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.


Snip. Not being rude.
I was losing water. The loop valve was not turned off properly, even
though
it looked okay.


Further news on my leak.


I think I have found mine as well....

Having finally got access to all the ground floor pipework (lifting
floors etc), I found - erm nothing!

So today while the heating was on setback I decided to make some checks
on the boiler itself. Lifted its pressure to about 1.5 bar, and then
turned its power off. I thought that I would also check the condensate
drain. Interestingly - normally its spotlessly clean and full of clear
water. This time it looked decidedly orange and slightly scummy. So I
emptied and cleaned it and put it back, then left it alone for a couple
of hours. Had a look again and its now 3/4 full of water. Emptied again,
left another hour or so, and verified that the system pressure had
fallen a little. (I replaced a rad vent plug with a larger pressure
gauge to be able to more clearly see the difference without the aid of
the boilers electronic gauge).

So the good news is at least the plumbing is ok, and I have not got to
fix something in some awkward difficult to get at place. The less good
news is it looks like the primary HEX mush have a small internal leak.

Quite how/why that happened on a 7 year old boiler on a well cleaned
system that was always treated with inhibitor I am not sure. I suppose
until I look in the combustion chamber its hard to say what is going on.

Replacement HEX seem to range from £120 for a reconditioned one, and new
ones ranging from £220 - £450 depending on where you get it.

Now I know its not leaking water into the house I may just slap in some
more inhibitor and leave it until the warmer months!

Isolating the floors showed the leak was upstairs! Slight wet patch
showing below the manifold cover.

Water drip from the *plumber fitted* mixer valve! Basically the threaded
spigot on the valve was too short to seal against the fibre washer
inside the 22mm coupler. The joint was garmed up with plumbers mait.

Agricultural solution plus lots of ptfe tape...... we'll see how it goes.



--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #47   Report Post  
Old March 16th 19, 10:19 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2012
Posts: 8,227
Default Looking for a leak

On Saturday, 16 March 2019 03:44:27 UTC, John Rumm wrote:
On 15/03/2019 12:51, Tim Lamb wrote:
In message , Mr Pounder Esquire
writes
John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.

Snip. Not being rude.
I was losing water. The loop valve was not turned off properly, even
though
it looked okay.


Further news on my leak.


I think I have found mine as well....

Having finally got access to all the ground floor pipework (lifting
floors etc), I found - erm nothing!

So today while the heating was on setback I decided to make some checks
on the boiler itself. Lifted its pressure to about 1.5 bar, and then
turned its power off. I thought that I would also check the condensate
drain. Interestingly - normally its spotlessly clean and full of clear
water. This time it looked decidedly orange and slightly scummy. So I
emptied and cleaned it and put it back, then left it alone for a couple
of hours. Had a look again and its now 3/4 full of water. Emptied again,
left another hour or so, and verified that the system pressure had
fallen a little. (I replaced a rad vent plug with a larger pressure
gauge to be able to more clearly see the difference without the aid of
the boilers electronic gauge).

So the good news is at least the plumbing is ok, and I have not got to
fix something in some awkward difficult to get at place. The less good
news is it looks like the primary HEX mush have a small internal leak.

Quite how/why that happened on a 7 year old boiler on a well cleaned
system that was always treated with inhibitor I am not sure. I suppose
until I look in the combustion chamber its hard to say what is going on.

Replacement HEX seem to range from £120 for a reconditioned one, and new
ones ranging from £220 - £450 depending on where you get it.

Now I know its not leaking water into the house I may just slap in some
more inhibitor and leave it until the warmer months!

Isolating the floors showed the leak was upstairs! Slight wet patch
showing below the manifold cover.

Water drip from the *plumber fitted* mixer valve! Basically the threaded
spigot on the valve was too short to seal against the fibre washer
inside the 22mm coupler. The joint was garmed up with plumbers mait.

Agricultural solution plus lots of ptfe tape...... we'll see how it goes.


You can get a chemical additive leak sealer. (Similar to "Radweld")
How effective it would be in the HEX, I don't know.
  #48   Report Post  
Old March 16th 19, 10:28 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 5,799
Default Looking for a leak

In message , Jim K..
writes
Tim Lamb Wrote in message:
In message , Roger Hayter
writes
Tim Lamb wrote:

In message , Mr Pounder Esquire
writes
John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.

Snip. Not being rude.
I was losing water. The loop valve was not turned off properly,
even though
it looked okay.

Further news on my leak.

Isolating the floors showed the leak was upstairs! Slight wet patch
showing below the manifold cover.

Water drip from the *plumber fitted* mixer valve! Basically the threaded
spigot on the valve was too short to seal against the fibre washer
inside the 22mm coupler. The joint was garmed up with plumbers mait.

Agricultural solution plus lots of ptfe tape...... we'll see how it
goes.
Could you just saw a few mm off the nut?


Umm. That is where the spanner flats are. I actually turned a brass
insert sleeve so that the thread bottoms. Not intended to be a seal but
to load the taped threads and stop the joint bottoming on the body of
the valve.

If it leaks again I'll buy a second fibre washer.



I think I'd have started with that!


Plumbing fibre washers seem closely related to gold dust in terms of
availability.

When this cropped up before, I bought a pack from e-bay. Sadly the
larger sizes are too narrow to function properly.

--
Tim Lamb
  #49   Report Post  
Old March 16th 19, 10:37 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 5,799
Default Looking for a leak

In message , Roger Hayter
writes
Tim Lamb wrote:

In message , Mr Pounder Esquire
writes
John Rumm wrote:
So far all the normal tricks don't seem to be doing it!

Short version:

There is a leak somewhere in my central heating system - its losing
pressure regularly, and needs topping up with at least a couple of
litres a day.

Snip. Not being rude.
I was losing water. The loop valve was not turned off properly, even though
it looked okay.


Further news on my leak.

Isolating the floors showed the leak was upstairs! Slight wet patch
showing below the manifold cover.

Water drip from the *plumber fitted* mixer valve! Basically the threaded
spigot on the valve was too short to seal against the fibre washer
inside the 22mm coupler. The joint was garmed up with plumbers mait.

Agricultural solution plus lots of ptfe tape...... we'll see how it
goes.

Could you just saw a few mm off the nut?


You were right. The agricultural solution failed once the hot water
reached the manifold.

I have shortened the coupler by turning off the spanner flats.
Fortunately I have a set of *Mole* grips with curved jaws which were a
good fit on the remaining body. More mait and it was running OK last
night.


--
Tim Lamb
  #50   Report Post  
Old March 16th 19, 10:50 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,616
Default Looking for a leak

On 16/03/2019 09:28, Tim Lamb wrote:
snip

Plumbing fibre washers seem closely related to gold dust in terms of
availability.

When this cropped up before, I bought a pack from e-bay. Sadly the
larger sizes are too narrow to function properly.


Not cheap, but sets from Screwfix:

https://www.screwfix.com/p/fibre-rub...-210-pcs/70837


--
Cheers, Rob


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ARE You looking for Employment and looking to have business cousty girl Home Repair 0 January 15th 08 12:23 AM
I'm puzzled about my leaking roof. It's not leaking like a leak should leak. Daniel Cullpeppper Home Repair 10 April 30th 06 05:16 AM
gas fire leak test andy smith UK diy 5 September 26th 03 11:28 PM
Slow leak on compression joint - can't access stop cock The Natural Philosopher UK diy 4 July 10th 03 03:34 PM
Lockshield valve leak BigWallop UK diy 1 July 6th 03 01:01 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:23 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017