Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?

--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831-336-2558
# http://802.11junk.com
#
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com AE6KS
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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?

--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831-336-2558
# http://802.11junk.com
#
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com AE6KS


Can you get it apart far enough to put the panels through the dishwasher
a few times?

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
ElectroOptical Innovations LLC
Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics

160 North State Road #203
Briarcliff Manor NY 10510
845-480-2058

hobbs at electrooptical dot net
http://electrooptical.net
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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

In article ,
Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?


I've had pretty good success with mineral spirits, but sometimes it
takes a while. First, make sure there's not a left-over plastic film on
top of the adhesive -- if there is, the solvent won't do anything.

Get a folded rag pretty damp with the spirits and drape it over the
printer (you may have to do this one side at the time). As you said,
sometimes the goo just won't dissolve, but it will get soft, so go after
it with a toothbrush (to loosen) and a nearly dry paper towel (to wipe
up); it will load up with goo and need to be replaced fairly often.

Also, *carefully applied* heat can do wonders; many of the adhesives
that are rock hard at room temperature soften up nicely after a few
minutes in front of an incandescent bulb in a reflector. If you can do
the heat trick first, it's often possible to pull the stickers off
intact, especially if you peel slooooowly.

Or, I suppose you could just take it to Earl Scheib 8^}

Isaac
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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

Jeff Liebermann wrote in message
...
I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?

--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831-336-2558
# http://802.11junk.com
#
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com AE6KS




I always start with a hot air gun on low heat and finger nails (not
simultaneously)


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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

On 3/14/2012 11:21 PM, isw wrote:
In ,
Jeff wrote:

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?


Or, I suppose you could just take it to Earl Scheib 8^}

Isaac


That was my thought, just paint over it.
Mikek



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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

I'm surprised Goo-Gone won't remove it.

Ditto for MEK. That'll dissolve anything -- including your lungs.


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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover


"Jeff Liebermann" schreef in bericht
...
I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?

--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831-336-2558
# http://802.11junk.com
#
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com AE6KS


I always use white spirit though it might be too strong for the plastics
involved. Some stronger solvents usually tend to damage the surface so I
kept away from them. If anyone ever used a solvent that solves the plastic
only slightly, part of the dirt may be catched in the surface and (almost)
impossible to remove.

petrus bitbyter


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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

On Mar 14, 7:07*pm, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. *I soon discovered why it was so cheap. *A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. *Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. *Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. *All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. *I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?

--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831-336-2558
#http://802.11junk.com* * * * * * *
#http://www.LearnByDestroying.com* * * * * * * AE6KS


Jeff,

You're right in the area:

the Plastics experts for YEARS! These guys KNOW plastic.


San Leandro HQ 510 357 3755

TAP Plastics (408) 292 8685
1212 The Alameda
San Jose, CA 95125

TAP Plastics Inc (408) 265-6400
1008 Blossom Hill Rd # F
San Jose, CA 95123

TAP Plastics Inc (650) 962-8430
312 Castro St
Mtn View, CA 94041

http://www.tapplastics.com
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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

On Wed, 14 Mar 2012 19:07:24 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?


Should take less than one can of spray paint -- choose your favorite
color at an auto supply store...

Jonesy

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On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 00:05:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs
wrote:

Can you get it apart far enough to put the panels through the dishwasher
a few times?
Cheers
Phil Hobbs


Yes, but I'm not sure a dishwasher is such a great idea. The ABS
plastic will probably melt in the dishwasher. I also tried hot water
and laundry detergent, without much luck.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


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On Wed, 14 Mar 2012 21:21:13 -0700, isw wrote:

I've had pretty good success with mineral spirits, but sometimes it
takes a while.


I haven't tried mineral spirits, but I'll give it a try. So far, I
have about 2-3 hours of brute force cleaning. I'm making progress,
but so far, it still looks "dirty".

First, make sure there's not a left-over plastic film on
top of the adhesive -- if there is, the solvent won't do anything.


No film. This is genuine, uncoated, ABS.

Get a folded rag pretty damp with the spirits and drape it over the
printer (you may have to do this one side at the time). As you said,
sometimes the goo just won't dissolve, but it will get soft, so go after
it with a toothbrush (to loosen) and a nearly dry paper towel (to wipe
up); it will load up with goo and need to be replaced fairly often.


Good idea. I've been using paper towels, but I think I can get more
force and deeper into the surface finish with a rag and brush. At
this point, a toothbrush is probably too weak. A laundry brush might
be better.

Also, *carefully applied* heat can do wonders; many of the adhesives
that are rock hard at room temperature soften up nicely after a few
minutes in front of an incandescent bulb in a reflector. If you can do
the heat trick first, it's often possible to pull the stickers off
intact, especially if you peel slooooowly.


I don't want to try heat quite yet. I'm afraid of melting the dirt
into the "textured" surface.

Or, I suppose you could just take it to Earl Scheib 8^}


Too late. They closed up in 2010.
http://www.earlscheib.com

This is more interesting:
http://retr0bright.wikispaces.com/
http://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/2009-02-12-de-yellowing%20recipe.htm
I've been experimenting with small plastic parts and getting mixed
results.
--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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On 15 Mar 2012 14:15:13 GMT, Allodoxaphobia
wrote:

Should take less than one can of spray paint -- choose your favorite
color at an auto supply store...
Jonesy


Great idea. Too bad the paint probably won't stick to the remaining
goo on the plastic.

I didn't bother to take a photo before I started, but here's the eBay
page:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/130659281942
See the 4 photos furthur down the page. The top cover looked "dirty"
in the photo, which I presumed would be easy to clean. I didn't
realize it was sticky goo residue, impervious to various mild
chemicals. What's not obvious from the photo is that the entire top,
and both sides were coated with the thin layer of the same sticky goo.
It's far worse than it looks in the photos. There were tiny bits of
bumper sticker material left attached to the sticky goo, which is a
clue as to what happened.

On the good side, the price is right, it prints cleanly, is in quite
good condition inside, has done well at 160,000 page, included an
apparently good Jetdirect card, and included a "Bar Codes and More"
ROM. Now, if I can only get it to look nice.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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On Mar 15, 8:44*am, Jeff Liebermann wrote:


I didn't bother to take a photo before I started, but here's the eBay
page:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/130659281942
See the 4 photos furthur down the page. *The top cover looked "dirty"
in the photo, which I presumed would be easy to clean. *I didn't
realize it was sticky goo residue, impervious to various mild
chemicals. *What's not obvious from the photo is that the entire top,
and both sides were coated with the thin layer of the same sticky goo.
It's far worse than it looks in the photos. *There were tiny bits of
bumper sticker material left attached to the sticky goo, which is a
clue as to what happened.

On the good side, the price is right, it prints cleanly, is in quite
good condition inside, has done well at 160,000 page, included an
apparently good Jetdirect card, and included a "Bar Codes and More"
ROM. *Now, if I can only get it to look nice.


Try advertising for a completely cashed-in model, and take the shell.

Or you might find one on the side of the road. Much to my annoyance,
no one sells plastic lampshades for torchieres. Years of incandescent
lightbulb heat caused ours to crack and chip. Searching for a
replacement went nowhere. I finally bought a bowl from a restaurant
supply store and drilled a hole in the bottom.

But then, on our Sunday morning latte walk, I found an entire
torchiere on the side of the road. I quickly unscrewed the shade and
took it home. It was proof the the Lord smiled upon out Sunday morning
ritual.
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I don't remember everything from the original post. Did you try MEK?


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On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 09:52:09 -0700, "William Sommerwerck"
wrote:

I don't remember everything from the original post. Did you try MEK?


No, and I won't try it. MEK eats most plastics including ABS. MEK
and acetone are sold as "plastic glue" which works by liquifying the
plastic. I don't want to try stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon
solvents.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


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I don't remember everything from the original post. Did you try MEK?

No, and I won't try it. MEK eats most plastics including ABS. MEK
and acetone are sold as "plastic glue" which works by liquifying the
plastic. I don't want to try stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon
solvents.


You're probably right, but... You can always test it on the inside.


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Jeff Liebermann wrote:

On Wed, 14 Mar 2012 21:21:13 -0700, isw wrote:

Or, I suppose you could just take it to Earl Scheib 8^}


Too late. They closed up in 2010.
http://www.earlscheib.com



Then go to MAACO, or use a rattlecan.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
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Jeff Liebermann wrote in
:

On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 00:05:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs
wrote:

Can you get it apart far enough to put the panels through the dishwasher
a few times?
Cheers
Phil Hobbs


Yes, but I'm not sure a dishwasher is such a great idea. The ABS
plastic will probably melt in the dishwasher. I also tried hot water
and laundry detergent, without much luck.



when you wash electronic stuff in the auto dishwasher(ADW),you must turn
off the drying heat.

remove the items and dry them outside the ADW.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
localnet
dot com
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When you wash electronic stuff in a dishwasher,
you must turn off the drying heat.


True, but... Just running cold water through the machine warms it, possibly
to the point where it can melt plastic. I learned this 50 years ago, when GE
supplied a clear plastic top to demo its "portable" dishwashers. You were
warned not to run the demo more than one cycle without letting the water
cool down.


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Phil Hobbs wrote:

Can you get it apart far enough to put the panels through the
dishwasher a few times?


The glue could gum up the pump and filter.

I'd stick to hand washing, maybe with Soft Scrub or other liquid abrasive.


--

Reply in group, but if emailing add one more
zero, and remove the last word.




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On Wed, 14 Mar 2012 19:07:24 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?


How about sandblasting the offending remnants?

There are moderately inexpensive kits for craft/hobby glass etching that
used "canned air" and also the only slightly more expensive Paasche "air
eraser" kit.

It's not going to be fast (the active spot is roughly 0804-sized) and if
the plastic has already been softened by solvents you might just end up
with dirtier plastic.

One (among many) vendors at
http://www.micromark.com/paasche-air...-set,9117.html

Looks like Harbor Freight has a knock-off (surprise!). Video over at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtBaG58P5gc

--
Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
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Something just crossed my mind... Is it possible that the adhesives in the
stickers attacked the ABS? That might explain why Goo-Gone doesn't work.


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On Wed, 14 Mar 2012 19:07:24 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual price.
I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had embalmed the
printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and rubber cement.
Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he just gave up
trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo is still
attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps make the goo
more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded in
the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?


Paintball goo yields to boiling water from a kettle.
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On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 14:05:10 -0400, Rich Webb
wrote:

How about sandblasting the offending remnants?


That would probably damage the "textured" plastic finish. Sandblasting
soft materials, like plastic, causes the sand to imbed itself into the
material. I learned this the hard way when I tried to sandblast a
brass welding torch. The sand is now a permanent part of the handle.

There are moderately inexpensive kits for craft/hobby glass etching that
used "canned air" and also the only slightly more expensive Paasche "air
eraser" kit.


Well, I have a Paasche air brush. Looks exactly like mine, except it
has a sand bin attached. I really don't want to run sand or glass
beads through the tiny nozzle. It also seems like it would take
several hours to do the job and probably won't remove the rubber goo.
My guess(tm) is that it will simply mix some sand into the rubber
surface goo, without actually removing anything.

It's not going to be fast (the active spot is roughly 0804-sized) and if
the plastic has already been softened by solvents you might just end up
with dirtier plastic.


Yep.

One (among many) vendors at
http://www.micromark.com/paasche-air...-set,9117.html

Looks like Harbor Freight has a knock-off (surprise!). Video over at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtBaG58P5gc


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 18:44:25 +0000 (UTC), Wond
wrote:

Paintball goo yields to boiling water from a kettle.


That's because most of the paintball goo is fish oil, glycerine, and
wax, all of which will melt nicely at fairly low temperatures. The
stuff I'm dealing with is probably a permanent pressure sensitive
adhesive, possibly self vulcanizing rubber plus an accelerator, which
is why it seems to be insoluble. Breaking cross link vulcanization
bonds is not easy. It's much like trying to remove RTV with solvents,
which won't work.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


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In article ,
Jeff Liebermann wrote:

How about sandblasting the offending remnants?


That would probably damage the "textured" plastic finish. Sandblasting
soft materials, like plastic, causes the sand to imbed itself into the
material. I learned this the hard way when I tried to sandblast a
brass welding torch. The sand is now a permanent part of the handle.


Could you take it to a commercial blaster? Any of several techniques
might work: bead blasting, bicarbonate blasting, CO2 pellet blasting.
These ought not to leave a residue, and I'd think that bead blasting
could reproduce a consistent surface texture across the exterior.

--
Dave Platt AE6EO
Friends of Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!
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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 11:46:03 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 14:05:10 -0400, Rich Webb
wrote:

How about sandblasting the offending remnants?


That would probably damage the "textured" plastic finish. Sandblasting
soft materials, like plastic, causes the sand to imbed itself into the
material. I learned this the hard way when I tried to sandblast a
brass welding torch. The sand is now a permanent part of the handle.

There are moderately inexpensive kits for craft/hobby glass etching that
used "canned air" and also the only slightly more expensive Paasche "air
eraser" kit.


Well, I have a Paasche air brush. Looks exactly like mine, except it
has a sand bin attached. I really don't want to run sand or glass
beads through the tiny nozzle.


Good grief, no indeed! The air eraser is airbrush-like in its operation
but the nozzle has a carbide throat and a larger opening.

It also seems like it would take
several hours to do the job and probably won't remove the rubber goo.
My guess(tm) is that it will simply mix some sand into the rubber
surface goo, without actually removing anything.


Hmmmm... maybe use some freeze-it spray to harden the goo?

It's not going to be fast (the active spot is roughly 0804-sized) and if
the plastic has already been softened by solvents you might just end up
with dirtier plastic.


Yep.


If the adhesive has chemically bonded to the underlying plastic, your
only option may be to just prime / sand / prime / repaint. There are
crafty tricks with sponges (black anti-static foam may be just right ;-)
to get a textured surface.

--
Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 08:44:09 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On 15 Mar 2012 14:15:13 GMT, Allodoxaphobia
wrote:

Should take less than one can of spray paint -- choose your favorite
color at an auto supply store...


Great idea. Too bad the paint probably won't stick to the remaining
goo on the plastic.

I didn't bother to take a photo before I started, but here's the eBay
page:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/130659281942
See the 4 photos furthur down the page. The top cover looked "dirty"
in the photo, which I presumed would be easy to clean. I didn't
realize it was sticky goo residue, impervious to various mild
chemicals. What's not obvious from the photo is that the entire top,
and both sides were coated with the thin layer of the same sticky goo.
It's far worse than it looks in the photos. There were tiny bits of
bumper sticker material left attached to the sticky goo, which is a
clue as to what happened.

On the good side, the price is right, it prints cleanly, is in quite
good condition inside, has done well at 160,000 page, included an
apparently good Jetdirect card, and included a "Bar Codes and More"
ROM. Now, if I can only get it to look nice.


Well, then ... chuckle ... get a handful of bumper stickers
that appeal to _you_ and slap'em on. :-)

Jonesy
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Default HP Laserjet bumper sticker remover

On Mar 15, 3:55*pm, Allodoxaphobia
wrote:
On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 08:44:09 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:


On the good side, the price is right, it prints cleanly, is in quite
good condition inside, has done well at 160,000 page, included an
apparently good Jetdirect card, and included a "Bar Codes and More"
ROM. *Now, if I can only get it to look nice.


Well, then ... chuckle ... get a handful of bumper stickers
that appeal to _you_ and slap'em on. * *:-)


Contact paper. I bet they still make fake woodgrain.
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In article ],
isw wrote:
In article ,
Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?


I've had pretty good success with mineral spirits, but sometimes it
takes a while. First, make sure there's not a left-over plastic film on
top of the adhesive -- if there is, the solvent won't do anything.

Get a folded rag pretty damp with the spirits and drape it over the
printer (you may have to do this one side at the time). As you said,
sometimes the goo just won't dissolve, but it will get soft, so go after
it with a toothbrush (to loosen) and a nearly dry paper towel (to wipe
up); it will load up with goo and need to be replaced fairly often.


My suggestion: take off the case parts, drape with paper towels or
rags and drizzle with soybean oil. Let soak for a while (a couple of
hours, depending on how stiff the glue is). Wipe off the softened gunk.
Then wash the parts with dish soap. Repeat...

Yea, we eat the stuff.

Mark Zenier
Googleproofaddress(account:mzenier provider:eskimo domain:com)




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On Mar 14, 9:07*pm, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. *I soon discovered why it was so cheap. *A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. *Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. *Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. *All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. *I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?

--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831-336-2558
#http://802.11junk.com* * * * * * *
#http://www.LearnByDestroying.com* * * * * * * AE6KS


I would put money on using naptha, it doesn't seem to affect most
plastics and dissolves almost all sticky ceMent residues. I USE IT
FOR EVERYTHING.
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On Wed, 14 Mar 2012 19:07:24 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

I bought an HP LaserJet 2300dtn on eBay for much less than usual
price. I soon discovered why it was so cheap. A past owner had
embalmed the printer in layers of bumper stickers, pogs, labels, and
rubber cement. Most of this was removed by the vendor, but I think he
just gave up trying to clean up the printer. Much of the glue and goo
is still attached to the printer, along with some dirt which helps
make the goo more visible.

I've tried alcohol, paint thinner, Goo Gone sticker lifter (citrus
power), Oops! remover, WD-40, ammonia cleaner, and 409. All of these
soften the gum and goo to various degrees, but leave enough imbedded
in the textured plastic surface to make the printer look filthy. I
hesitate to try a stronger chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent for fear of
destroying the ABS plastic.

Can anyone recommend a favorite solvent or cleaner for sticky goo and
gum?



It's probably residue from a sticker that they put on demo units in
the retail stores. The sticker lists the features of the printer, and
maybe the price. I have a Laserjet 8100 in the office that has
leftovers from the demo sticker that I have not been able to remove
for years. The coverage isn't nearly as great as that on your printer,
and it's out of the way, so nobody cares.

Over the years, the glue seemed to dry out and is now almost a powder,
but even the usual solvents won't break it. There are a few deep
scratches from someone trying to scrape the residue off.

Since this is a REPAIR group, you could actually replace the plastic
exterior pieces. You can find a comprehensive selection at
PARTSNOW.COM. I have ordered many internal parts and some cosmetic
pieces from them over the years.


Thanks.


Remove the BALONEY from my email address.
-----------------------------------------------------
Matthew Fries Minneapolis, MN USA


"Quit eating all my *STUFF*!" - The Tick
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On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 21:03:44 -0500, Matthew Fries
wrote:

It's probably residue from a sticker that they put on demo units in
the retail stores.


Nope. This printer has printed 160,000 pages. That must have been a
really long term demo. Judging by what little was left of the actual
label, it was probably a vinyl bumper sticker or multiple smaller
stickers.

The sticker lists the features of the printer, and
maybe the price. I have a Laserjet 8100 in the office that has
leftovers from the demo sticker that I have not been able to remove
for years. The coverage isn't nearly as great as that on your printer,
and it's out of the way, so nobody cares.


I've seen those on inkjets, laptops, and desktops. The stickers are
little better than graffiti. Many stickers seem to use some form of
"permanent" glue.

Over the years, the glue seemed to dry out and is now almost a powder,
but even the usual solvents won't break it. There are a few deep
scratches from someone trying to scrape the residue off.


I've also seen the same thing with some labels. The glue turns to
dust and the label falls off. However, the residue left on the
printer is difficult or impossible to remove.

Since this is a REPAIR group, you could actually replace the plastic
exterior pieces. You can find a comprehensive selection at
PARTSNOW.COM. I have ordered many internal parts and some cosmetic
pieces from them over the years.


I buy most of my printer parts either on eBay or from Printerworks. In
this case, the top cover is $33.
http://www.printerworks.com/Catalogs/HP-LaserJet-2300/105_2300TopCover.html
Seems expensive, but I may do that if I can't get the crud off.

I didn't work on the printer today as I was doing service calls.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 19:03:21 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

I would put money on using naptha, it doesn't seem to affect most
plastics and dissolves almost all sticky ceMent residues. I USE IT
FOR EVERYTHING.


That's Coleman camp fuel or white gas. Possibly a bad idea for ABS.

Chemical Compatibility Database
http://www.coleparmer.com/Chemical-Resistance
Select "ABS plastic" in the left column.
Select "Naptha" in the right column.
Click on "See Results"
The results say that it's a bad idea.

Another ABS chemical compatibility chart at:
http://www.k-mac-plastics.net/data%20sheets/abs_chemical_resistance.htm
says that naptha is ok when cool (20C), but will severely attack ABS
when hot (60C).

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 12:47:18 -0700, (Dave Platt)
wrote:

In article ,
Jeff Liebermann wrote:

How about sandblasting the offending remnants?


That would probably damage the "textured" plastic finish. Sandblasting
soft materials, like plastic, causes the sand to imbed itself into the
material. I learned this the hard way when I tried to sandblast a
brass welding torch. The sand is now a permanent part of the handle.


Could you take it to a commercial blaster? Any of several techniques
might work: bead blasting, bicarbonate blasting, CO2 pellet blasting.
These ought not to leave a residue, and I'd think that bead blasting
could reproduce a consistent surface texture across the exterior.


I could do that, but I would need to blast all the covers in order to
make the surface finish match. There are also some smooth surfaces
involved, which would need to be masked. I don't know the price of
sandblasting, but I suspect it might approach the cost of replacement.

I have a small sandblaster kit and air compressor. I've done plenty
of metal parts, but have never tried plastic. I'll see if I can find
some to sacrifice. Unfortunately, all I have handy is some fairly
coarse hard sand.

--
Jeff Liebermann

150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


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On Mar 15, 11:38*pm, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 19:03:21 -0700 (PDT), "

wrote:
I would put money on using naptha, it doesn't seem to affect most
plastics and dissolves almost all sticky ceMent residues. *I USE IT
FOR EVERYTHING.


That's Coleman camp fuel or white gas. *Possibly a bad idea for ABS.

Chemical Compatibility Database
http://www.coleparmer.com/Chemical-Resistance
* Select "ABS plastic" in the left column.
* Select "Naptha" in the right column.
* Click on "See Results"
The results say that it's a bad idea.

Another ABS chemical compatibility chart at:
http://www.k-mac-plastics.net/data%20sheets/abs_chemical_resistance.htm
says that naptha is ok when cool (20C), but will severely attack ABS
when hot (60C).

--
Jeff Liebermann * *
150 Felker St #D * *http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann * * AE6KS * *831-336-2558


isn't naptha lighter fluid from a smoke shop?
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After reading this thread, I'm inclined to feel that nothing can be done.
Specifically, the adhesives have so deeply attacked and/or bonded with the
styrene component of the ABS, that Nothing Can Be Done.

You can get a 4M cheap. Mine is 20+ years old and still running fine. It's
not as fast as newer machines, but the quality is impeccable. You should see
the way it prints the eensy-teensy text on Disney discount coupons. And it's
PostScript, which means that finding a usable driver is no problem.


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On Fri, 16 Mar 2012 06:41:06 -0700, "William Sommerwerck"
wrote:

After reading this thread, I'm inclined to feel that nothing can be done.
Specifically, the adhesives have so deeply attacked and/or bonded with the
styrene component of the ABS, that Nothing Can Be Done.


Ye of little faith. I think it's cleanable because I've cleaned
similar sticky rubberish goo from plastic in the past, without much
difficulty. The difference here is that the plastic surface is
textured, and seems to be trapping the goo. Cleaning a textured
surface is a problem that I see all too often. However, my quest for
the ultimate solvent may be futile. What I probably should be looking
for is a better technique or tools. I'll be investigating brushes,
rags, microfiber, mild heating, and such today. I think the various
label remover products are adequate.

You can get a 4M cheap. Mine is 20+ years old and still running fine. It's
not as fast as newer machines, but the quality is impeccable. You should see
the way it prints the eensy-teensy text on Disney discount coupons. And it's
PostScript, which means that finding a usable driver is no problem.


The LJ 4m is ancient. It's basically a repackaged LaserJet 4. 8ppm
is much too slow for my customers. The 2300 is 24 ppm and starts
printing about 8 seconds from standby. The 2300d will print on both
sides of the page at 1200dpi (with the PCL6 driver). It also does
Postscript 3. However, these are not why my customers buy my rebuilt
2200 and 2300 series printers. It's because in standby, they don't
make any fan noise, which means they can be left powered on at home.
If I arrived with an LJ 4m, my typical customer would question my
sanity.
http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/pscmisc/vac/us/product_pdfs/238800.pdf
Typical cost for a 2300d from eBay is $100. I replace all the rubber
parts for $15. A clone 10A 6000 page toner cart is about $25.
Jetdirect network card is $10-$50 depending on type. 128MB additional
RAM for $10. Total expense is usually about $150. I usually spend
about an hour cleaning it. Time to retire the LJ 4m.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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Jeff Liebermann wrote in
:

On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 12:47:18 -0700, (Dave Platt)
wrote:

In article ,
Jeff Liebermann wrote:

How about sandblasting the offending remnants?

That would probably damage the "textured" plastic finish. Sandblasting
soft materials, like plastic, causes the sand to imbed itself into the
material. I learned this the hard way when I tried to sandblast a
brass welding torch. The sand is now a permanent part of the handle.


Could you take it to a commercial blaster? Any of several techniques
might work: bead blasting, bicarbonate blasting, CO2 pellet blasting.
These ought not to leave a residue, and I'd think that bead blasting
could reproduce a consistent surface texture across the exterior.


I could do that, but I would need to blast all the covers in order to
make the surface finish match. There are also some smooth surfaces
involved, which would need to be masked. I don't know the price of
sandblasting, but I suspect it might approach the cost of replacement.

I have a small sandblaster kit and air compressor. I've done plenty
of metal parts, but have never tried plastic. I'll see if I can find
some to sacrifice. Unfortunately, all I have handy is some fairly
coarse hard sand.


what may happen is that the goo may act as a stencil,and you end up etching
all around the goo.

I wonder if you used the mineral spirits or GooGone with a plastic fiber
pad or "pot scrubber" and some elbow grease,if that would take the goo off.

or maybe it has to be "hot tanked"; soaked in a tank of heated
solvent.Maybe the stuff auto shops use to clean auto parts.....

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
localnet
dot com
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On Mar 16, 8:41*am, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Fri, 16 Mar 2012 06:41:06 -0700, "William Sommerwerck"

wrote:
After reading this thread, I'm inclined to feel that nothing can be done..
Specifically, the adhesives have so deeply attacked and/or bonded with the
styrene component of the ABS, that Nothing Can Be Done.


Ye of little faith. *I think it's cleanable because I've cleaned
similar sticky rubberish goo from plastic in the past, without much
difficulty. *The difference here is that the plastic surface is
textured, and seems to be trapping the goo. *Cleaning a textured
surface is a problem that I see all too often. *However, my quest for
the ultimate solvent may be futile. *What I probably should be looking
for is a better technique or tools. *I'll be investigating brushes,
rags, microfiber, mild heating, and such today. *I think the various
label remover products are adequate.

You can get a 4M cheap. Mine is 20+ years old and still running fine. It's
not as fast as newer machines, but the quality is impeccable. You should see
the way it prints the eensy-teensy text on Disney discount coupons. And it's
PostScript, which means that finding a usable driver is no problem.


The LJ 4m is ancient. *It's basically a repackaged LaserJet 4. *8ppm
is much too slow for my customers. *The 2300 is 24 ppm and starts
printing about 8 seconds from standby. *The 2300d will print on both
sides of the page at 1200dpi (with the PCL6 driver). *It also does
Postscript 3. *However, these are not why my customers buy my rebuilt
2200 and 2300 series printers. *It's because in standby, they don't
make any fan noise, which means they can be left powered on at home.
If I arrived with an LJ 4m, my typical customer would question my
sanity.
http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/pscmisc/vac/us/product_pdfs/238800.pdf
Typical cost for a 2300d from eBay is $100. *I replace all the rubber
parts for $15. *A clone 10A 6000 page toner cart is about $25.
Jetdirect network card is $10-$50 depending on type. *128MB additional
RAM for $10. *Total expense is usually about $150. *I usually spend
about an hour cleaning it. *Time to retire the LJ 4m.

--
Jeff Liebermann * *
150 Felker St #D * *http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann * * AE6KS * *831-336-2558


stick with the STIFF toothbrushes, they have rounded bristles and
don't seem to scratch much
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