Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old June 5th 15, 04:55 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Hi-temp cement advice please

On Thursday, June 4, 2015 at 3:59:21 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Wed, 03 Jun 2015 14:38:29 -0400, Ned Simmons
wrote:

On Wed, 03 Jun 2015 11:06:00 -0700, wrote:

My brother and I are welding up a couple of replicas of a "Klamath
Stove" See this link:
http://www.foresthistory.org/ASPNET/...amp/sec4-6.htm
The first picture of the stove shows a man standing by a stove with a
square chimney. This is the stove we are replicating. However, the
original Klamath Stove just had a metal top and front whereas ours are
complete steel boxes that will be set into some type of concrete. By
the way, the article is quite old and mentions that the stoves haven't
yet had the test of time. The stoves were built by the CCC during the
depression. So they are about 80 years old and still work very well.
So I guess they have now been time tested. When the stoves are done
and ready to be put in concrete what should we use? Will plain old
post mix work? Do we need special cement in the concrete mix?
Thanks,
Eric


If the "3 to 1 concrete mix" cited in the article has worked inside
the fire boxes for all these years, it ought to work outside as well.
I assume that means 3 parts sand to 1 part concrete and no aggregate.
This stuff (with which I once had an initmate relationship*) is
probably pretty close if you don't want to mix your own.
http://www.quikrete.com/productlines/SandToppingMix.asp

*My relationship with Quikrete involved driving a truck delivering it
around eastern MA, CT and RI when I was in college in Boston in the
early 70's.

I missed that Ned. It does indeed look like plain old concrete
will work.
Thanks,
Eric


If carrying the entire thing around is a problem, there is always foam concrete, which is more lightweight. I don't know about the maximum temperature it can take, though.

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Old June 6th 15, 03:57 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Hi-temp cement advice please

You start out with water and it starts the chemical actions.
When you burn out the furnace - steam it out - the water steams out
and nothing is left. It is rock hard. High temp.

Martin

On 6/4/2015 3:33 AM, David Billington wrote:
On 04/06/15 04:11, Martin Eastburn wrote:
I'd put in a refractory cement - AL based comes in a bag.
Refractory cement isn't a water based cement. Portland cement has water
stored in the cement.

I use refractory cement - a different process - and it is in my furnace.
I melt Al and Brass. I don't want it to spit or explode.

If you spill some Al or Brass on the concrete floor - it will pop a
chunk out with steam explosion.

Martin

Plenty of refractory cement is water based, I use 1600C and 1650C
capable refractory castable frequently, and some 1800C from time to
time, all work by adding water. The key is in the drying out and
commissioning the cast parts to dry out any initial excess water and
then driving off the chemically bound water. The binder isn't Portland
cement as that won't take the heat, but an alumina silicate based cement.


On 6/3/2015 1:06 PM, wrote:
My brother and I are welding up a couple of replicas of a "Klamath
Stove" See this link:
http://www.foresthistory.org/ASPNET/...amp/sec4-6.htm

The first picture of the stove shows a man standing by a stove with a
square chimney. This is the stove we are replicating. However, the
original Klamath Stove just had a metal top and front whereas ours are
complete steel boxes that will be set into some type of concrete. By
the way, the article is quite old and mentions that the stoves haven't
yet had the test of time. The stoves were built by the CCC during the
depression. So they are about 80 years old and still work very well.
So I guess they have now been time tested. When the stoves are done
and ready to be put in concrete what should we use? Will plain old
post mix work? Do we need special cement in the concrete mix?
Thanks,
Eric


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Old June 7th 15, 03:15 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Hi-temp cement advice please

On Wednesday, June 3, 2015 at 2:00:24 PM UTC-4, wrote:
My brother and I are welding up a couple of replicas of a "Klamath
Stove" See this link:

Do we need special cement in the concrete mix?
Thanks,
Eric



I was out of town so am late to reply. Sorry. Anyway take a look at

http://info.bioenergylists.org/stove...od_furnace.pdf

It is kind of interesting even if you are not going to build one. Near the back of the article is a section on how to make vermiculite cement. Worth thinking about.

Dan


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