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Old July 8th 05, 12:40 PM
 
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Default Fitting a New Immersion Heater

There is a message a few posts down about a plumbing invoice got me
wondering. My house has got gas CH but I would use the immersion heater
in an emergency. The immersion hasn't worked for some time but I ahve
never got around to replacing it.
Bearing in mind the cylinder/heater have been in place for 25 years how
difficult will the heater be to change.

Kevin


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Old July 8th 05, 01:01 PM
Dave Plowman (News)
 
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Default

In article .com,
wrote:
There is a message a few posts down about a plumbing invoice got me
wondering. My house has got gas CH but I would use the immersion heater
in an emergency. The immersion hasn't worked for some time but I ahve
never got around to replacing it.
Bearing in mind the cylinder/heater have been in place for 25 years how
difficult will the heater be to change.


It's rather down to luck. Sometimes they're well and truly stuck. It's
usual to slacken them with the tank still full of water which holds it
steady. But of course if the cylinder splits, you've got a problem. ;-)

--
*Hard work has a future payoff. Laziness pays off NOW.

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Old July 8th 05, 01:26 PM
Bob Mannix
 
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Default


wrote in message
oups.com...
There is a message a few posts down about a plumbing invoice got me
wondering. My house has got gas CH but I would use the immersion heater
in an emergency. The immersion hasn't worked for some time but I ahve
never got around to replacing it.
Bearing in mind the cylinder/heater have been in place for 25 years how
difficult will the heater be to change.


Ah, good and bad. Immersion heater will be well and truly stuck. However, 25
years ago the cylinders were probably thicker and will withstand more in the
way of mistreatment than current ones.

I would soak the threads in easing fluid of some sort (probably won't help
but it might). Next day try an immersion heater spanner on it, with all the
water still in (gives the tank a lot of strength). Tap it, heave on it etc.,
but watch the tank doesn't start to give. If it undoes at all, drain the
system and carry on. If it doesn't, you are in for a new tank as well.


--
Bob Mannix
(anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)


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Old July 8th 05, 02:26 PM
Christian McArdle
 
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Bearing in mind the cylinder/heater have been in place for 25 years how
difficult will the heater be to change.


There's no need to take the old one out. Just put an additional one in near
the bottom, which just requires a hole saw. This is a much safer alternative
to attempting to release a 25 year old one. Also, check that the old one is
indeed broken. It could be just a broken thermostat, which is easily
replaced.

If you do attempt to remove the old one, loosen it with the tank full.
Rather than putting on lots of torque to the spanner, make short sharp blows
on the end with a hammer. The shocks will be more effective at loosening it,
whilst reducing the tendency for the cylinder to distort or crack. However,
you should note that the chances of failure are quite high and should have
an alternative solution in mind (i.e. cylinder replacement) and the ability
to rapidly drain the cylinder without causing damage to floors and ceilings.

Christian.


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Old July 8th 05, 03:41 PM
Doctor Evil
 
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Default


"Dave Plowman (News)" wrote in message
...
In article .com,
wrote:
There is a message a few posts down about a plumbing invoice got me
wondering. My house has got gas CH but I would use the immersion heater
in an emergency. The immersion hasn't worked for some time but I ahve
never got around to replacing it.
Bearing in mind the cylinder/heater have been in place for 25 years how
difficult will the heater be to change.


It's rather down to luck. Sometimes they're well and truly stuck. It's
usual to slacken them with the tank still full of water which holds it
steady. But of course if the cylinder splits, you've got a problem. ;-)


Useless advice. If it doesn't move, then use a blowlamps and heat the
copper around the old immersion. This expands the metal and the brass
immersion slips out.




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Old July 8th 05, 05:22 PM
John Rumm
 
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Default

Doctor Evil wrote:

Useless advice. If it doesn't move, then use a blowlamps and heat the
copper around the old immersion. This expands the metal and the brass
immersion slips out.


So why bother posting your useless advice then?


--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
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Old July 8th 05, 05:24 PM
John Rumm
 
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Default

Christian McArdle wrote:

an alternative solution in mind (i.e. cylinder replacement) and the ability
to rapidly drain the cylinder without causing damage to floors and ceilings.


Good to not try when it is full of 'kin hot water either ;-)

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
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Old July 8th 05, 05:32 PM
Dave Plowman (News)
 
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Default

In article .net,
Doctor Evil wrote:
It's rather down to luck. Sometimes they're well and truly stuck. It's
usual to slacken them with the tank still full of water which holds it
steady. But of course if the cylinder splits, you've got a problem. ;-)


Useless advice.


But near enough the same as all the other *practical* people on here have
given? But it's nice to see you've taken my advice and started to deal
with simple things.

If it doesn't move, then use a blowlamps and heat the
copper around the old immersion. This expands the metal and the brass
immersion slips out.


You'd have to expand it a long way before the immersion would 'slip' out.

6/10.

--
*When a clock is hungry it goes back four seconds.*

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Old July 8th 05, 05:35 PM
news
 
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Default

Christian McArdle wrote:
Bearing in mind the cylinder/heater have been in place for 25 years
how difficult will the heater be to change.


There's no need to take the old one out. Just put an additional one
in near the bottom, which just requires a hole saw. This is a much
safer alternative to attempting to release a 25 year old one. Also,
check that the old one is indeed broken. It could be just a broken
thermostat, which is easily replaced.

If you do attempt to remove the old one, loosen it with the tank full.
Rather than putting on lots of torque to the spanner, make short
sharp blows on the end with a hammer. The shocks will be more
effective at loosening it, whilst reducing the tendency for the
cylinder to distort or crack. However, you should note that the
chances of failure are quite high and should have an alternative
solution in mind (i.e. cylinder replacement) and the ability to
rapidly drain the cylinder without causing damage to floors and
ceilings.

Christian.


FWIW I tried losening a stuck immersion element with a flat spanner
and it buckled the tank. the best tool for the job is a box type spanner
with a bar through it as you can control the rotation and deflection. the
flat type spanner seems to 'torque up' and in my case buckled the tank.

heat *is* beter than penetrating oil and if you slacken the outlet on top of
the tank (after cutting off the cold feed, obv) you only get whatever water
is held in the tube (half a litre) escaping rather than the gallons that escape
if you just crack the element and unscrew it (been there, done that)

I then cut the hot outlet 22mm at centrepoint and added a 22mm copper
pushfit joint to allow me to rotate the hot outlet pipe clear of the top of the
cylinder. I then syphoned out enough water to clear the element hole.

it's hot, I'm tired, but the OP should get the picture ;-)




RT


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Old July 8th 05, 06:44 PM
Dave Plowman (News)
 
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Default

In article ,
news wrote:
FWIW I tried losening a stuck immersion element with a flat spanner
and it buckled the tank. the best tool for the job is a box type spanner
with a bar through it as you can control the rotation and deflection. the
flat type spanner seems to 'torque up' and in my case buckled the tank.


But if you try the impact method, you need a spanner that is in line with
the 'nut'.

heat *is* beter than penetrating oil and if you slacken the outlet on
top of the tank (after cutting off the cold feed, obv) you only get
whatever water is held in the tube (half a litre) escaping rather than
the gallons that escape if you just crack the element and unscrew it
(been there, done that)


Well, there shouldn't be much leakage - if any - if you just break the
'seal'. You can tighten it up afterwards if there is, then drain down
enough to remove it.

I then cut the hot outlet 22mm at centrepoint and added a 22mm copper
pushfit joint to allow me to rotate the hot outlet pipe clear of the top
of the cylinder. I then syphoned out enough water to clear the element
hole.


Hopefully there should be a drain cock at the bottom of the cylinder? If
not, and you've got to do some plumbing, fit one.

it's hot, I'm tired, but the OP should get the picture ;-)


There are many different ways to approach this problem and all welcome. ;-)

--
*Time is what keeps everything from happening at once.

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.


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