Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old December 19th 19, 07:30 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default How do you know you are a good Machinist?

On Friday, June 11, 1999 at 12:00:00 AM UTC-7, Ostcroix wrote:
Hello :


I've been working at the same place for the past
12 years and I've mastered every thing at my shop
execpt the C N C machines. We have a old 5T
Fanuc control but we only run one part on there.
I would say that I have good fundmental skills on
the conventional machines. However, I would like
to get better. Does anyone have Tips or questions
a machinist should ask themselves to determine
if they are a capable machinst ? Does 12 years
of making the same type parts make me a solid
machinist? How Can I furthur hone my skills where
I am at ? I am really wondering if I am a good machinist



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Old December 20th 19, 01:56 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default How do you know you are a good Machinist?

On 12/19/2019 12:47 PM, Clare Snyder wrote: On Thu, 19 Dec 2019
07:23:02 -0700, Bob La Londe
wrote:

On 12/19/2019 12:30 AM, wrote:
On Friday, June 11, 1999 at 12:00:00 AM UTC-7, Ostcroix wrote:
Hello :


I've been working at the same place for the past
12 years and I've mastered every thing at my shop
execpt the C N C machines. We have a old 5T
Fanuc control but we only run one part on there.
I would say that I have good fundmental skills on
the conventional machines. However, I would like
to get better. Does anyone have Tips or questions
a machinist should ask themselves to determine
if they are a capable machinst ? Does 12 years
of making the same type parts make me a solid
machinist? How Can I furthur hone my skills where
I am at ? I am really wondering if I am a good machinist


A 20 year old thread... and yet still a good question.

A "good machinist" should be able to take a drawing of something he's
never made before and figure out how to make it accurately without
making too much scrap - and after figuring it out, repeat it.


How about those of us who work from pencil scrawlings on a scrap of
paper and often have questions for clarification met with "like that
other thing I didn't send you an image of" and "you know what I mean"
instead of actual answers. Or worse, "I just want it ultra realistic
and it has to be 'exactly' perfect." If its in a verbal conversation
their pitch almost always changes when they say the word exactly.

LOL.

Often my response to customers is, "I have no way of seeing the pretty
picture in your head. Please draw a picture. Even if its not very
good." Some are amazingly bad. The ones that kill me are the guys who
struggle to draw a marginally circular image who then proceed to tackle
a detailed perspective drawing. I have to applaud the effort. I would
love to own some of those images. I'd frame them and put on a modern
art exhibit. Picasso would be bewildered. Sometimes I really wish I
could see it the same way they do. That's the market I picked though.

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Old December 20th 19, 05:55 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default How do you know you are a good Machinist?

On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 06:56:24 -0700, Bob La Londe
wrote:

On 12/19/2019 12:47 PM, Clare Snyder wrote: On Thu, 19 Dec 2019
07:23:02 -0700, Bob La Londe
wrote:

On 12/19/2019 12:30 AM, wrote:
On Friday, June 11, 1999 at 12:00:00 AM UTC-7, Ostcroix wrote:
Hello :


I've been working at the same place for the past
12 years and I've mastered every thing at my shop
execpt the C N C machines. We have a old 5T
Fanuc control but we only run one part on there.
I would say that I have good fundmental skills on
the conventional machines. However, I would like
to get better. Does anyone have Tips or questions
a machinist should ask themselves to determine
if they are a capable machinst ? Does 12 years
of making the same type parts make me a solid
machinist? How Can I furthur hone my skills where
I am at ? I am really wondering if I am a good machinist


A 20 year old thread... and yet still a good question.

A "good machinist" should be able to take a drawing of something he's
never made before and figure out how to make it accurately without
making too much scrap - and after figuring it out, repeat it.


How about those of us who work from pencil scrawlings on a scrap of
paper and often have questions for clarification met with "like that
other thing I didn't send you an image of" and "you know what I mean"
instead of actual answers. Or worse, "I just want it ultra realistic
and it has to be 'exactly' perfect." If its in a verbal conversation
their pitch almost always changes when they say the word exactly.

LOL.

Often my response to customers is, "I have no way of seeing the pretty
picture in your head. Please draw a picture. Even if its not very
good." Some are amazingly bad. The ones that kill me are the guys who
struggle to draw a marginally circular image who then proceed to tackle
a detailed perspective drawing. I have to applaud the effort. I would
love to own some of those images. I'd frame them and put on a modern
art exhibit. Picasso would be bewildered. Sometimes I really wish I
could see it the same way they do. That's the market I picked though.

The mark of a good "machinist" is one who can make the exact gizmo
the client wants, given only the rough functional requirements - even
when the client hasn't got a CLUE what he wants it to do - - - - -

Exactly the same as the mark of a good "computer programmer"

"It's a (black) art - not a science!!"


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Old December 21st 19, 09:29 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default How do you know you are a good Machinist?

Bob La Londe writes:

On 12/19/2019 12:47 PM, Clare Snyder wrote: On Thu, 19 Dec 2019
07:23:02 -0700, Bob La Londe
wrote:

On 12/19/2019 12:30 AM, wrote:
On Friday, June 11, 1999 at 12:00:00 AM UTC-7, Ostcroix wrote:
Hello :


I've been working at the same place for the past
12 years and I've mastered every thing at my shop
execpt the C N C machines. We have a old 5T
Fanuc control but we only run one part on there.
I would say that I have good fundmental skills on
the conventional machines. However, I would like
to get better. Does anyone have Tips or questions
a machinist should ask themselves to determine
if they are a capable machinst ? Does 12 years
of making the same type parts make me a solid
machinist? How Can I furthur hone my skills where
I am at ? I am really wondering if I am a good machinist


A 20 year old thread... and yet still a good question.

A "good machinist" should be able to take a drawing of something he's
never made before and figure out how to make it accurately without
making too much scrap - and after figuring it out, repeat it.


How about those of us who work from pencil scrawlings on a scrap of
paper and often have questions for clarification met with "like that
other thing I didn't send you an image of" and "you know what I mean"
instead of actual answers. Or worse, "I just want it ultra realistic
and it has to be 'exactly' perfect." If its in a verbal conversation
their pitch almost always changes when they say the word exactly.

LOL.

Often my response to customers is, "I have no way of seeing the pretty
picture in your head. Please draw a picture. Even if its not very
good." Some are amazingly bad. The ones that kill me are the guys
who struggle to draw a marginally circular image who then proceed to
tackle a detailed perspective drawing. I have to applaud the effort.
I would love to own some of those images. I'd frame them and put on a
modern art exhibit. Picasso would be bewildered. Sometimes I really
wish I could see it the same way they do. That's the market I picked
though.


Thanks Bob for sharing this insight into your world :-)
It's brilliant. the mind's eye sees these scenes vividly, the way you
conjure it up.
Best wishes.
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Old December 21st 19, 12:45 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 5,706
Default How do you know you are a good Machinist?

"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
...
On 12/19/2019 12:47 PM, Clare Snyder wrote: On Thu, 19 Dec 2019
07:23:02 -0700, Bob La Londe
wrote:

On 12/19/2019 12:30 AM, wrote:
On Friday, June 11, 1999 at 12:00:00 AM UTC-7, Ostcroix wrote:
Hello :


I've been working at the same place for the past
12 years and I've mastered every thing at my shop
execpt the C N C machines. We have a old 5T
Fanuc control but we only run one part on there.
I would say that I have good fundmental skills on
the conventional machines. However, I would like
to get better. Does anyone have Tips or questions
a machinist should ask themselves to determine
if they are a capable machinst ? Does 12 years
of making the same type parts make me a solid
machinist? How Can I furthur hone my skills where
I am at ? I am really wondering if I am a good machinist


A 20 year old thread... and yet still a good question.

A "good machinist" should be able to take a drawing of something
he's
never made before and figure out how to make it accurately without
making too much scrap - and after figuring it out, repeat it.


How about those of us who work from pencil scrawlings on a scrap of
paper and often have questions for clarification met with "like that
other thing I didn't send you an image of" and "you know what I
mean" instead of actual answers. Or worse, "I just want it ultra
realistic and it has to be 'exactly' perfect." If its in a verbal
conversation their pitch almost always changes when they say the
word exactly.

LOL.

Often my response to customers is, "I have no way of seeing the
pretty picture in your head. Please draw a picture. Even if its
not very good." Some are amazingly bad. The ones that kill me are
the guys who struggle to draw a marginally circular image who then
proceed to tackle a detailed perspective drawing. I have to applaud
the effort. I would love to own some of those images. I'd frame
them and put on a modern art exhibit. Picasso would be bewildered.
Sometimes I really wish I could see it the same way they do. That's
the market I picked though.


I tried to learn drafting and machining well enough to not be that
guy, with the result that the electrical engineers simply handed me
the mechanical problem to solve as I saw fit.

It still helped if an experienced machinist could suggest changes to
make the parts easier, faster and cheaper to produce, though that's
really a production engineer rather than a machinist task.

Aound here the small job shops are used to working with Lockheed / BAE
and are good at (if not always happy about) dealing with engineers.



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Old December 21st 19, 06:47 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default How do you know you are a good Machinist?

"Jim Wilkins" on Sat, 21 Dec 2019 07:45:20
-0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

Often my response to customers is, "I have no way of seeing the
pretty picture in your head. Please draw a picture. Even if its
not very good." Some are amazingly bad. The ones that kill me are
the guys who struggle to draw a marginally circular image who then
proceed to tackle a detailed perspective drawing. I have to applaud
the effort. I would love to own some of those images. I'd frame
them and put on a modern art exhibit. Picasso would be bewildered.
Sometimes I really wish I could see it the same way they do. That's
the market I picked though.


I tried to learn drafting and machining well enough to not be that
guy, with the result that the electrical engineers simply handed me
the mechanical problem to solve as I saw fit.

It still helped if an experienced machinist could suggest changes to
make the parts easier, faster and cheaper to produce, though that's
really a production engineer rather than a machinist task.


I retrained as a CAD guy. I remember a two part assignment:
design the casting, then design resulting part. I thought "If I make
the casting suchly, then holding it for the machining will be easier."
And transferring "the sketch" to the drawing I said "I can make
that" meaning all the info I need is there. Except for the note about
the material, forgot that. Oops.

Aound here the small job shops are used to working with Lockheed / BAE
and are good at (if not always happy about) dealing with engineers.

--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
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Old December 21st 19, 07:29 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default How do you know you are a good Machinist?

"pyotr filipivich" wrote in message
...
"Jim Wilkins" on Sat, 21 Dec 2019 07:45:20
-0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:


I retrained as a CAD guy. I remember a two part assignment:
design the casting, then design resulting part. I thought "If I
make
the casting suchly, then holding it for the machining will be
easier."
And transferring "the sketch" to the drawing I said "I can make
that" meaning all the info I need is there. Except for the note
about
the material, forgot that. Oops.


Yes, let them choose the alloy that gives them the best results and
then send a revised print.

When I talked to circuit board makers before sending out a quote
package they often would tell me they'd make the board differently
depending on their equipment and supplies on hand, so I had to adjust
the quote to fit all of them by removing some specs and relying on
past experience with their quality. For these RF circuits the signal
trace impedances were determined by my line widths and their inner
plane spacings and insulation dielectric constants.

Throughout the 70's and 80's I watched them improve from loose
commercial to demanding mil-spec standards and process control for all
their products. Everything else benefited from their ability to make
circuit boards for defense contractors whose tech was 20 years ahead
of civilian applications.


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Old December 21st 19, 11:50 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default How do you know you are a good Machinist?

"Richard Smith" wrote in message
...
Bob La Londe writes:

...
Thanks Bob for sharing this insight into your world :-)
It's brilliant. the mind's eye sees these scenes vividly, the way
you
conjure it up.
Best wishes.


You seem very purrceptive. Can you explain the new British "Cats"
movie?

"Oh God, my eyes!"
- a typical film critic's review





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