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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Thanks,

Radium

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current




On 10/7/06 22:43, in article
, "Radium"
wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?



Calculate the required frequency.

--

Relf's Law? -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
"Bull**** repeated to the limit of infinity asymptotically approaches
the odour of roses."
Corollary -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
³It approaches the asymptote faster, the more Œpseduos¹ you throw in
your formulas.²
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
³Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions. The classical
theory of gravity - Einstein's general relativity - is the subject
of this book.² : Hartle/ Gravity pg 1
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Jaffa cakes. Sweet delicious orange jaffa goodness, and an abject lesson
why parroting information from the web will not teach you cosmology.
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+





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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

On 10 Jul 2006 14:43:51 -0700, "Radium" wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Thanks,

Radium




In theory it should work - build an oscillator that works at that
frequency and it would give off light. Hertz proved the connection
with his experiments with microwaves. The same techniques used to
reflect and refract light work with radio waves

Now for practical considerations . . . Think about how small 510
nanometers really is. The resonant cavity in a magnetron, as a way to
generate light, would have to be on the order of 510 nm. Not possible
with present technology and not likely to be in the near future.

Someday, perhaps a shortcut could be found - will it replace other
light sources?

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

"default" wrote in message
...
Now for practical considerations . . . Think about how small 510
nanometers really is. The resonant cavity in a magnetron, as a way to
generate light, would have to be on the order of 510 nm.


Meh, only about 4,000 silicon (or copper) atoms.

You could even use a stock atomic force scanning, tunneling microscope probe
as an emitter.

Construct a couple million of these moderately large molecules, hook them up
to some carbon nanotubes and you've got a pretty nice LED I'm guessing.

Ooh, and it could even be tweaked into a phased array I bet...the
possibilities are kickass...

Tim
s
--
Deep Fryer: a very philosophical monk.
Website: http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms




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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Radium wrote:
Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Thanks,

Radium


http://www.google.com/search?q=terah...start =0&sa=N

Sue...

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

Radium wrote:
Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Thanks,

Radium


See: http://www.google.com/search?q=c%2F510nm
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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons.


go the other way, use a large 1 Hz generator to generate a Giant Fat 1Hz
Photon


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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?


Light is electromagnetic radiation, right? An "AC electric
current that has frequency high enough to have a wavelength
of 510 nm" would BE green light. You need to think about
how high-frequency AC (meaning radio frequencies and
higher) actually gets piped around.


Bob M.


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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Bob Myers wrote:
"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?



Light is electromagnetic radiation, right?


Light is electromagnetic radiation, yes. However, light is not
electricity. Electricity and electromagnetism are two totally different
things.

An "AC electric
current that has frequency high enough to have a wavelength
of 510 nm" would BE green light.


No. The human eye cannot see electric current. It can see
electromagnetic radiation at the "visible light" range of frequencies.
However, electric current -- at any frequency -- is always invisible to
the human eye.

Think of a sound analogy. We can hear mechanical vibrations between
20-20K hz approx. However, we cannot hear electric current at any
frequency, can we.

Just like that, we can see electromagnetic radiation in the "visibile
light" frequencies but we cannot see their electrical equivalent.

Electricity by itself is totally invisible and inaudible.

You need to think about
how high-frequency AC (meaning radio frequencies and
higher) actually gets piped around.


Bob M.




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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

In sci.physics Radium wrote:
Hi:


Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?


AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?



Thanks,


Radium


Sure, you just need really small tools to put the antenna together...

--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.
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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Norm Grimpo wrote:
"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons.


go the other way, use a large 1 Hz generator to generate a Giant Fat 1Hz
Photon


I just messed my pants from laughing too hard.

Thank you.
Markus.

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Phineas T Puddleduck wrote:
On 11/7/06 03:04, in article
, "Radium"
wrote:

crap

Some helpful advice if you are thinking of going into physics.

Don't.


I was pointing out to Bob Myers that we cannot see electric current
even if it oscillates at a frequency in the "visible light" range. What
is so incorrect about that?

If an electric current oscillates at a frequency in the "visible light"
spectrum, then we can see photons emitted as a result of the
oscillating electric current but we can't see the electric current
itself. Am I right?

--

Relf's Law? -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
"Bull**** repeated to the limit of infinity asymptotically approaches
the odour of roses."
Corollary -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
³It approaches the asymptote faster, the more Œpseduos¹ you throw in
your formulas.²
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
³Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions. The classical
theory of gravity - Einstein's general relativity - is the subject
of this book.² : Hartle/ Gravity pg 1
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Jaffa cakes. Sweet delicious orange jaffa goodness, and an abject lesson
why parroting information from the web will not teach you cosmology.
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+


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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

In article . com,
Radium wrote:

Phineas T Puddleduck wrote:
On 11/7/06 03:04, in article
, "Radium"
wrote:

crap

Some helpful advice if you are thinking of going into physics.

Don't.


I was pointing out to Bob Myers that we cannot see electric current
even if it oscillates at a frequency in the "visible light" range. What
is so incorrect about that?

If an electric current oscillates at a frequency in the "visible light"
spectrum, then we can see photons emitted as a result of the
oscillating electric current but we can't see the electric current
itself. Am I right?


Lets just say that your previous musings on science have been less than
inspiring.

--
Relf's Law? -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
"Bull**** repeated to the limit of infinity asymptotically approaches
the odour of roses."
Corollary -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
³It approaches the asymptote faster, the more Œpseduos¹ you throw in
your formulas.²
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
³Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions. The classical
theory of gravity - Einstein's general relativity - is the subject
of this book.² : Hartle/ Gravity pg 1
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Jaffa cakes. Sweet delicious orange jaffa goodness, and an abject lesson
why parroting information from the web will not teach you cosmology.
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+


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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

On 10 Jul 2006 14:43:51 -0700, "Radium"
wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Thanks,

Radium


Try:

http://www.nsls.bnl.gov/about/history/

for a description of visible synchrotron radiation.

Regards,

Bill Ward
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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

On 2006-07-10, Radium wrote:
Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm?


In theory

Has this ever been done before?


You'd need a frequency of around 580THz.

Bye.
Jasen
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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

On a sunny day (10 Jul 2006 14:43:51 -0700) it happened "Radium"
wrote in
.com:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Boring twit...
'nm' is a size, so and frequency is expressed in Hz.

So does your car go 10 cycles per gallon?

So you are talking about a _wavelength_ of 510nm.
1 meter = 300 MHz = 300 000 000 Hz
1 nm = 300 000 000 000 000 000 Hz (nano is a factor 10^-9) = 300 000 Tera Hertz
T M K

Now maybe you think you can buy a a 300 000 THz xtal... hehe ;-)

Anyways you can make 510 nm wavelength with 60 Hz AC:
Just use 6V 60Hz and a 510nm LED, and a series resistor.

Wow, also works with DC.
Without a series resistor it will work for a shorter time,

Now for a start try to calculate for a peak current of 20mA and a 1.5V
drop in the LED, and LET US KNOW before your next space science idea.

Any math ****ups here are intended



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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Radium wrote:
Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Thanks,

Radium


1m = c.sec/299,792,458

This is the new definition of the meter. Far more accurate than
scratches on a bar in Paris. This is approached using non linear
dielectrics and beat frequencies rather that Terahertz AC directly.
Distance can be much more accurately measured using an interferometer
than by any other method. Beats can be directly converted into AC but
not light directly.

In communicaton Terahertz fibers work on the principle of having a
number of lasers each with a slightly different frequency. You have
just GHz on each laser.

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Jan Panteltje wrote:
On a sunny day (10 Jul 2006 14:43:51 -0700) it happened "Radium"
wrote in
.com:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Boring twit...
'nm' is a size, so and frequency is expressed in Hz.


Yes. What I was trying to say is an "AC current whose frequency is high
enough to directly produce electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength of
510 nm".

Sorry for the misinformation.

So does your car go 10 cycles per gallon?

So you are talking about a _wavelength_ of 510nm.
1 meter = 300 MHz = 300 000 000 Hz
1 nm = 300 000 000 000 000 000 Hz (nano is a factor 10^-9) = 300 000 Tera Hertz
T M K

Now maybe you think you can buy a a 300 000 THz xtal... hehe ;-)

Anyways you can make 510 nm wavelength with 60 Hz AC:
Just use 6V 60Hz and a 510nm LED, and a series resistor.

Wow, also works with DC.
Without a series resistor it will work for a shorter time,

Now for a start try to calculate for a peak current of 20mA and a 1.5V
drop in the LED, and LET US KNOW before your next space science idea.

Any math ****ups here are intended


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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Bill Ward wrote:
On 10 Jul 2006 14:43:51 -0700, "Radium"
wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Thanks,

Radium


Try:

http://www.nsls.bnl.gov/about/history/

for a description of visible synchrotron radiation.

Regards,

Bill Ward


Is it practical to make synchrotron lasers? A synchrotron laser use a
synchrotron as the source that emits light. The synchrotron is inside
the laser. The laser has two mirrors on each end. One is a
full-reflective mirror, the other is a partial-silvered mirror that
partially reflects and partially lets light out. Light of a certain
wavelength is emitted from the synchrotron, this light hits both
mirrors thereby reflecting continuously, the coherent light then leaves
the partial-silvered mirror.

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


"Radium" wrote in message
ups.com...

Bob Myers wrote:
"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?



Light is electromagnetic radiation, right?


Light is electromagnetic radiation, yes. However, light is not
electricity.


Correct - but you conveniently missed the rest of my
comments, apparently. Which we

You need to think about
how high-frequency AC (meaning radio frequencies and
higher) actually gets piped around.


Again, you DO need to think really hard about
how HIGH-FREQUENCY (RF, microwaves, etc.) EM is
normally routed around. Is it "electricity," or is it better viewed
as a situation involving guided EM waves? Both models have
their advantages, but you'll find that as you get higher and
higher in frequency, the latter becomes much more useful -
certainly by the time you're NEEDING things like coaxial
cables and certainly waveguides.

If you're making electrons wiggle such that you're talking
a 510 nm free-space wavelength, expect to have green
light involved...

Bob M.


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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


"Radium" wrote in message
ups.com...

I was pointing out to Bob Myers that we cannot see electric current
even if it oscillates at a frequency in the "visible light" range. What
is so incorrect about that?


Simply that you clearly do not understand the relationship
between what you're calling "electric current" and
"electromagnetic radiation." These two are not the clearly-
distinguished things that you seem to think they are, esp.
at the very high frequencies.

Bob M.





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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current



Bill Ward wrote:

Try:

http://www.nsls.bnl.gov/about/history/

for a description of visible synchrotron radiation.


My favorite light show:
http://zpinch.sandia.gov/

Bill Ward


Best, Dan.

--
"We need an energy policy that encourages consumption"
George W. Bush.

"Conservation may be a sign of personal virtue, but it is not a
sufficient basis for a sound, comprehensive energy policy."
Vice President Dick Cheney

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 17:35:48 GMT, Dan Bloomquist
wrote:

snip

My favorite light show:
http://zpinch.sandia.gov/

Best, Dan.

Thanks, Dan. That's a very nice link. I wasn't even aware
of the work on fusion with the Z machine.

As an aside - I wonder what the image exposure time was.


Regards,

Bill Ward
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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

On 11 Jul 2006 09:51:16 -0700, "Radium"
wrote:


Bill Ward wrote:
On 10 Jul 2006 14:43:51 -0700, "Radium"
wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?


Thanks,

Radium


Try:

http://www.nsls.bnl.gov/about/history/

for a description of visible synchrotron radiation.

Regards,

Bill Ward


Is it practical to make synchrotron lasers? A synchrotron laser use a
synchrotron as the source that emits light. The synchrotron is inside
the laser. The laser has two mirrors on each end. One is a
full-reflective mirror, the other is a partial-silvered mirror that
partially reflects and partially lets light out. Light of a certain
wavelength is emitted from the synchrotron, this light hits both
mirrors thereby reflecting continuously, the coherent light then leaves
the partial-silvered mirror.


First find out what a synchrotron is and why it radiates.
Then maybe you can ask a question that makes more sense.

Regards,

Bill Ward




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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current



Bill Ward wrote:

On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 17:35:48 GMT, Dan Bloomquist
wrote:

snip

My favorite light show:
http://zpinch.sandia.gov/

Best, Dan.


Thanks, Dan. That's a very nice link. I wasn't even aware
of the work on fusion with the Z machine.

As an aside - I wonder what the image exposure time was.


Hi Bill,
My guess is that they open the shutter and pull the trigger.

From this:
http://www.sandia.gov/media/z290.htm

They are dumping 10kwh into the load in just some billionths of a
second. That is some short flash for such a large construct.

Bill Ward


Best, Dan.

--
"We need an energy policy that encourages consumption"
George W. Bush.

"Conservation may be a sign of personal virtue, but it is not a
sufficient basis for a sound, comprehensive energy policy."
Vice President Dick Cheney

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

Basically the process used for laser diodes to make light is the same as for
the Magnetron tubes for microwave.
Got enough newsgroups in the list? Bet you're on the alt.electronics NG
which I don't have.
--
Why do penguins walk so far to get to their nesting grounds?




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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 17:30:48 GMT, "Bob Myers"
wrote:


"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...

Bob Myers wrote:
"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?


Light is electromagnetic radiation, right?


Light is electromagnetic radiation, yes. However, light is not
electricity.


Correct - but you conveniently missed the rest of my
comments, apparently. Which we

You need to think about
how high-frequency AC (meaning radio frequencies and
higher) actually gets piped around.


Again, you DO need to think really hard about
how HIGH-FREQUENCY (RF, microwaves, etc.) EM is
normally routed around. Is it "electricity," or is it better viewed
as a situation involving guided EM waves? Both models have
their advantages, but you'll find that as you get higher and
higher in frequency, the latter becomes much more useful -
certainly by the time you're NEEDING things like coaxial
cables and certainly waveguides.

If you're making electrons wiggle such that you're talking
a 510 nm free-space wavelength, expect to have green
light involved...

Bob M.

I've been reading this thread and the above answer made me think of a
question. I'm a rank amateur so I hope this question isn't too silly
but here goes: When an antenna is used to recieve radio waves is it
the same as using a transparent material, fiber optic for example, to
recieve visible light? Or even a good anology?
Thanks,
Eric
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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


"Mark Fortune" wrote in message
...
Hmm, if light travels at a nice round figure of 300,000,000m/s, a 510nm
wavelength has a frequency of 300,000,000 / 0.00000051 =
588,235,294,117,647Hz = 588.24THz (is that right? ive only just woken up
so my maths is a little shakey). Now that's a pretty crazy frequency to
run any electronics project at if you ask me, and I suspect that unless
you were using some exotic superconducting material, you would have a
massive problem with inductance and capacitance in your good old copper
wires. might work on silicon though I dont know.


Well, that's kinda the point - in part, at least. But what I was
trying to get across to our "friend" Radium is that the higher
you go in frequency, the worse the model of "electricity is the
movement of electrons in conductors" looks, and the better the
model of "the metal bits are just there to guide the EM" looks -
and eventually you get to the point where you're basically
seeing everything as a waveguide. (Or another way to look
at it - the higher the frequency, the shorter the distance you
want to carry "electrical" signals in conductors, and the more
you rely on "pipes" to carry the signal long distances.) The
point of "you really need to be using a waveguide to carry this
any distance at all" happens at a frequency that's still considerably
below that form of EM that we call "visible light," but there is
really no difference in *kind* between light and a microwave RF
signal. Hence the earlier comment that if you somehow COULD
be making "electricity" with a wavelength of 510 nm, it WOULD
already result in "green light."

Bob M.


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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

Bob Myers wrote:
"Radium" wrote in message
oups.com...


Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?



Light is electromagnetic radiation, right? An "AC electric
current that has frequency high enough to have a wavelength
of 510 nm" would BE green light. You need to think about
how high-frequency AC (meaning radio frequencies and
higher) actually gets piped around.


Bob M.



Hmm, if light travels at a nice round figure of 300,000,000m/s, a 510nm
wavelength has a frequency of 300,000,000 / 0.00000051 =
588,235,294,117,647Hz = 588.24THz (is that right? ive only just woken up
so my maths is a little shakey). Now that's a pretty crazy frequency to
run any electronics project at if you ask me, and I suspect that unless
you were using some exotic superconducting material, you would have a
massive problem with inductance and capacitance in your good old copper
wires. might work on silicon though I dont know.
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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current



Bob Myers wrote:


Well, that's kinda the point - in part, at least. But what I was
trying to get across to our "friend" Radium is that the higher
you go in frequency, the worse the model of "electricity is the
movement of electrons in conductors" looks, and the better the
model of "the metal bits are just there to guide the EM" looks -
and eventually you get to the point where you're basically
seeing everything as a waveguide. (Or another way to look
at it - the higher the frequency, the shorter the distance you
want to carry "electrical" signals in conductors, and the more
you rely on "pipes" to carry the signal long distances.) The
point of "you really need to be using a waveguide to carry this
any distance at all" happens at a frequency that's still considerably
below that form of EM that we call "visible light," but there is
really no difference in *kind* between light and a microwave RF
signal. Hence the earlier comment that if you somehow COULD
be making "electricity" with a wavelength of 510 nm, it WOULD
already result in "green light."


But you don't have a handle on the reality????

--
"We need an energy policy that encourages consumption"
George W. Bush.

"Conservation may be a sign of personal virtue, but it is not a
sufficient basis for a sound, comprehensive energy policy."
Vice President Dick Cheney

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Radium wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?



There have been zillions of replies which all miss the point entirely.
It is of no practical use to make green light with high frequency AC
current - what you need is a steady green light which is best
(steadiest) using smoothed DC.
For this a green source of DC electricity is required - viable methods
of producing green electricity is currently attracting much attention
and research funding throughout the western world.
I am sure it will not be long before such green electricity is
commonplace.

What, I am sure, Radium has cleverly alluded to (and hence started the
discussion upon) is the fact that upon the arrival of plentiful green
electricity, and hence green light, the world will look a very odd
place : in fact it will look green when sunlight is not available.
This is (I am sure) Radiums point.
Many are involved in the search for truly green electricity but we
really also need red and blue counterparts to produce white light and
all its variants.
NOBODY APPEARS TO BE RESEARCHING INTO RED AND BLUE ELECTRICITY. We must
act now before it is too late



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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

RHRRC wrote:
Radium wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?



There have been zillions of replies which all miss the point entirely.
It is of no practical use to make green light with high frequency AC
current - what you need is a steady green light which is best
(steadiest) using smoothed DC.
For this a green source of DC electricity is required - viable methods
of producing green electricity is currently attracting much attention
and research funding throughout the western world.
I am sure it will not be long before such green electricity is
commonplace.

What, I am sure, Radium has cleverly alluded to (and hence started the
discussion upon) is the fact that upon the arrival of plentiful green
electricity, and hence green light, the world will look a very odd
place : in fact it will look green when sunlight is not available.
This is (I am sure) Radiums point.
Many are involved in the search for truly green electricity but we
really also need red and blue counterparts to produce white light and
all its variants.
NOBODY APPEARS TO BE RESEARCHING INTO RED AND BLUE ELECTRICITY. We must
act now before it is too late


The demise of the eastern block has pretty much ended research into red
electricity, although some interesting work continues to comes out of
the more hard line schools in China. Blue electricity however, is just
too sad to contemplate.

--
jeff
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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


jeff wrote:
RHRRC wrote:
Radium wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?



There have been zillions of replies which all miss the point entirely.
It is of no practical use to make green light with high frequency AC
current - what you need is a steady green light which is best
(steadiest) using smoothed DC.
For this a green source of DC electricity is required - viable methods
of producing green electricity is currently attracting much attention
and research funding throughout the western world.
I am sure it will not be long before such green electricity is
commonplace.

What, I am sure, Radium has cleverly alluded to (and hence started the
discussion upon) is the fact that upon the arrival of plentiful green
electricity, and hence green light, the world will look a very odd
place : in fact it will look green when sunlight is not available.
This is (I am sure) Radiums point.
Many are involved in the search for truly green electricity but we
really also need red and blue counterparts to produce white light and
all its variants.
NOBODY APPEARS TO BE RESEARCHING INTO RED AND BLUE ELECTRICITY. We must
act now before it is too late


The demise of the eastern block has pretty much ended research into red
electricity, although some interesting work continues to comes out of
the more hard line schools in China. Blue electricity however, is just
too sad to contemplate.

--
jeff


I am sure that were there sufficient a number of eminent scientists
charged with working on the problem both red and blue electricity would
come to one or more of them in a flash.

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


"jeff" wrote in message
news:dLdtg.10809$Ep.10795@trnddc08...
RHRRC wrote:
Radium wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?



There have been zillions of replies which all miss the point entirely.
It is of no practical use to make green light with high frequency AC
current - what you need is a steady green light which is best
(steadiest) using smoothed DC.
For this a green source of DC electricity is required - viable methods
of producing green electricity is currently attracting much attention
and research funding throughout the western world.
I am sure it will not be long before such green electricity is
commonplace.

What, I am sure, Radium has cleverly alluded to (and hence started the
discussion upon) is the fact that upon the arrival of plentiful green
electricity, and hence green light, the world will look a very odd
place : in fact it will look green when sunlight is not available.
This is (I am sure) Radiums point.
Many are involved in the search for truly green electricity but we
really also need red and blue counterparts to produce white light and
all its variants.
NOBODY APPEARS TO BE RESEARCHING INTO RED AND BLUE ELECTRICITY. We must
act now before it is too late


The demise of the eastern block has pretty much ended research into red
electricity, although some interesting work continues to comes out of
the more hard line schools in China. Blue electricity however, is just
too sad to contemplate.

--
jeff


I think you'll find that blue electricity is easy to generate. The problem
is that it doesn't interact well with fuses.

Tim Ward


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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current


Tim Ward wrote:
"jeff" wrote in message
news:dLdtg.10809$Ep.10795@trnddc08...
RHRRC wrote:
Radium wrote:

Hi:

Green light has a wavelength of about 510 nm. Is it possible to
generate green light using an AC electric current that has frequency
high enough to have a wavelength of 510 nm? Has this ever been done
before?

AFAIK, an AC current generates electromagnetic waves of the same
frequency of the current. In USA, electric power generators radiate 60
Hz photons. I would think it is possible to produce green light using
an AC current that has a frequency of 510 nm. Am I right?



There have been zillions of replies which all miss the point entirely.
It is of no practical use to make green light with high frequency AC
current - what you need is a steady green light which is best
(steadiest) using smoothed DC.
For this a green source of DC electricity is required - viable methods
of producing green electricity is currently attracting much attention
and research funding throughout the western world.
I am sure it will not be long before such green electricity is
commonplace.

What, I am sure, Radium has cleverly alluded to (and hence started the
discussion upon) is the fact that upon the arrival of plentiful green
electricity, and hence green light, the world will look a very odd
place : in fact it will look green when sunlight is not available.
This is (I am sure) Radiums point.
Many are involved in the search for truly green electricity but we
really also need red and blue counterparts to produce white light and
all its variants.
NOBODY APPEARS TO BE RESEARCHING INTO RED AND BLUE ELECTRICITY. We must
act now before it is too late


The demise of the eastern block has pretty much ended research into red
electricity, although some interesting work continues to comes out of
the more hard line schools in China. Blue electricity however, is just
too sad to contemplate.

--
jeff


I think you'll find that blue electricity is easy to generate. The problem
is that it doesn't interact well with fuses.

Tim Ward


By "blue" electricity, I assume you are talking about the bluish-white
light that is generated when electricity is at a high-enough voltage to
pass through air. As the current passes through the air, the air heats
up to temperatures adequate enough to produce a bluish-white light.
This light, however, is incandescent, and nothing to do with the
production of light I am referring to. When I was talking about
electrically-generating 510 nm light, my description was to use an AC
generator that outputs extremely high frequency AC current that gives
of electromagnetic waves at 510 nm. As other posters have pointed out,
the electric current would have to change direction [alternate] at
around 580 trillion times a second. AC current almost always produces
electromagnetic radiation at the same frequency.

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Default Generating green light using a 510 nm AC current

In article . com,
Radium wrote:

I think you'll find that blue electricity is easy to generate. The problem
is that it doesn't interact well with fuses.

Tim Ward


By "blue" electricity, I assume you are talking about the bluish-white
light that is generated when electricity is at a high-enough voltage to
pass through air.


Are you real?

--
Relf's Law? -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
"Bull**** repeated to the limit of infinity asymptotically approaches
the odour of roses."
Corollary -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
³It approaches the asymptote faster, the more Œpseduos¹ you throw in
your formulas.²
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
³Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions. The classical
theory of gravity - Einstein's general relativity - is the subject
of this book.² : Hartle/ Gravity pg 1
-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Jaffa cakes. Sweet delicious orange jaffa goodness, and an abject lesson
why parroting information from the web will not teach you cosmology.
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