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running pex in a basement replumb job



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 2nd 12, 06:14 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 40
Default running pex in a basement replumb job

I bought an old house which needs to have the water supplies replumbed (It
has the old style butyl pipe, and I am
refinishing the basement)

I intend to run 3/4" Pex from the entrance (about half way down the 40 ft
length of the house)
in about 15 feet to where most of the fixtures are located,
then right angle turn and run about 16 feet drilling thru the 2x10 joists,
then right angle and run about 6 feet to the hot water tank.
Then run the 3/4 hot water pipe back parallel to the just run cold water.

Then I would tap off with 1/2 inch pex to the various fixtures between the
joists.

Question: I would have to cross 2 five inch furnace hot air pipes when I
drill thru the joists.
Will that be a problem with pex being near or touching the furnace
pipes ?

If so what is the best way to separate them

Thanks for any info

Ray


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  #2  
Old February 2nd 12, 07:30 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,230
Default running pex in a basement replumb job

On Feb 1, 10:14*pm, "Ray" wrote:
I bought an old house which needs to have the water supplies replumbed *(It
has the old style butyl pipe, and I am
refinishing the basement)

I intend to run 3/4" Pex from the entrance (about half way down the 40 ft
length of the house)
in about 15 feet to where most of the fixtures are located,
then right angle turn and run about 16 feet drilling thru the 2x10 joists,
*then * right angle *and run about 6 feet to the hot water tank.
Then run the 3/4 hot water pipe back parallel to the just run cold water.

Then I would tap off with 1/2 inch pex *to the various fixtures between the
joists.

Question: I would have to cross 2 five inch furnace hot air pipes when I
drill thru the joists.
* * * * * Will that be a problem with pex being near or touching the furnace
pipes ?

If so what is the best way to separate them

Thanks for any info

Ray


Ray-



Hot air produced by a forced air furnace is cooler than hot water so
the "hot air pipes" (hot air ducts), as you call them, won't be a
problem.
If you can touch something comfortably than PEX will be fine.

The furnace flue is an entirely different story.

One of the benefits of PEX is the material is much cheaper than
copper and much easier to run & make connections.
I would suggest doing some research on PEX installation, consider
doing a "home run" installation.
Unless you're going to finish the basement ceiling, there is no need
drill through the joists.
If you do drill, keep the hole out of the middle 1/3 of the span &
drill in the middle of the joist depth.
Also stay away from the extreme ends of the joists.

A "main & branch" system is certainly ok but a home run system has
lots of advantages.

check out
http://www.huduser.org/portal/public...sign_guide.pdf
it should answer all of your questions

also

http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/200...-05-11_PEX.PDF


cheers
Bob
  #3  
Old February 2nd 12, 04:16 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,751
Default running pex in a basement replumb job

On Wed, 1 Feb 2012 22:14:51 -0800, "Ray"
wrote:

I bought an old house which needs to have the water supplies replumbed (It
has the old style butyl pipe, and I am
refinishing the basement)

I intend to run 3/4" Pex from the entrance (about half way down the 40 ft
length of the house)
in about 15 feet to where most of the fixtures are located,
then right angle turn and run about 16 feet drilling thru the 2x10 joists,
then right angle and run about 6 feet to the hot water tank.
Then run the 3/4 hot water pipe back parallel to the just run cold water.

Then I would tap off with 1/2 inch pex to the various fixtures between the
joists.

Question: I would have to cross 2 five inch furnace hot air pipes when I
drill thru the joists.
Will that be a problem with pex being near or touching the furnace
pipes ?

If so what is the best way to separate them

Thanks for any info

Ray


"...Keep the Vanex PEX tubing a MINIMUM of 12 vertically and 6
horizontally from sources of high heat such as recessed light
fixtures, gas flue vents, heating appliances, or electric motors.
Forced air heating ducts are not generally considered sources of high
heat.."

Some additional guidelines he

http://www.abouthomes.info/files/0525%206518.pdf
  #4  
Old February 2nd 12, 09:01 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40
Default running pex in a basement replumb job




Hot air produced by a forced air furnace is cooler than hot water so
the "hot air pipes" (hot air ducts), as you call them, won't be a
problem.
If you can touch something comfortably than PEX will be fine.

The furnace flue is an entirely different story.

One of the benefits of PEX is the material is much cheaper than
copper and much easier to run & make connections.
I would suggest doing some research on PEX installation, consider
doing a "home run" installation.
Unless you're going to finish the basement ceiling, there is no need
drill through the joists.
If you do drill, keep the hole out of the middle 1/3 of the span &
drill in the middle of the joist depth.
Also stay away from the extreme ends of the joists.

A "main & branch" system is certainly ok but a home run system has
lots of advantages.

check out
http://www.huduser.org/portal/public...sign_guide.pdf
it should answer all of your questions

also

http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/200...-05-11_PEX.PDF


cheers
Bob


..
Thanks for the information, it is very helpful...
I considered a home run system, even bought some manifolds
from Home Depot, but couldnt find a logical and accessable place to locate
them.

I am going to finish the ceiling, so I would like to drill the joists,
but 2 retired plumbers at Home Depot advised agains running the Pex near
the heating ducts
so I thought I would check the concensus here.

Thanks
Ray


  #5  
Old February 2nd 12, 11:08 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,738
Default running pex in a basement replumb job

On 2/2/2012 12:14 AM, Ray wrote:
I bought an old house which needs to have the water supplies replumbed (It
has the old style butyl pipe, and I am
refinishing the basement)

I intend to run 3/4" Pex from the entrance (about half way down the 40 ft
length of the house)
in about 15 feet to where most of the fixtures are located,
then right angle turn and run about 16 feet drilling thru the 2x10 joists,
then right angle and run about 6 feet to the hot water tank.
Then run the 3/4 hot water pipe back parallel to the just run cold water.

Then I would tap off with 1/2 inch pex to the various fixtures between the
joists.

Question: I would have to cross 2 five inch furnace hot air pipes when I
drill thru the joists.
Will that be a problem with pex being near or touching the furnace
pipes ?

If so what is the best way to separate them

Thanks for any info

Ray



just nail them up to the underside of the joists with the one nail hangars.

--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  #6  
Old February 3rd 12, 07:49 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,230
Default running pex in a basement replumb job

On Feb 2, 1:01*pm, "Ray" wrote:
Hot air produced by a forced air furnace is cooler than hot water so
the "hot air pipes" (hot air ducts), as you call them, won't be a
problem.
If you can touch something comfortably than PEX will be fine.

The furnace flue is an entirely different story.

One of the benefits of PEX is the material is much cheaper *than
copper and *much easier to run & make connections.
I would suggest doing some research on PEX installation, consider
doing a "home run" installation.
Unless you're going to finish the basement ceiling, there is no need
drill through the joists.
If you do drill, keep the hole out of the middle 1/3 of the span &
drill in the middle of the joist depth.
Also stay away from the extreme ends of the joists.

A "main & branch" system is certainly ok but a home run system has
lots of advantages.

check outhttp://www.huduser.org/portal/publications/pex_design_guide.pdf
it should answer all of your questions

also

http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/200...aking/document...

cheers
Bob

.
Thanks for the information, it is very helpful...
*I considered a home run system, even bought some manifolds
from Home Depot, but couldnt find a logical and accessable place to locate
them.

I am going to finish the ceiling, so I would like to drill the joists,
*but 2 retired plumbers at Home Depot advised agains running the Pex near
the heating ducts
so I thought I would check the concensus here.

Thanks
Ray


Good point.... not having a suitable place for the manifolds does pose
a problem.
My house has a small utility basement for he furnace & water heater.

New homes that use PEX have a place desing & built for the manifolds,
re-pipes are a different story.

In places where the PEX might chafe / be subject to abrasion, I run it
thru a short length of flexible (non metallic) water tight conduit.

cheers
Bob
  #7  
Old February 4th 12, 01:06 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,419
Default running pex in a basement replumb job

On Feb 2, 2:30*am, DD_BobK wrote:
On Feb 1, 10:14*pm, "Ray" wrote:





I bought an old house which needs to have the water supplies replumbed *(It
has the old style butyl pipe, and I am
refinishing the basement)


I intend to run 3/4" Pex from the entrance (about half way down the 40 ft
length of the house)
in about 15 feet to where most of the fixtures are located,
then right angle turn and run about 16 feet drilling thru the 2x10 joists,
*then * right angle *and run about 6 feet to the hot water tank.
Then run the 3/4 hot water pipe back parallel to the just run cold water.

  #8  
Old February 4th 12, 03:06 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,230
Default running pex in a basement replumb job

On Feb 3, 5:06*pm, JIMMIE wrote:
On Feb 2, 2:30*am, DD_BobK wrote:









On Feb 1, 10:14*pm, "Ray" wrote:


I bought an old house which needs to have the water supplies replumbed *(It
has the old style butyl pipe, and I am
refinishing the basement)


I intend to run 3/4" Pex from the entrance (about half way down the 40 ft
length of the house)
in about 15 feet to where most of the fixtures are located,
then right angle turn and run about 16 feet drilling thru the 2x10 joists,
*then * right angle *and run about 6 feet to the hot water tank..
Then run the 3/4 hot water pipe back parallel to the just run cold water.


Then I would tap off with 1/2 inch pex *to the various fixtures between the
joists.


Question: I would have to cross 2 five inch furnace hot air pipes when I
drill thru the joists.
* * * * * Will that be a problem with pex being near or touching the furnace
pipes ?


If so what is the best way to separate them


Thanks for any info


Ray


Ray-


Hot air produced by a forced air furnace is cooler than hot water so
the "hot air pipes" (hot air ducts), as you call them, won't be a
problem.
If you can touch something comfortably than PEX will be fine.


The furnace flue is an entirely different story.


One of the benefits of PEX is the material is much cheaper *than
copper and *much easier to run & make connections.
I would suggest doing some research on PEX installation, consider
doing a "home run" installation.
Unless you're going to finish the basement ceiling, there is no need
drill through the joists.
If you do drill, keep the hole out of the middle 1/3 of the span &
drill in the middle of the joist depth.
Also stay away from the extreme ends of the joists.


A "main & branch" system is certainly ok but a home run system has
lots of advantages.


check outhttp://www.huduser.org/portal/publications/pex_design_guide.pdf
it should answer all of your questions


also


http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/200...aking/document...


cheers
Bob- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


One of the diadvantages of a home run system is that you can get a lot
of pipe crowding in one place where you locate the manifold. No reason
you cant have two or more manifolds though. That is probably the way I
will do my wifes house. A manifold for the kitchen and laundry and
another for the 3 baths.
That way I will only have two pipes running the full length of the
house.

Jimmie


Good points.....

the only two home run systems I did involved only two baths, a kitchen
& a laundry room.
Plus the houses were fairly compact.

Larger homes or spread out layouts (ranchers) can definitely benefit
from remote manifolds, which are "mini" home runs.

I previously owned a rancher that was going to be exactly as you
suggest; kitchen / laundry manifold and bathrooms' manifold but I sold
it before it got re-piped.

cheers
Bob
 




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