Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old February 6th 05, 03:35 AM
Darren
 
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Default AT PSU changeover to ATX PSU. Power button-buy one?

Hi

My spare PC is in an AT case. It's currently powered by a 200w AT power
supply.

The motherboard has AT and ATX connectors. The mobo is an Epox EP-58
MVP3C-M and has power connectors for both AT and ATX cases.

I'm taking out the generic AT 200w power supply as it's getting old and I
have a new 400w ATX power supply to put in.

The AT PSU has a power cord which runs to a button on the front of the case.

The ATX PSU does not have a power cord with a button attached to it.

I've noticed the mobo has a 2 pin connector labelled 'POWER-ON'.

After installing the new ATX PSU, is it a case of buying a power button with
two wires that go to the 2 pin 'POWER-ON' connector?

If so, I'm not sure which pin will be positive and which will be negative
and I'm not sure my mobo manual tells me...

I suppose that electronics shops would stock these buttons.

I'm from downunder, if that helps with PC component location advice.

Thanks heaps

Darren





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Old February 6th 05, 04:15 AM
Sam Goldwasser
 
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Default

As they say: "If it ain't broke, why fix it"?

What's wrong with an old supply if it does the job? Unless there are
problems, or you are seriously expanding it, a new power supply won't
make it run better.

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"Darren" writes:

Hi

My spare PC is in an AT case. It's currently powered by a 200w AT power
supply.

The motherboard has AT and ATX connectors. The mobo is an Epox EP-58
MVP3C-M and has power connectors for both AT and ATX cases.

I'm taking out the generic AT 200w power supply as it's getting old and I
have a new 400w ATX power supply to put in.

The AT PSU has a power cord which runs to a button on the front of the case.

The ATX PSU does not have a power cord with a button attached to it.

I've noticed the mobo has a 2 pin connector labelled 'POWER-ON'.

After installing the new ATX PSU, is it a case of buying a power button with
two wires that go to the 2 pin 'POWER-ON' connector?

If so, I'm not sure which pin will be positive and which will be negative
and I'm not sure my mobo manual tells me...

I suppose that electronics shops would stock these buttons.

I'm from downunder, if that helps with PC component location advice.

Thanks heaps

Darren

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Old February 6th 05, 04:29 AM
Bob Urz
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Darren wrote:

Hi

My spare PC is in an AT case. It's currently powered by a 200w AT power
supply.

The motherboard has AT and ATX connectors. The mobo is an Epox EP-58
MVP3C-M and has power connectors for both AT and ATX cases.

I'm taking out the generic AT 200w power supply as it's getting old and I
have a new 400w ATX power supply to put in.

The AT PSU has a power cord which runs to a button on the front of the case.

The ATX PSU does not have a power cord with a button attached to it.

I've noticed the mobo has a 2 pin connector labelled 'POWER-ON'.

After installing the new ATX PSU, is it a case of buying a power button with
two wires that go to the 2 pin 'POWER-ON' connector?

If so, I'm not sure which pin will be positive and which will be negative
and I'm not sure my mobo manual tells me...

I suppose that electronics shops would stock these buttons.

I'm from downunder, if that helps with PC component location advice.

Thanks heaps

Darren


perhaps you can recycle the unused "Turbo" button......


Bob



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Old February 6th 05, 05:01 AM
James Sweet
 
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Default


"Sam Goldwasser" wrote in message
...
As they say: "If it ain't broke, why fix it"?

What's wrong with an old supply if it does the job? Unless there are
problems, or you are seriously expanding it, a new power supply won't
make it run better.



Either way to answer the question, polarity doesn't matter for the
pushbutton, any momentary button will work, all it does is connect the two
wires together when you press it.


  #5   Report Post  
Old February 6th 05, 05:02 AM
James Sweet
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Bob Urz" wrote in message
...


Darren wrote:

Hi

My spare PC is in an AT case. It's currently powered by a 200w AT power
supply.

The motherboard has AT and ATX connectors. The mobo is an Epox EP-58
MVP3C-M and has power connectors for both AT and ATX cases.

I'm taking out the generic AT 200w power supply as it's getting old and

I
have a new 400w ATX power supply to put in.

The AT PSU has a power cord which runs to a button on the front of the

case.

The ATX PSU does not have a power cord with a button attached to it.

I've noticed the mobo has a 2 pin connector labelled 'POWER-ON'.

After installing the new ATX PSU, is it a case of buying a power button

with
two wires that go to the 2 pin 'POWER-ON' connector?

If so, I'm not sure which pin will be positive and which will be

negative
and I'm not sure my mobo manual tells me...

I suppose that electronics shops would stock these buttons.

I'm from downunder, if that helps with PC component location advice.

Thanks heaps

Darren


perhaps you can recycle the unused "Turbo" button......


That would work except that usually that's a latching button, though the
latch mechanism may be removable. Could use the reset button as well but
then of course you lose the reset function.




  #6   Report Post  
Old February 6th 05, 05:02 AM
Darren
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Good idea bob. I'll look at that.

As far as replacing, fair comment Sam but the old one has no essential
functions for failure, overload etc and the new one has and was free.

Thanks

Darren

"Bob Urz" wrote in message
...


Darren wrote:

Hi

My spare PC is in an AT case. It's currently powered by a 200w AT power
supply.

The motherboard has AT and ATX connectors. The mobo is an Epox EP-58
MVP3C-M and has power connectors for both AT and ATX cases.

I'm taking out the generic AT 200w power supply as it's getting old and

I
have a new 400w ATX power supply to put in.

The AT PSU has a power cord which runs to a button on the front of the

case.

The ATX PSU does not have a power cord with a button attached to it.

I've noticed the mobo has a 2 pin connector labelled 'POWER-ON'.

After installing the new ATX PSU, is it a case of buying a power button

with
two wires that go to the 2 pin 'POWER-ON' connector?

If so, I'm not sure which pin will be positive and which will be

negative
and I'm not sure my mobo manual tells me...

I suppose that electronics shops would stock these buttons.

I'm from downunder, if that helps with PC component location advice.

Thanks heaps

Darren


perhaps you can recycle the unused "Turbo" button......


Bob



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Old February 6th 05, 05:04 AM
Darren
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I was hoping polarity wasn't an issue. Thanks very much.


"James Sweet" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Sam Goldwasser" wrote in message
...
As they say: "If it ain't broke, why fix it"?

What's wrong with an old supply if it does the job? Unless there are
problems, or you are seriously expanding it, a new power supply won't
make it run better.



Either way to answer the question, polarity doesn't matter for the
pushbutton, any momentary button will work, all it does is connect the two
wires together when you press it.




  #8   Report Post  
Old February 6th 05, 03:25 PM
Ken
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Darren wrote:
Good idea bob. I'll look at that.

As far as replacing, fair comment Sam but the old one has no essential
functions for failure, overload etc and the new one has and was free.

Thanks

Darren

"Bob Urz" wrote in message
...


Darren wrote:


Hi

My spare PC is in an AT case. It's currently powered by a 200w AT power
supply.

The motherboard has AT and ATX connectors. The mobo is an Epox EP-58
MVP3C-M and has power connectors for both AT and ATX cases.

I'm taking out the generic AT 200w power supply as it's getting old and


I

have a new 400w ATX power supply to put in.

The AT PSU has a power cord which runs to a button on the front of the


case.

The ATX PSU does not have a power cord with a button attached to it.

I've noticed the mobo has a 2 pin connector labelled 'POWER-ON'.

After installing the new ATX PSU, is it a case of buying a power button


with

two wires that go to the 2 pin 'POWER-ON' connector?

If so, I'm not sure which pin will be positive and which will be


negative

and I'm not sure my mobo manual tells me...

I suppose that electronics shops would stock these buttons.

I'm from downunder, if that helps with PC component location advice.

Thanks heaps

Darren



perhaps you can recycle the unused "Turbo" button......


Bob



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet


News==----

http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+


Newsgroups

----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption


=----



Some MBs that accept either an AT or ATX PS have a jumper or switch
that must be set depending upon which type you use. You should check
your MB literature for such information.
  #9   Report Post  
Old February 7th 05, 06:18 PM
jakdedert
 
Posts: n/a
Default

James Sweet wrote:
"Bob Urz" wrote in message
...


Darren wrote:

Hi

My spare PC is in an AT case. It's currently powered by a 200w AT
power supply.

The motherboard has AT and ATX connectors. The mobo is an Epox
EP-58 MVP3C-M and has power connectors for both AT and ATX
cases.

I'm taking out the generic AT 200w power supply as it's getting old
and I have a new 400w ATX power supply to put in.

The AT PSU has a power cord which runs to a button on the front of
the case.

The ATX PSU does not have a power cord with a button attached to it.

I've noticed the mobo has a 2 pin connector labelled 'POWER-ON'.

After installing the new ATX PSU, is it a case of buying a power
button with two wires that go to the 2 pin 'POWER-ON' connector?

If so, I'm not sure which pin will be positive and which will be
negative and I'm not sure my mobo manual tells me...

I suppose that electronics shops would stock these buttons.

I'm from downunder, if that helps with PC component location advice.

Thanks heaps

Darren


perhaps you can recycle the unused "Turbo" button......


That would work except that usually that's a latching button, though
the latch mechanism may be removable. Could use the reset button as
well but then of course you lose the reset function.


Yeah, but the ATX supply doesn't really seem to mind if you hold the button
down for a bit when cycling it on or off (on all the ones I have, you must
hold the button down for a few seconds to turn off, but mostly 'power off'
is under software control, anyway). I expect the OP could use the original
power switch from the AT supply--or the turbo button--as long as he 'cycled'
it instead of simply turning it on or off.

jak




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