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Slope on bath drain pipe.



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 1st 12, 06:17 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 275
Default Slope on bath drain pipe.

I plan to install a new upstairs bathroom toilet, basin and bath. All
three items will be on the same exterior wall. The basin is between the
bath and the toilet.

If I connect the bath drain to the toilet soil drain pipe, outside just
below the bath, a distance of about 8 foot, how much slope do I need?

Is it OK to connect the basin drain to the middle of the above pipe or
should I have a separate connection to the soil pipe? The latter option
would certainly prevent any water from the basin trying to enter the bath.


--
Michael Chare
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  #2  
Old October 1st 12, 11:14 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 15,182
Default Slope on bath drain pipe.

On 01/10/2012 18:17, Michael Chare wrote:
I plan to install a new upstairs bathroom toilet, basin and bath. All
three items will be on the same exterior wall. The basin is between the
bath and the toilet.

If I connect the bath drain to the toilet soil drain pipe, outside just
below the bath, a distance of about 8 foot, how much slope do I need?

Is it OK to connect the basin drain to the middle of the above pipe or
should I have a separate connection to the soil pipe? The latter option
would certainly prevent any water from the basin trying to enter the bath.


This has chapter and verse on all these subjects:

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/bui...parth/approved



--
Cheers,

John.

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  #3  
Old October 1st 12, 11:22 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 4,116
Default Slope on bath drain pipe.

On 01/10/2012 18:17, Michael Chare wrote:
I plan to install a new upstairs bathroom toilet, basin and bath. All
three items will be on the same exterior wall. The basin is between the
bath and the toilet.

If I connect the bath drain to the toilet soil drain pipe, outside just
below the bath, a distance of about 8 foot, how much slope do I need?

Is it OK to connect the basin drain to the middle of the above pipe or
should I have a separate connection to the soil pipe? The latter option
would certainly prevent any water from the basin trying to enter the bath.


If feasible, I would have separate connections to the soil pipe. I
didn't and, whilst there is no real problem, I would not do so again. I
feel it was a bit sloppy.

--
Rod
  #4  
Old October 1st 12, 11:56 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 18,440
Default Slope on bath drain pipe.

Michael Chare wrote:
I plan to install a new upstairs bathroom toilet, basin and bath. All
three items will be on the same exterior wall. The basin is between the
bath and the toilet.

If I connect the bath drain to the toilet soil drain pipe, outside just
below the bath, a distance of about 8 foot, how much slope do I need?

Is it OK to connect the basin drain to the middle of the above pipe or
should I have a separate connection to the soil pipe? The latter option
would certainly prevent any water from the basin trying to enter the bath.


at least 1:100 1:60 is better, and more is OK but watch out for TOO big
a flow actually sucking the U bend an trap dry. Or add an air
admittance valve to it

If you can guarantee that only water is going down it and not solids
that might collect it needs no slope at all. It can even go up - its
just another U bend then :-)


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(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.
  #5  
Old October 2nd 12, 07:01 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,623
Default Slope on bath drain pipe.

On Oct 1, 6:16*pm, Michael Chare mUNDERSCOREnews@chareDOTorgDOTuk
wrote:
I plan to install a new upstairs bathroom toilet, basin and bath. All
three items will be on the same exterior wall. The basin is between the
bath and the toilet.

If I connect the bath drain to the toilet soil drain pipe, outside just
below the bath, *a distance of about 8 foot, how much slope do I need?

Is it OK to connect the basin drain to the middle of the above pipe or
should I have a separate connection to the soil pipe? The latter option
would certainly prevent any water from the basin trying to enter the bath..

--
Michael Chare


The optimum slope is 1:30. but not critical for wash basins. (Steeper
rather than shallower)
Separate connections are better. There's less chance of one trap
"sucking the other out"
Be sure to install cleaning points in the pipework so you can clear
out any future blockages. Or use some compression fittings that can
be parted for this purpose.

  #6  
Old October 2nd 12, 03:33 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,181
Default Slope on bath drain pipe.

On 01/10/2012 23:56, The Natural Philosopher wrote:


If you can guarantee that only water is going down it and not solids
that might collect it needs no slope at all. It can even go up - its
just another U bend then :-)

Yes, but you can't! Bits of human hair inevitably get into bath and
basin water - and these will collect at low points, and ultimately cause
blockages. It's important to make sure that any long straight pipe has a
downwards slope along its whole length, and doesn't have any dips in the
middle.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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  #7  
Old October 2nd 12, 09:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 275
Default Slope on bath drain pipe.

On 02/10/2012 07:01, harry wrote:

Be sure to install cleaning points in the pipework so you can clear
out any future blockages. Or use some compression fittings that can
be parted for this purpose.

That is an idea I had not thought of!

Thanks for all the replies.


--
Michael Chare
 




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