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Keeping things from freezing



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 29th 08, 05:26 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 106
Default Keeping things from freezing

I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.

Simply store stuff in an old refrigerator? An ice chest? Build an
insulated cabinet with a temperature-controlled heat lamp?

Or maybe not worry about it. I haven't actually seen anything frozen,
but then, when I wasn't using the shop, I didn't go out there for
months at a time, so wouldn't have noticed.

Moving the stuff into the house wouldn't be convenient because of the
distance to the garage.
Ads
  #2  
Old September 29th 08, 05:40 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,619
Default Keeping things from freezing


"Richard Evans" wrote in message
...
I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.

Simply store stuff in an old refrigerator? An ice chest? Build an
insulated cabinet with a temperature-controlled heat lamp?

Or maybe not worry about it. I haven't actually seen anything frozen,
but then, when I wasn't using the shop, I didn't go out there for
months at a time, so wouldn't have noticed.

Moving the stuff into the house wouldn't be convenient because of the
distance to the garage.


A box with a couple light bulbs will do the trick. The reason you use two
light bulbs is in case one burns out.



  #3  
Old September 29th 08, 06:01 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 2,387
Default Keeping things from freezing

Richard Evans wrote:
I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.


Drop by http://www.builditsolar.com and take a look at DIY solar panels
- and visit http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html to see the /easy/ way
to keep your shop (and you) warm and cozy all winter long. :-)

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/
  #4  
Old September 29th 08, 06:22 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 9,135
Default Keeping things from freezing


"Richard Evans" wrote in message
I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.


Considering your unheated shop situation, there may be times when you need
to do a winter glue-up in the kitchen, if you can get away with it, and the
temperature of the stock and glue will both be important in cold weather.

My shop is also unheated ... I buy Titebond by the quart, transfer some to a
smaller glue bottles that go out to the shop most of the year around, but I
keep the big bottles in my office so that I always have fresh glue around at
optimum temperature.


--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/18/08
KarlC@ (the obvious)


  #5  
Old September 29th 08, 06:44 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 182
Default Keeping things from freezing

On Mon, 29 Sep 2008 12:26:34 -0400, Richard Evans
wrote:

I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.

Simply store stuff in an old refrigerator? An ice chest? Build an
insulated cabinet with a temperature-controlled heat lamp?

Or maybe not worry about it. I haven't actually seen anything frozen,
but then, when I wasn't using the shop, I didn't go out there for
months at a time, so wouldn't have noticed.

Moving the stuff into the house wouldn't be convenient because of the
distance to the garage.


I have an old freezer that gave up the ghost. I took out the switch
and diconected the compressor. now when I plug it in only the 15 watt
bulb comes on and stays on. no freezing problems in the last 3 years.
I'm also in N.C. when the wheather is going to be below freezing I
plug it in and leave it untill it warms up. I have to replace the bulb
once or twice a year.

skeez
  #6  
Old September 29th 08, 07:58 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 106
Default Keeping things from freezing

Morris Dovey wrote:

Richard Evans wrote:
I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.


Drop by http://www.builditsolar.com and take a look at DIY solar panels
- and visit http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html to see the /easy/ way
to keep your shop (and you) warm and cozy all winter long. :-)


The garage is over 1200 square feet. As much as I would like to, I
have no intention of heating the whole thing,

  #7  
Old September 29th 08, 08:03 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 106
Default Keeping things from freezing

"Lee Michaels" wrote:


"Richard Evans" wrote in message
.. .
I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.

Simply store stuff in an old refrigerator? An ice chest? Build an
insulated cabinet with a temperature-controlled heat lamp?

Or maybe not worry about it. I haven't actually seen anything frozen,
but then, when I wasn't using the shop, I didn't go out there for
months at a time, so wouldn't have noticed.

Moving the stuff into the house wouldn't be convenient because of the
distance to the garage.


A box with a couple light bulbs will do the trick. The reason you use two
light bulbs is in case one burns out.


That's my first choice. I'd add a temperature-sensitive switch, like
those used in greenhouses, and only turn the bulbs on when necessary.
My only concern there is potential fire hazard. Perhaps I'd line the
box with drywall.

I have a cheap particle-board cupboard that's big enough. I could
mount the bulbs in the bottom and drill some holes in the shelves to
let the warm air rise more freely.

  #8  
Old September 29th 08, 08:08 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 9,135
Default Keeping things from freezing



"Richard Evans" wrote

The garage is over 1200 square feet. As much as I would like to, I
have no intention of heating the whole thing,


Nice drive-by ... you suck, regardless of temperature.


--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/18/08
KarlC@ (the obvious)


  #9  
Old September 29th 08, 08:51 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 631
Default Keeping things from freezing

On Mon, 29 Sep 2008 12:26:34 -0400, Richard Evans
wrote:

I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.

Simply store stuff in an old refrigerator? An ice chest? Build an
insulated cabinet with a temperature-controlled heat lamp?

Or maybe not worry about it. I haven't actually seen anything frozen,
but then, when I wasn't using the shop, I didn't go out there for
months at a time, so wouldn't have noticed.

Moving the stuff into the house wouldn't be convenient because of the
distance to the garage.



I stick the latex stuff under my saw outfeed table, and hang a trouble
light with a 100 watt bulb. Nothing has ever frozen to my knowledge.
My shop well insulated but not heated except with a portable propane
radiant.

Frank
  #10  
Old September 29th 08, 09:43 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 6,062
Default Keeping things from freezing

On Sep 29, 12:26*pm, Richard Evans wrote:
I live in North Carolina where winters are mild. Rarely are there long
stretches of below freezing temperatures. My shop is in an unheated
garage, a hundred feet from the house. It fell into disuse a number of
years ago, and when I revived it last Spring I threw out all the latex
paint, Elmer's glue, etc. on the assumption that, at some time, it had
been frozen. I've been restocking, and now that Fall is here I'm
thinking of ways to keep the new stuff from freezing.

Simply store stuff in an old refrigerator? *An ice chest? Build an
insulated cabinet with a temperature-controlled heat lamp?

Or maybe not worry about it. I haven't actually seen anything frozen,
but then, when I wasn't using the shop, I didn't go out there for
months at a time, so wouldn't have noticed.

Moving the stuff into the house wouldn't be convenient because of the
distance to the garage.


You can often find waterbed heaters at thrift shops. they are
thermostatically controlled and able to operate on a very low wick. As
such, the power draw is minimal.
 




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