A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » UK diy
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 29th 06, 07:00 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 102
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?

Hi,

We have a 10-ish year old Zanussi Freezer which we would like to relocate
outside (under shelter but open-air...and therefore susceptible to low
temperatures from time to time.).

The manual states: "If the room temperature falls below freezing point the
freezer will not function as it should".

Can anybody explain the above statement in more detail, please? I really do
not understand why a modern freezer shouldn't work when outside.

Thanks,

David



Ads
  #2  
Old August 29th 06, 07:13 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,367
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?

I've seen this on a fridge with icebox. Basically the thermostat is
saying "it's cold enough" so the fridge compressor hardly ever starts.
That means that although the fridge portion may be cold enough (because
the thermostat says so), the freezer doessn't (because it relies on the
compressor running for the main fridge). A seperate freezer unit may be
fine though.

  #3  
Old August 29th 06, 07:14 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,232
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?

Vortex wrote:

We have a 10-ish year old Zanussi Freezer which we would like to relocate
outside (under shelter but open-air...and therefore susceptible to low
temperatures from time to time.).

The manual states: "If the room temperature falls below freezing point the
freezer will not function as it should".

Can anybody explain the above statement in more detail, please? I really do
not understand why a modern freezer shouldn't work when outside.


See mucho discussion of this in the archives of this ng:
http://tinyurl.com/o93at or
http://groups.google.co.uk/groups/search?hl=en&lr=&safe=off&num=10&q=freezer+garage+ temperature+group%3Auk.d-i-y&safe=off&qt_s=Search

IIRC the problem is primarily when you have a combined fridge freezer
with only one thermostat / compressor - ambient temp falls to below
normal fridge temp (~4 deg C), so the thermostat shuts the thing down
regardless of the fact that the freezer section still needs cooling.

We have separate 'overflow' fridge and freezer in our garage - I think
both have warnings against such 'abuse' - but both have work fine for
several years.

David
  #4  
Old August 29th 06, 08:32 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,212
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?


"Lobster" wrote in message
...
Vortex wrote:


We have separate 'overflow' fridge and freezer in our garage - I think
both have warnings against such 'abuse' - but both have work fine for
several years.


Same here. In a shed with an open window so that it doesn't get too hot.

Mary

David



  #5  
Old August 29th 06, 08:37 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 142
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?

"Vortex" wrote:
Hi,

We have a 10-ish year old Zanussi Freezer which we would like to relocate
outside (under shelter but open-air...and therefore susceptible to low
temperatures from time to time.).

The manual states: "If the room temperature falls below freezing point
the freezer will not function as it should".

Can anybody explain the above statement in more detail, please? I really
do not understand why a modern freezer shouldn't work when outside.

Thanks,

David


Whether it works or not, if sited outdoors, condensation will accelerate
rusting of the cabinet. May not matter in view of its age.


  #6  
Old August 29th 06, 09:10 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,008
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?

Vortex wrote:
Hi,

We have a 10-ish year old Zanussi Freezer which we would like to
relocate outside (under shelter but open-air...and therefore
susceptible to low temperatures from time to time.).

The manual states: "If the room temperature falls below freezing
point the freezer will not function as it should".

Can anybody explain the above statement in more detail, please? I
really do not understand why a modern freezer shouldn't work when
outside.
Thanks,

David


We've got a 35 yar old Electrolux chest freezer, it spent it's first 10
years in the house, then 12 years in an outside (brick) shed, we moved house
and was going to bin it but decided at the last minute to 'run it into the
ground', IE keep it until it fell apart, it's been in this shed for the last
13 years and is still going strong, obviously the lid has had to be painted
with white gloss paint a few times, but I can't say it's ever 'not funtioned
properly', neither in the depths of winter nor in the recent heatwave (or
the one in '76!)


  #7  
Old August 29th 06, 09:20 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,212
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?


"Phil L" wrote in message
. uk...

We've got a 35 yar old Electrolux chest freezer, it spent it's first 10
years in the house, then 12 years in an outside (brick) shed, we moved
house and was going to bin it but decided at the last minute to 'run it
into the ground', IE keep it until it fell apart, it's been in this shed
for the last 13 years and is still going strong, obviously the lid has had
to be painted with white gloss paint a few times, but I can't say it's
ever 'not funtioned properly', neither in the depths of winter nor in the
recent heatwave (or the one in '76!)


Ah, they don't make 'em like they used to!

We run everything into the ground before we replace it. Including each
other!

Mary




  #8  
Old August 29th 06, 10:35 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,121
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?

The message
from "Vortex" contains these words:

Can anybody explain the above statement in more detail, please?


The thermostat is in the fridge compartment. If the exterior temperature
is so low that the fridge bit doesn't feel the need to come on the
freezer won't get cooled either.

This is because the freezer doesn't have its own thermostat.

Some fridge freezers do. Your doesn't.

--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  #9  
Old August 30th 06, 07:45 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 102
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?


wrote in message
oups.com...
I've seen this on a fridge with icebox. Basically the thermostat is
saying "it's cold enough" so the fridge compressor hardly ever starts.
That means that although the fridge portion may be cold enough (because
the thermostat says so), the freezer doessn't (because it relies on the
compressor running for the main fridge). A seperate freezer unit may be
fine though.

To be clear it's a pure chest freezer, with no fridge attached!

David


  #10  
Old August 30th 06, 07:52 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 102
Default Freezer operation at low ambient temperatures?


"Lobster" wrote in message
...
Vortex wrote:

We have a 10-ish year old Zanussi Freezer which we would like to relocate
outside (under shelter but open-air...and therefore susceptible to low
temperatures from time to time.).

The manual states: "If the room temperature falls below freezing point
the freezer will not function as it should".

Can anybody explain the above statement in more detail, please? I really
do not understand why a modern freezer shouldn't work when outside.


See mucho discussion of this in the archives of this ng:
http://tinyurl.com/o93at or
http://groups.google.co.uk/groups/search?hl=en&lr=&safe=off&num=10&q=freezer+garage+ temperature+group%3Auk.d-i-y&safe=off&qt_s=Search

IIRC the problem is primarily when you have a combined fridge freezer with
only one thermostat / compressor - ambient temp falls to below normal
fridge temp (~4 deg C), so the thermostat shuts the thing down regardless
of the fact that the freezer section still needs cooling.

We have separate 'overflow' fridge and freezer in our garage - I think
both have warnings against such 'abuse' - but both have work fine for
several years.

David


Yes I looked in the archives but nowhere could I find a succinct and
plausible explanation as to why freezer operation should become dodgy
specifically below 0C.

AFAIK the boiling point of ammonia (used in CFC free freezers is about -30C)
so I can imaging ambient temperatures in this order will cause problems.

Since it is/will be an "overflow" freezer we'll put it outside and see what
happens this winter.

David H


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Exterior of new Kenmore freezer is very hot MaryL Home Repair 12 July 22nd 13 03:20 PM
ice on the bottom of the freezer John Smith Home Repair 1 July 25th 06 03:26 AM
Freezer and ambient temperature Edgar Iredale UK diy 38 March 10th 05 09:27 PM
Hotpoint fridge freezer - freezer failure [email protected] UK diy 2 August 13th 03 07:06 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.