Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old March 10th 19, 05:06 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,156
Default Identify IC ?

RIFAR540
RD6416 N
Could be 1 instead of I , and N probably refers to the plastic
encapsulation. 14 pin IC in the power supply section of some 1979 kit.

  #2   Report Post  
Old March 10th 19, 07:31 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,156
Default Identify IC ?

On 10/03/2019 16:06, N_Cook wrote:
RIFAR540
RD6416 N
Could be 1 instead of I , and N probably refers to the plastic
encapsulation. 14 pin IC in the power supply section of some 1979 kit.


Until I can power-up probe/explore trackside, my guess is perhaps , from
the "16", a variant of CMOS quad analogue sw.

  #3   Report Post  
Old March 10th 19, 10:13 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,156
Default Identify IC ?

On 10/03/2019 18:31, N_Cook wrote:
On 10/03/2019 16:06, N_Cook wrote:
RIFAR540
RD6416 N
Could be 1 instead of I , and N probably refers to the plastic
encapsulation. 14 pin IC in the power supply section of some 1979 kit.


Until I can power-up probe/explore trackside, my guess is perhaps , from
the "16", a variant of CMOS quad analogue sw.


pins 1,3,5 and 13 seem of the same type or function, inputs or outputs
or control lines from another board, so could be quad an. sw.
A stepped range of supply volts or amps would make some sense for a
step-wise variable drive.
  #4   Report Post  
Old March 11th 19, 06:44 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 706
Default Identify IC ?

On 2019/03/10 2:13 p.m., N_Cook wrote:
On 10/03/2019 18:31, N_Cook wrote:
On 10/03/2019 16:06, N_Cook wrote:
RIFAR540
RD6416 N
Could be 1 instead of I , and N probably refers to the plastic
encapsulation. 14 pin IC in the power supply sectionÂ* of some 1979 kit.


Until I can power-up probe/explore trackside, my guess is perhaps , from
the "16",Â* a variant of CMOS quad analogue sw.


pins 1,3,5 and 13 seem of the same type or function, inputs or outputs
or control lines from another board, so could be quad an. sw.
A stepped range of supply volts or amps would make some sense for a
step-wise variable drive.


UA/LM741 was a common regulator back then and came in a 14 pin DIP, but
it doesn't match your description of particular pins. Where is your
device relative to the pass transistor? Does it drive the base or the
[ass transistor or does it drive another transistor that perhaps drives
the base?

What equipment is it used in? You say some kit, more info may help if
one of us has the schematics...

John :-#)#

--
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
John's Jukes Ltd.
MOVED to #7 - 3979 Marine Way, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5J 5E3
(604)872-5757 (Pinballs, Jukes, Video Games)
www.flippers.com
"Old pinballers never die, they just flip out."

  #5   Report Post  
Old March 11th 19, 07:49 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2014
Posts: 984
Default Identify IC ?


John Robertson wrote:



UA/LM741 was a common regulator back then and came in a 14 pin DIP,



** Huh ??

Surely you mean the uA/LM723 adjustable regulator.

The LM741 is a most famous op-amp.




.... Phil




  #6   Report Post  
Old March 11th 19, 10:04 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,156
Default Identify IC ?

On 11/03/2019 05:44, John Robertson wrote:
On 2019/03/10 2:13 p.m., N_Cook wrote:
On 10/03/2019 18:31, N_Cook wrote:
On 10/03/2019 16:06, N_Cook wrote:
RIFAR540
RD6416 N
Could be 1 instead of I , and N probably refers to the plastic
encapsulation. 14 pin IC in the power supply section of some 1979 kit.

Until I can power-up probe/explore trackside, my guess is perhaps , from
the "16", a variant of CMOS quad analogue sw.


pins 1,3,5 and 13 seem of the same type or function, inputs or outputs
or control lines from another board, so could be quad an. sw.
A stepped range of supply volts or amps would make some sense for a
step-wise variable drive.


UA/LM741 was a common regulator back then and came in a 14 pin DIP, but
it doesn't match your description of particular pins. Where is your
device relative to the pass transistor? Does it drive the base or the
[ass transistor or does it drive another transistor that perhaps drives
the base?

What equipment is it used in? You say some kit, more info may help if
one of us has the schematics...

John :-#)#


The 14A of these EDM

http://www.aga-museum.nl/page/geodimeter-model-12-

The external V reg for 12V car battery down to 6V failed decades ago ,
repairing that, there was still a fault inside.
Powering up these days all the amber nixie segments light on test,
signal LEDs light , servo neutral density filter rotates, a shutter
moves but no cue tone on the audio and simple IR phototransistor+red LED
zapper tester shows no IR output.
Getting inside and isolating (perhaps, not wanting to disturb the fixing
of the sub-board in its screened box as all optically aligned)
the Tx GaAs diode cold tests as likely functional.
Next thing (as 4 densely packed boards of TTL and CMOS and rather too
many "after-thought"/mod flying components including a 14 pin IC)
is fit back together , expanded with standoffs, to be able to probe the
PS area.
But stepped supply to the Tx diode makes operational sense.
The only tech material i've found is this general principles of
operation of such EDM of that time.
It has some provenance, owned by Ordnance Survey the premier map-makers
in the UK, until something went wrong with it and they entered it into
one of their then regular auctions of surplus stuff.

  #7   Report Post  
Old March 11th 19, 10:09 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,156
Default Identify IC ?

On 11/03/2019 09:04, N_Cook wrote:
The only tech material i've found is this general principles of
operation of such EDM of that time.


omission

http://www.sage.unsw.edu.au/sites/sage/files/SAGE_collection/MonographSeries/mono7.pdf


  #8   Report Post  
Old March 11th 19, 02:12 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,156
Default Identify IC ?

Harris semiconductor had a series run in 70s of RD*** and did loads of
an sw variants in 80s/90s, perhaps RD6416.
There is certainly 4 "channels" associated with it , a resistor
different values , BC107 pre-driver and a TO220 driver/pass transistor
repeated 4 times.
  #9   Report Post  
Old March 11th 19, 05:31 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 706
Default Identify IC ?

On 2019/03/10 11:49 p.m., Phil Allison wrote:

John Robertson wrote:



UA/LM741 was a common regulator back then and came in a 14 pin DIP,



** Huh ??

Surely you mean the uA/LM723 adjustable regulator.

The LM741 is a most famous op-amp.




.... Phil



Thanks Phil, of course I meant the 723. That is why you should never
post after an evening of wine...

John :-#(#
  #10   Report Post  
Old March 11th 19, 10:31 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2014
Posts: 984
Default Identify IC ?

John Robertson wrote:

Phil Allison wrote:



UA/LM741 was a common regulator back then and came in a 14 pin DIP,



** Huh ??

Surely you mean the uA/LM723 adjustable regulator.

The LM741 is a most famous op-amp.




Thanks Phil, of course I meant the 723. That is why you should never
post after an evening of wine...



** Back in the early 1970s, I put together a bench PSU for myself using an LM723 plus 2N3055 pass transistor.

The 723 was in the then common TO100 round, gold lead pak.

https://gridchoice.com/shop/can-type...-to100-10.html


I still have and use the PSU.

With the addition of a few upgrades, it does 2.2 to 20V at 2 amps with continuously variable current limit from 100mA up.



..... Phil








Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Identify this carpentry tool? -= debully =- UK diy 6 April 30th 04 02:50 PM
Down to earth - can you identify tonight's mystery switch gear? John Rumm UK diy 21 April 21st 04 10:23 AM
Flat Roof Identify Material and Repair Method TheScullster UK diy 3 March 19th 04 07:18 PM
Help to identify a florry tube. Dave Plowman UK diy 7 September 27th 03 11:53 AM
Identify a bolt thread Essjay001 UK diy 13 August 7th 03 12:04 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:23 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017