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Default Paint Stripper again

Now that the temp. has dropped below 70 again, I've been trying to strip
paint off the outside of a steel entry door again, but after half an
hour, except for the odd small patches where paint is coming off when I
scrape it, all that's coming off is a clear film (presumably the dried
stripper) leaving the paint underneath virtually unscathed.

The previous owners left none of this paint behind (they left others),
so I have no idea what it is. Supposing it is an epoxy? Would that
behave the way I'm seeing, and would that indicate that some
extra-strength stripper is needed?

Perce
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Default Paint Stripper again


Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
Now that the temp. has dropped below 70 again, I've been trying to strip
paint off the outside of a steel entry door again, but after half an
hour, except for the odd small patches where paint is coming off when I
scrape it, all that's coming off is a clear film (presumably the dried
stripper) leaving the paint underneath virtually unscathed.

The previous owners left none of this paint behind (they left others),
so I have no idea what it is. Supposing it is an epoxy? Would that
behave the way I'm seeing, and would that indicate that some
extra-strength stripper is needed?

Perce


Okay, since the existing paint is so impervious to your efforts, _why_
would you want to mess with it? Unless it's horribly irregular. (If it
ain't broken ... )

Assuming you've a reason to paint it, which is your call of course, I'd
prep it, prime as necessary, and paint it. Meaning:
1. Sand and scrape to remove irregularities and help new paint stick.
2. Prime as required, mainly related to having finish coat cover. Sand
lightly when dry.
3. Take door down, and apply finish paint with it horizontal, or as
close as possible to horizontal. Assuming you want good job.

HTH,
J

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Default Paint Stripper again

On 08/28/06 03:50 pm wrote:

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
Now that the temp. has dropped below 70 again, I've been trying to strip
paint off the outside of a steel entry door again, but after half an
hour, except for the odd small patches where paint is coming off when I
scrape it, all that's coming off is a clear film (presumably the dried
stripper) leaving the paint underneath virtually unscathed.

The previous owners left none of this paint behind (they left others),
so I have no idea what it is. Supposing it is an epoxy? Would that
behave the way I'm seeing, and would that indicate that some
extra-strength stripper is needed?


Okay, since the existing paint is so impervious to your efforts, _why_
would you want to mess with it? Unless it's horribly irregular. (If it
ain't broken ... )

Assuming you've a reason to paint it, which is your call of course, I'd
prep it, prime as necessary, and paint it. Meaning:
1. Sand and scrape to remove irregularities and help new paint stick.
2. Prime as required, mainly related to having finish coat cover. Sand
lightly when dry.
3. Take door down, and apply finish paint with it horizontal, or as
close as possible to horizontal. Assuming you want good job.


I want to strip down to bare metal because

1. The previous paint job was horrible: horrendous brush marks and
irregular patches suggesting rust underneath;

2. Where the top coat of paint is damaged, it's not too difficult to
peel sizable pieces away from the underlying layer. So there doesn't
seem to be any point in putting new paint over a previous bad prep job.

Perce
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Default Paint Stripper again

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
Now that the temp. has dropped below 70 again, I've been trying to strip
paint off the outside of a steel entry door again, but after half an
hour, except for the odd small patches where paint is coming off when I
scrape it, all that's coming off is a clear film (presumably the dried
stripper) leaving the paint underneath virtually unscathed.

The previous owners left none of this paint behind (they left others),
so I have no idea what it is. Supposing it is an epoxy? Would that
behave the way I'm seeing, and would that indicate that some
extra-strength stripper is needed?

Perce

If you are using semi-paste paint remover (with methylene something in
it), brushing it on thick, and leaving for about half hour, you should
be getting results. The loose paint will wrinkle up and scrape away
easily. It often takes two or three applications to get through
multiple coats of paint. I dump the goo into a coffee can and often
recycle it, as even with a lot of paint mixed in it will still work.

If you have a coat of primer that won't budge, leave it on and just sand
it smoothe. Possible it might have a baked on coat of something. When
down to the last traces of paint, I scrub with steel wool and wipe it
off with steel wool, scrub with steel wool and mineral spirits, wipe
that off. If there is rust, sand it. Prime right away (after drying) if
it is a steel door. A wipe with denatured alc. helps dry it and make
sure no oils or grease remain.
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Default Paint Stripper again


Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
Now that the temp. has dropped below 70 again, I've been trying to strip
paint off the outside of a steel entry door again, but after half an
hour, except for the odd small patches where paint is coming off when I
scrape it, all that's coming off is a clear film (presumably the dried
stripper) leaving the paint underneath virtually unscathed.

The previous owners left none of this paint behind (they left others),
so I have no idea what it is. Supposing it is an epoxy? Would that
behave the way I'm seeing, and would that indicate that some
extra-strength stripper is needed?


I would try removing the door for the stripping and put it on horses.
It is quite easier to strip a horizonat surface than a vertical one.

When you buy stripper, look for a high concentration of methylene
chloride. It should be one of the first ingredients on the list.

When applying the stuff, don't brush it on but sorth of dab it on with
the brush. Avoid brushing it aroound. Just glop it on generously in
one small area at at a time. This used more product and thats the
idea, to maximize the quantitiy of product per given area thus
maximizing effectiveness.

Rather than try to remove the gunk immediatly, wait carefully, testing
the first area you treated. Use a sharp scraper to just check the
corner until you see the paint bubbling or coming up.

If the stripper starts to dry out before it becomes effective, just dab
some more on there and wait longer. Brush it around as little as
possible if at all . Dabbing rather than brushing allows you to get
more strippper on a given area. Do not try to remove the strippper or
paint until a small test area gives way. Be patient until it is
obvious that the undesireable paint has been affected by the stripper.
then and only then you may proceed but only with areas that are
obviously affected by the stripper. Clean up with mineral spirits.

Lawrence



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Default Paint Stripper again -- they're not all the same

On 08/28/06 03:21 pm I wrote:

Now that the temp. has dropped below 70 again, I've been trying to strip
paint off the outside of a steel entry door again, but after half an
hour, except for the odd small patches where paint is coming off when I
scrape it, all that's coming off is a clear film (presumably the dried
stripper) leaving the paint underneath virtually unscathed.

The previous owners left none of this paint behind (they left others),
so I have no idea what it is. Supposing it is an epoxy? Would that
behave the way I'm seeing, and would that indicate that some
extra-strength stripper is needed?


I was using Bix Original Stripper, as sold by Sherwin Williams.

I tried Klean-Strip KS-3 Premium, as recommended by the guy in my local
Lowe's, and it is far, far better: in most places the old paint is
coming off in sheets after 15 minutes or so.

Perce
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