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John
 
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Default Bonakemi Traffic, hard to use?

Hi everyone.

Anyone use this stuff? Apply it themselves?

I'm about to put down about 700 fet of red pine flooring. I'm considering
trying this stuff for it' durability and low voc's. I've done a fair bit of
flooring in my past (in houses I've lived in) and I'm experienced with both
water based and oil polyurethanes however the application "Traffic" seems a
little more difficult.
http://www.bonakemi.com/productspecs/pdf/traffic.pdf

Anone with experience care to comment? Tips? Suggestions?

Thanks,

Jeff


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Jeff:

I am flooring pro for 21 years and have used "Traffic" for around 6
First you need to seal the floor. Don't use the Bona waterbase sealer.
All the floor pros now use Sealcoat universal sealer ie: dewaxed shellac
Apply the Sealcoat with a lambs wool pad or 5" paint brush; put it on kind of
thin.
Sealcoat is a sealer, no build here.
Wear a respirator, alcohol based.
Scuff the Sealcoat with a maroon pad (320 grit) with a floor buffer.
The Sealcoat will bugger up the pad, so clean it often.
Some say not to buff the Sealcoat that the next coat of poly will buff out flat.
But, Traffic is so darn hard; it is not easy to get smooth.
After you buff out the Sealcoat, vacuum the floor and tack with a dampened rag.
Cleaning between coats is the most important step.
Next, mix the poly; you might need 1&1/2 gallons for each coat.
Cut in the edges with an 8" felt paint pad, the main floor has to be applied
with a "T" bar and white "rolled" felt pad.
Best to have two people to apply the finish.
Put it on kind of thin, because you will not be able to remove any puddles
after they dry.
Then buff the floor with a strip of self sticking 150 grit paper under a new
maroon pad, go kind of slow.
You will see a light white powder, but not much cause this stuff is hard.
Again clean the floor as above and coat again.
Two coats should be OK

You can purchase the tools on the net.
Good luck



"John" wrote:
Hi everyone.

Anyone use this stuff? Apply it themselves?

I'm about to put down about 700 fet of red pine flooring. I'm considering
trying this stuff for it' durability and low voc's. I've done a fair bit of
flooring in my past (in houses I've lived in) and I'm experienced with both
water based and oil polyurethanes however the application "Traffic" seems a
little more difficult.
http://www.bonakemi.com/productspecs/pdf/traffic.pdf

Anone with experience care to comment? Tips? Suggestions?

Thanks,

Jeff



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John
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
...
Jeff:

I am flooring pro for 21 years and have used "Traffic" for around 6
First you need to seal the floor. Don't use the Bona waterbase sealer.
All the floor pros now use Sealcoat universal sealer ie: dewaxed shellac
Apply the Sealcoat with a lambs wool pad or 5" paint brush; put it on kind

of
thin.
Sealcoat is a sealer, no build here.
Wear a respirator, alcohol based.
Scuff the Sealcoat with a maroon pad (320 grit) with a floor buffer.
The Sealcoat will bugger up the pad, so clean it often.
Some say not to buff the Sealcoat that the next coat of poly will buff out

flat.
But, Traffic is so darn hard; it is not easy to get smooth.
After you buff out the Sealcoat, vacuum the floor and tack with a dampened

rag.
Cleaning between coats is the most important step.


I'm going to stain. Stain after the Sealcoat is buffed?

Next, mix the poly; you might need 1&1/2 gallons for each coat.
Cut in the edges with an 8" felt paint pad, the main floor has to be

applied
with a "T" bar and white "rolled" felt pad.
Best to have two people to apply the finish.
Put it on kind of thin, because you will not be able to remove any puddles
after they dry.
Then buff the floor with a strip of self sticking 150 grit paper under a

new
maroon pad, go kind of slow.
You will see a light white powder, but not much cause this stuff is hard.
Again clean the floor as above and coat again.
Two coats should be OK

You can purchase the tools on the net.
Good luck


Thanks. Would you think that "Traffic" would be suitible for red pine wide
boards? 6" to 12" wide?

-Jeff







"John" wrote:
Hi everyone.

Anyone use this stuff? Apply it themselves?

I'm about to put down about 700 fet of red pine flooring. I'm considering
trying this stuff for it' durability and low voc's. I've done a fair bit

of
flooring in my past (in houses I've lived in) and I'm experienced with

both
water based and oil polyurethanes however the application "Traffic" seems

a
little more difficult.
http://www.bonakemi.com/productspecs/pdf/traffic.pdf

Anone with experience care to comment? Tips? Suggestions?

Thanks,

Jeff





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Thanks. Would you think that "Traffic" would be suitible for red pine wide
boards? 6" to 12" wide?



Traffic would be fine for this.
It is hard, but will not get brittle like oil based poly.
I have it in a Bedroom in my house, 200 Year old wide plank white pine 7" to
15", Satin finish, and I like the look
It also comes in semi-gloss

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John
 
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wrote in message
...


Thanks. Would you think that "Traffic" would be suitible for red pine

wide
boards? 6" to 12" wide?



Traffic would be fine for this.
It is hard, but will not get brittle like oil based poly.
I have it in a Bedroom in my house, 200 Year old wide plank white pine 7"

to
15", Satin finish, and I like the look
It also comes in semi-gloss


One more question if you'd be kind enough to answer.

I just talked to the guys at BonaKemi and they suggested I do not stain
pine, due to uneven stain absorbsion. I really want the old-amber look of
pine since this floor is going into a 200 year old house and water based
finishes won't get me there. Have you had any success with stain on pine
before you poly? Bona makes their "Mega" finish, but they told me that
won't yellow as much as an oil poly.

Any suggestions on getting he look of an older pine floor with the
durability of water based finish like "Traffic"?

Thanks again for taking the time to share your expertise.

-Jeff




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Patriarch
 
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Default

"John" wrote in
:


wrote in message
...


Thanks. Would you think that "Traffic" would be suitible for red
pine

wide
boards? 6" to 12" wide?



Traffic would be fine for this.
It is hard, but will not get brittle like oil based poly.
I have it in a Bedroom in my house, 200 Year old wide plank white
pine 7"

to
15", Satin finish, and I like the look
It also comes in semi-gloss


One more question if you'd be kind enough to answer.

I just talked to the guys at BonaKemi and they suggested I do not
stain pine, due to uneven stain absorbsion. I really want the
old-amber look of pine since this floor is going into a 200 year old
house and water based finishes won't get me there. Have you had any
success with stain on pine before you poly? Bona makes their "Mega"
finish, but they told me that won't yellow as much as an oil poly.

Any suggestions on getting he look of an older pine floor with the
durability of water based finish like "Traffic"?

Thanks again for taking the time to share your expertise.

-Jeff


I'm not the floor pro who has been helping you, but I have a thought.

He suggested a shellac sealing coat between the raw floor and the
Bonkemi. Tinting shellac with something like Transtint is pretty
trivial, and can give you that hint of ambering that you seek. Just
plan to do the whole batch at once, and mix it well. You could either
use the Zinsser premixed, or something from Hock Finishes or Homestead,
in a dewaxed bulk flake. If using the flake, you could use the natural
colors of shellac as well. That 'pumpkin pine' color is pretty close to
what you'd likely get with a garnet shellac, and may be historically
accurate. Test in the closet.

www.homesteadfinishing.com
www.hockfinishes.com

Both companies are good folks with whom to deal.

Patriarch
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Jeff:

First off, after sanding your floor, a test spot. Take a wet wash cloth to it.
this is the color that you will get after the Traffic.
I know my own 200 yr old floor is a deep red color just with Traffic.
Something to do with the age of the floor.
Then, take some Sealcoat and apply it to another small area to see what it
looks like.
As in the earlier post, you can tint the seal coat.
But with tinting, the color is not as colorfast as with pigmented stains.
(Direct sunlight)
And pine will get blotchy when stained, But you can also use a prestain.
I have other processes, but to keep it simple, try the two methods above first
to see if you like it.

And if you stain, you have to sand the floor to perfection, the soft pine will
show scratches from the edger and floor sander. Most flooring contractors will
not stain pine. It takes more time then they are willing to spend on a job.
TIM


Patriarch wrote:
"John" wrote in
:


wrote in message
...


Thanks. Would you think that "Traffic" would be suitible for red
pine

wide
boards? 6" to 12" wide?


Traffic would be fine for this.
It is hard, but will not get brittle like oil based poly.
I have it in a Bedroom in my house, 200 Year old wide plank white
pine 7"

to
15", Satin finish, and I like the look
It also comes in semi-gloss


One more question if you'd be kind enough to answer.

I just talked to the guys at BonaKemi and they suggested I do not
stain pine, due to uneven stain absorbsion. I really want the
old-amber look of pine since this floor is going into a 200 year old
house and water based finishes won't get me there. Have you had any
success with stain on pine before you poly? Bona makes their "Mega"
finish, but they told me that won't yellow as much as an oil poly.

Any suggestions on getting he look of an older pine floor with the
durability of water based finish like "Traffic"?

Thanks again for taking the time to share your expertise.

-Jeff


I'm not the floor pro who has been helping you, but I have a thought.

He suggested a shellac sealing coat between the raw floor and the
Bonkemi. Tinting shellac with something like Transtint is pretty
trivial, and can give you that hint of ambering that you seek. Just
plan to do the whole batch at once, and mix it well. You could either
use the Zinsser premixed, or something from Hock Finishes or Homestead,
in a dewaxed bulk flake. If using the flake, you could use the natural
colors of shellac as well. That 'pumpkin pine' color is pretty close to
what you'd likely get with a garnet shellac, and may be historically
accurate. Test in the closet.

www.homesteadfinishing.com
www.hockfinishes.com

Both companies are good folks with whom to deal.

Patriarch


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B a r r y
 
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Default

John wrote:
wrote in message



Any suggestions on getting he look of an older pine floor with the
durability of water based finish like "Traffic"?

Thanks again for taking the time to share your expertise.



Tint the Sealcoat.

Barry
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