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How to make small wedges?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 31st 04, 02:21 AM
Ollie
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Posts: n/a
Default How to make small wedges?

I am in process of making a series of wedged tenon joints and for that
purpose I need to have quite a many small wedges. First tried to do that
with my table saw were quite dangerous. I did try with the fence and with a
shop made sliding table. In both cases I had difficulties to keep the small
pieces in place. My third solution was to use the tenoning jig by tilting
the blade by 5 degree to prepare the wood blank for the wedges and then
slice the wood into strips of the same thickness as the tenon.

I am convinced that there is a better way, where you first slice the strips
and then make the wedges individually. The main problem is how to keep
those small pieces securely in place. If you make the wide wedges first,
then the difficulty is to slice the nonrectangular small pieces

What is your solution?

+++ Ollie


Ads
  #2  
Old August 31st 04, 02:48 AM
Matt
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Default

Here's your chance to justify a bandsaw

You will find that cutting irregular shapes and other cuts with a bandsaw
are not nearly as scary as with other tools.
Many have found that once you have a bandsaw, you find it invaluable in
day-to-day usage.

Personally , I have had a sears 12" 3 wheel bandsaw for about 7 years now,
and will be getting a 14" bandsaw in September.


"Ollie" wrote in message
...
I am in process of making a series of wedged tenon joints and for that
purpose I need to have quite a many small wedges. First tried to do that
with my table saw were quite dangerous. I did try with the fence and with

a
shop made sliding table. In both cases I had difficulties to keep the

small
pieces in place. My third solution was to use the tenoning jig by tilting
the blade by 5 degree to prepare the wood blank for the wedges and then
slice the wood into strips of the same thickness as the tenon.

I am convinced that there is a better way, where you first slice the

strips
and then make the wedges individually. The main problem is how to keep
those small pieces securely in place. If you make the wide wedges first,
then the difficulty is to slice the nonrectangular small pieces

What is your solution?

+++ Ollie




  #3  
Old August 31st 04, 03:19 AM
Bill Rogers
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 21:21:13 -0400, "Ollie"
wrote:

I am in process of making a series of wedged tenon joints and for that
purpose I need to have quite a many small wedges. First tried to do that
with my table saw were quite dangerous.


How small? How dangerous?

I make toaster tongs as on of the gifts for friends and family. The
bit of wood holding the side arms is about 1/2" long, and angled at 2
degrees per side. To do that, I cut across the grain ofa fairly wide
piece to the 1/2" depth. Then I set the miter [with extension]at the
required 2 deg angle, and feed into the saw, turn over for the next
cut, turn over for the next .... letting the pieces fall away. The
secret is that I leave a good size piece as scrap, and don't try to
cut ALL of the pieces from that original. You should be able to do
something similar.

Bill.

  #4  
Old August 31st 04, 03:29 AM
Denny
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Default

I found it was pretty easy on a table saw with this process:

1. Screw a large piece of wood to the miter gauge to anchor your wedge stock
to.
2. Use a comfortably sized piece of wood for the stock to cut the wedges
from, big enough to allow the next step.
3. Use a clamp (or 2) to attach the wedge stock to the miter gauge. Keep
the clamps away from the saw blade.
4. Keep your hands away from the wood you're cutting, just push the miter
gauge.
5. The wedges may be longer than you need, it's easy to trim them with a
hand saw.
6. Depending on the size of the pieces you're cutting, a zero-clearance
insert may be necessary.

Hope that helps, let me know if you have any questions...

Denny


"Ollie" wrote in message
...
I am in process of making a series of wedged tenon joints and for that
purpose I need to have quite a many small wedges. First tried to do that
with my table saw were quite dangerous. I did try with the fence and with

a
shop made sliding table. In both cases I had difficulties to keep the

small
pieces in place. My third solution was to use the tenoning jig by tilting
the blade by 5 degree to prepare the wood blank for the wedges and then
slice the wood into strips of the same thickness as the tenon.

I am convinced that there is a better way, where you first slice the

strips
and then make the wedges individually. The main problem is how to keep
those small pieces securely in place. If you make the wide wedges first,
then the difficulty is to slice the nonrectangular small pieces

What is your solution?

+++ Ollie




  #5  
Old August 31st 04, 03:35 AM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 21:21:13 -0400, "Ollie"
wrote:

I am in process of making a series of wedged tenon joints and for that
purpose I need to have quite a many small wedges. First tried to do that
with my table saw were quite dangerous. I did try with the fence and with a
shop made sliding table. In both cases I had difficulties to keep the small
pieces in place. My third solution was to use the tenoning jig by tilting
the blade by 5 degree to prepare the wood blank for the wedges and then
slice the wood into strips of the same thickness as the tenon.

I am convinced that there is a better way, where you first slice the strips
and then make the wedges individually. The main problem is how to keep
those small pieces securely in place. If you make the wide wedges first,
then the difficulty is to slice the nonrectangular small pieces

What is your solution?

+++ Ollie



how about a sawtooth shaped sled to hold them (hot glue?) for a run
through the thickness sander?
  #6  
Old August 31st 04, 05:56 AM
Jock
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Posts: n/a
Default

I use the sliding compound mitre saw myself. Just throw the bit left over
away & move to the next when you feel the fingertips being buzzed by the
blade.
Jock

"Ollie" wrote in message
...
| I am in process of making a series of wedged tenon joints and for that
| purpose I need to have quite a many small wedges. First tried to do that
| with my table saw were quite dangerous. I did try with the fence and with
a
| shop made sliding table. In both cases I had difficulties to keep the
small
| pieces in place. My third solution was to use the tenoning jig by tilting
| the blade by 5 degree to prepare the wood blank for the wedges and then
| slice the wood into strips of the same thickness as the tenon.
|
| I am convinced that there is a better way, where you first slice the
strips
| and then make the wedges individually. The main problem is how to keep
| those small pieces securely in place. If you make the wide wedges first,
| then the difficulty is to slice the nonrectangular small pieces
|
| What is your solution?
|
| +++ Ollie
|
|


  #7  
Old August 31st 04, 11:37 PM
Preston Andreas
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Posts: n/a
Default

I had to cut a bunch out of ebony for wedged tenons. I set my bandsaw fence
about 4" from the blade and ran a piece of plywood through. I then cut out
the wedge shape in the edge of the plywood that I just cut. Make sure the
wedge you cut out of the plywood, the width of the stock and the desired
length of the wedges are the same. Place the stock into the wedge and run
the plywood against the fence and cut off the first wedge. Flip the stock
over front to back and run again. This offsets the first angle cut into the
stock. Keep repeating for more wedges. It is an easy setup, fast and
plenty accurate for wedges. BTW, I cut mine at approx. 6.

Preston


"Ollie" wrote in message
...
I am in process of making a series of wedged tenon joints and for that
purpose I need to have quite a many small wedges. First tried to do that
with my table saw were quite dangerous. I did try with the fence and with

a
shop made sliding table. In both cases I had difficulties to keep the

small
pieces in place. My third solution was to use the tenoning jig by tilting
the blade by 5 degree to prepare the wood blank for the wedges and then
slice the wood into strips of the same thickness as the tenon.

I am convinced that there is a better way, where you first slice the

strips
and then make the wedges individually. The main problem is how to keep
those small pieces securely in place. If you make the wide wedges first,
then the difficulty is to slice the nonrectangular small pieces

What is your solution?

+++ Ollie




  #8  
Old September 1st 04, 01:07 AM
Ollie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

What method you are using to keep stock safely in the plywood jig?

My only reason to select 5 for the tenoning wedge was that it did look
"right" for a 4 slot. If the wedge is 6, what angle the slot should be?

+++ Ollie

"Preston Andreas" wrote in message
...
I had to cut a bunch out of ebony for wedged tenons. I set my bandsaw

fence
about 4" from the blade and ran a piece of plywood through. I then cut

out
the wedge shape in the edge of the plywood that I just cut. Make sure the
wedge you cut out of the plywood, the width of the stock and the desired
length of the wedges are the same. Place the stock into the wedge and run
the plywood against the fence and cut off the first wedge. Flip the stock
over front to back and run again. This offsets the first angle cut into

the
stock. Keep repeating for more wedges. It is an easy setup, fast and
plenty accurate for wedges. BTW, I cut mine at approx. 6.

Preston



  #9  
Old September 1st 04, 03:40 PM
Preston Andreas
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Posts: n/a
Default

You will find that finger pressure on the outboard end of the stock is
enough. Remember, there is no kickback; you only have to remember not to
run your finger through the blade. As the stock gets smaller, you can use a
notched stick to keep the stock firmly in the wedge. Try it and you will
find out it really is simple and a safer way to do it.

I chose 6 for the wedge angle out of thin air. I also cut the slot in the
tenon at 6. And, actually, these weren't exact, but fairly close. What I
wanted was the width of the wedge showing to be visually proportional to the
tenon. For my instance, 6 worked. I made the slot in the tenon the same
angle as the wedge because I was using a more brittle wood (mesquite and
bloodwood). If you are using a more bendable wood, you can make an angled
mortise and use the wedges to lock in the tenon.

Preston

"Ollie" wrote in message
...
What method you are using to keep stock safely in the plywood jig?

My only reason to select 5 for the tenoning wedge was that it did look
"right" for a 4 slot. If the wedge is 6, what angle the slot should be?

+++ Ollie

"Preston Andreas" wrote in message
...
I had to cut a bunch out of ebony for wedged tenons. I set my bandsaw

fence
about 4" from the blade and ran a piece of plywood through. I then cut

out
the wedge shape in the edge of the plywood that I just cut. Make sure

the
wedge you cut out of the plywood, the width of the stock and the desired
length of the wedges are the same. Place the stock into the wedge and

run
the plywood against the fence and cut off the first wedge. Flip the

stock
over front to back and run again. This offsets the first angle cut into

the
stock. Keep repeating for more wedges. It is an easy setup, fast and
plenty accurate for wedges. BTW, I cut mine at approx. 6.

Preston





  #10  
Old September 1st 04, 10:28 PM
Phisherman
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Posts: n/a
Default

Small hardwood wedges can be easily made using the bandsaw. If you
don't have a bandsaw, a dovetail saw will do. And yes, trying to cut
small parts on a tablesaw will lead to unpredictable projectiles !
However, the tablesaw blade can be lowered such that 1/16" thick wood
is left uncut, then break apart the pieces with a box cutter and hand
sand.

On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 21:21:13 -0400, "Ollie"
wrote:

I am in process of making a series of wedged tenon joints and for that
purpose I need to have quite a many small wedges. First tried to do that
with my table saw were quite dangerous. I did try with the fence and with a
shop made sliding table. In both cases I had difficulties to keep the small
pieces in place. My third solution was to use the tenoning jig by tilting
the blade by 5 degree to prepare the wood blank for the wedges and then
slice the wood into strips of the same thickness as the tenon.

I am convinced that there is a better way, where you first slice the strips
and then make the wedges individually. The main problem is how to keep
those small pieces securely in place. If you make the wide wedges first,
then the difficulty is to slice the nonrectangular small pieces

What is your solution?

+++ Ollie


 




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