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Default Save time cutting plywood

A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk
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Ed Pawlowski wrote in :

A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


There were adapters at one time to use a circular saw as a table saw. That
bloke is just going the opposite way!

Puckdropper
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On Thursday, May 20, 2021 at 4:13:23 AM UTC-4, Puckdropper wrote:
Ed Pawlowski wrote in :
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk

There were adapters at one time to use a circular saw as a table saw. That
bloke is just going the opposite way!

Puckdropper


Saw Table! I had one of those 30ish years ago. I still have the table out in the
shed, but without a saw attached. I use it as a portable worksurface every
now and then.
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On Thursday, May 20, 2021 at 12:15:16 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


My favorite part of Imgur is the comments. Click the "Expand All"
link because the follow-up comments are often better than the
original comment.

e.g.

Comment: That's what a sled is for...
Follow-up: OK, but then you have to spend money keeping your reindeer fed

Comment: Australian table saw?
Follow-up: ˙ʇunɔ qɯnp uʞɔnɟ sᴉɥʇ ɥʇᴉʍ uᴉ sn dɯnl ʇ,uop

Not sure if that will work in all newsreaders. It's an upside down sentence..
"Don't lump us in with this f-ing c..."
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On 5/19/2021 11:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk



Something tells me that would not be faster adter having to lift the TS
up there upside down.


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Default Save time cutting plywood

On 5/20/2021 10:47 AM, Leon wrote:
On 5/19/2021 11:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk



Something tells me that would not be faster adter having to lift the TS
up there upside down.

That is like using your push mower to trim your hedges.

However it appears to be working for him.
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On Thu, 20 May 2021 00:15:11 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


What a good idea! I'll have to try that with my Unisaw.
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On Thu, 20 May 2021 12:50:06 -0400, knuttle
wrote:

On 5/20/2021 10:47 AM, Leon wrote:
On 5/19/2021 11:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk



Something tells me that would not be faster adter having to lift the TS
up there upside down.

That is like using your push mower to trim your hedges.

However it appears to be working for him.


If he gets a kickback, it's going to be a Bugs Bunny show.
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Default Save time cutting plywood

On Thursday, May 20, 2021 at 3:56:12 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Thu, 20 May 2021 12:50:06 -0400, knuttle
wrote:

On 5/20/2021 10:47 AM, Leon wrote:
On 5/19/2021 11:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


Something tells me that would not be faster adter having to lift the TS
up there upside down.

That is like using your push mower to trim your hedges.

However it appears to be working for him.

If he gets a kickback, it's going to be a Bugs Bunny show.

another future Darwin Award candidate...
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Default Save time cutting plywood

On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut. 5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw. It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.


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On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 1:11:44 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk
Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut. 5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw. It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.


But where is his circular saw? Maybe he left it home, maybe it's locked in somebody's truck,
maybe it's on the roof and all the ladders went home. Maybe he let the smoke out or cut
the cord.

Your math may be correct, but are you sure that you've accounted for all of the variables?

Oh yeah, one other question: Aren't you making a pretty bold assumption about the number
of cuts he plans on making? Maybe he's had his fun and he's done.
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On 6/3/2021 12:11 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk

Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut.


Well that is nor right, for the vast majority of 10" table saws. 3" and
a bit over is the max I have ever seen. MY ICS SawStop cuts 3.125" deep.

So recalculate everything below. :!) 4 sheets max.






5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth
of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets
with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw.
It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra
effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet
tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down
table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its
easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet
the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be
more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from
a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.


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Default Save time cutting plywood

Another variable for the mix:

It is likely that the table saw has more torque than the circular saw and
can actually make the deep cut relatively quickly. The circular saw may
require a much slower feed rate to accomplish the cut.

" wrote in message
...

On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of
cut. 5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth
of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets with
the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw. It is an
improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra effort? Looks
like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet tall. About 50
sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down table saw compared to
17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its easier to push a circular saw
than an upside down table saw. So I bet the effort and time used for 10
upside down table saw passes will be more than the 17 circular saw passes.
So in the end its a negative from a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new
and better way to cut plywood.


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Default Save time cutting plywood

On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 06:08:26 -0700 (PDT), Brian Welch
wrote:

On Thursday, May 20, 2021 at 3:56:12 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Thu, 20 May 2021 12:50:06 -0400, knuttle
wrote:

On 5/20/2021 10:47 AM, Leon wrote:
On 5/19/2021 11:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


Something tells me that would not be faster adter having to lift the TS
up there upside down.
That is like using your push mower to trim your hedges.

However it appears to be working for him.

If he gets a kickback, it's going to be a Bugs Bunny show.

another future Darwin Award candidate...


Does that saw have enough gumption to kick itself?
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On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 10:11:41 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut. 5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw. It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from a labor, production, perspective.


One thing that he has though is a vastly better fence than comes on
any circular saw, and no need to rig and align a track for each cut.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.



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Default Save time cutting plywood

On Thu, 3 Jun 2021 10:11:41 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut. 5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw. It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.


But he did get more clicks than a circular saw and he wouldn't have
been up for the Darwin Award.
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" writes:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one=20
sheet to cut=20
=20
https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth o=
f cut. 5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" de=
pth of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets =
with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw. It i=
s an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra effort? =
Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet tall. About=
50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down table saw compare=
d to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its easier to push a circul=
ar saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet the effort and time used fo=
r 10 upside down table saw passes will be more than the 17 circular saw pas=
ses. So in the end its a negative from a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new=
and better way to cut plywood.


You mean like a panel saw?

https://www.woodcraft.com/categories/panel-saws
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On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 1:48:47 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/3/2021 12:11 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk


Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut.

Well that is nor right, for the vast majority of 10" table saws. 3" and
a bit over is the max I have ever seen. MY ICS SawStop cuts 3.125" deep.

So recalculate everything below. :!) 4 sheets max.


Went to the basement and measured my Delta Contractor saw. It has about a 3" depth of cut. I rarely if ever try to cut maximum depth so never even measured it until your comment. I guessed wrong on the depth of cut. 4 sheets max per cut. But I probably over estimated on the 7.25" circular saw too. It likely only cuts 2 sheets of plywood instead of 3. So some of my calculations may have been right after all. Ha! Better to be lucky than good or smart. Kind of like the guy in the video.





5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth
of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets
with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw.
It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra
effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet
tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down
table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its
easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet
the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be
more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from
a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.

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On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 12:37:05 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 1:11:44 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk

Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut. 5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw. It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.

But where is his circular saw? Maybe he left it home, maybe it's locked in somebody's truck,
maybe it's on the roof and all the ladders went home. Maybe he let the smoke out or cut
the cord.


True. But your argument might be comparable to some other examples I thought of. Fixing the soffit on your house. But you have no ladder to get up there. The smarter, simpler, more logical person might figure out where to get a ladder. Buy it, rent it, borrow it. But the more creative might fix a hook to the end of a rope and throw it up to grab on the gutter. And climb up there to fix the soffit. Or he might recruit a friend who does not have a ladder to loan. Both climb up on the roof from the top of a pickup they park on the other side of the house and one guy hangs over the edge of the roof upside down and repairs the soffit. While the other guy holds onto his ankles. Or if he knows a painter maybe he could get hold of 50 paint cans and assemble a staircase of paint cans high enough to get him up to the soffit. All possibilities for the creative genius who can't get a ladder. Kind of like turning the table saw upside down instead of finding a circular saw.





Your math may be correct, but are you sure that you've accounted for all of the variables?

Oh yeah, one other question: Aren't you making a pretty bold assumption about the number
of cuts he plans on making? Maybe he's had his fun and he's done.


True again. But doing this upside down table saw once is maybe comparable to playing Russian roulette. Some people, maybe, get a thrill out of playing it once. Just once since even the dimmest know the odds are stacked against them if they play it too often. But I'm confident almost everyone will say even playing Russian roulette once is not smart. Like doing the upside down table saw cutting once is not smart.
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On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 08:44:32 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 12:37:05 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 1:11:44 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk
Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut. 5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw. It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.

But where is his circular saw? Maybe he left it home, maybe it's locked in somebody's truck,
maybe it's on the roof and all the ladders went home. Maybe he let the smoke out or cut
the cord.


True. But your argument might be comparable to some other examples I thought of. Fixing the soffit on your house. But you have no ladder to get up there. The smarter, simpler, more logical person might figure out where to get a ladder. Buy it, rent it, borrow it. But the more creative might fix a hook to the end of a rope and throw it up to grab on the gutter. And climb up there to fix the soffit. Or he might recruit a friend who does not have a ladder to loan. Both climb up on the roof from the top of a pickup they park on the other side of the house and one guy hangs over the edge of the roof upside down and repairs the soffit. While the other guy holds onto his ankles. Or if he knows a painter maybe he could get hold of 50 paint cans and assemble a staircase of paint cans high enough to get him up to the soffit. All possibilities for the creative genius who can't get a ladder. Kind of like turning the table saw upside down instead of finding a circular saw.

I guess there are suicidal people everywhere.



Your math may be correct, but are you sure that you've accounted for all of the variables?

Oh yeah, one other question: Aren't you making a pretty bold assumption about the number
of cuts he plans on making? Maybe he's had his fun and he's done.


True again. But doing this upside down table saw once is maybe comparable to playing Russian roulette. Some people, maybe, get a thrill out of playing it once. Just once since even the dimmest know the odds are stacked against them if they play it too often. But I'm confident almost everyone will say even playing Russian roulette once is not smart. Like doing the upside down table saw cutting once is not smart.


The Darwin Award isn't something to aspire to winning.


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On 6/4/2021 10:28 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 1:48:47 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/3/2021 12:11 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk

Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut.

Well that is nor right, for the vast majority of 10" table saws. 3" and
a bit over is the max I have ever seen. MY ICS SawStop cuts 3.125" deep.

So recalculate everything below. :!) 4 sheets max.


Went to the basement and measured my Delta Contractor saw. It has about a 3" depth of cut. I rarely if ever try to cut maximum depth so never even measured it until your comment. I guessed wrong on the depth of cut. 4 sheets max per cut. But I probably over estimated on the 7.25" circular saw too. It likely only cuts 2 sheets of plywood instead of 3. So some of my calculations may have been right after all. Ha! Better to be lucky than good or smart. Kind of like the guy in the video.




LOL, I think your circular saw estimate may have been correct. I fave
a Festool 75 track saw with an, IIRC, 8" blade that cuts to 75mm, and or
about 3". You should be able to cut 3, 3/4" sheets at once with a 7.25"
blade IF it has the power.




5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth
of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets
with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw.
It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra
effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet
tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down
table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its
easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet
the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be
more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from
a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.


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On 6/4/2021 10:28 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 1:48:47 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/3/2021 12:11 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk

Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut.

Well that is nor right, for the vast majority of 10" table saws. 3" and
a bit over is the max I have ever seen. MY ICS SawStop cuts 3.125" deep.

So recalculate everything below. :!) 4 sheets max.


Went to the basement and measured my Delta Contractor saw. It has about a 3" depth of cut. I rarely if ever try to cut maximum depth so never even measured it until your comment. I guessed wrong on the depth of cut. 4 sheets max per cut. But I probably over estimated on the 7.25" circular saw too. It likely only cuts 2 sheets of plywood instead of 3. So some of my calculations may have been right after all. Ha! Better to be lucky than good or smart. Kind of like the guy in the video.





5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth
of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets
with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw.
It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra
effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet
tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down
table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its
easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet
the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be
more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from
a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.


It's likely max thought cuts are 4 and 3 and sheets, respectively, but
that presumes as Leon notes, one has a circular saw with sufficient
power to actually do a full three-sheet cut.

If that's the case, it's a 25% decrease in number of passes which again
presuming the case of 50 sheet pile (and the whole pile needs cutting)
would be about 13 versus 17 passes.

Hardly seems worth the effort, but he's a strapping fella' so handling
the saw doesn't seem that much of a problem; one can move the cut sheets
out from under it between passes so don't have to set it back down on
the ground every time.

Compared to trying to reach the middle of the top of the stack with a
handsaw for those first few cuts, doesn't seem too bad a deal to me --
it's big and heavy enough kickback is a pretty minimal risk and while I
don't think I'd have ever thunk of trying it (but I'm surely not stout
enough to get the saw up there in the first place now and not sure ever
was) but I don't see it as particularly dangerous.

Unusual, yes.

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Default Save time cutting plywood

On Sat, 5 Jun 2021 13:36:00 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 6/4/2021 10:28 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 1:48:47 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/3/2021 12:11 PM, wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 11:15:16 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
A little trick that will save lots of time when you have more than one
sheet to cut

https://imgur.com/gallery/9Bz6KYk

Guessing that is a 10" table saw he is using. So it has about a 4" depth of cut.
Well that is nor right, for the vast majority of 10" table saws. 3" and
a bit over is the max I have ever seen. MY ICS SawStop cuts 3.125" deep.

So recalculate everything below. :!) 4 sheets max.


Went to the basement and measured my Delta Contractor saw. It has about a 3" depth of cut. I rarely if ever try to cut maximum depth so never even measured it until your comment. I guessed wrong on the depth of cut. 4 sheets max per cut. But I probably over estimated on the 7.25" circular saw too. It likely only cuts 2 sheets of plywood instead of 3. So some of my calculations may have been right after all. Ha! Better to be lucky than good or smart. Kind of like the guy in the video.





5 sheets of 3/4" plywood. A 7.25" circular saw has about a 2.5" depth
of cut. 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood. So he is able to cut 2 more sheets
with the upside down table saw than if he used a common circular saw.
It is an improvement in productivity. But enough to warrant the extra
effort? Looks like the stack of plywood he is cutting is about 3 feet
tall. About 50 sheets. So it will be 10 passes with his upside down
table saw compared to 17 passes with a circular saw. Worth it? Its
easier to push a circular saw than an upside down table saw. So I bet
the effort and time used for 10 upside down table saw passes will be
more than the 17 circular saw passes. So in the end its a negative from
a labor, production, perspective.

This chap needs to use his obvious and vastly superior mind to invent a new and better way to cut plywood.


It's likely max thought cuts are 4 and 3 and sheets, respectively, but
that presumes as Leon notes, one has a circular saw with sufficient
power to actually do a full three-sheet cut.

If that's the case, it's a 25% decrease in number of passes which again
presuming the case of 50 sheet pile (and the whole pile needs cutting)
would be about 13 versus 17 passes.

Hardly seems worth the effort, but he's a strapping fella' so handling
the saw doesn't seem that much of a problem; one can move the cut sheets
out from under it between passes so don't have to set it back down on
the ground every time.

Compared to trying to reach the middle of the top of the stack with a
handsaw for those first few cuts, doesn't seem too bad a deal to me --
it's big and heavy enough kickback is a pretty minimal risk and while I
don't think I'd have ever thunk of trying it (but I'm surely not stout
enough to get the saw up there in the first place now and not sure ever
was) but I don't see it as particularly dangerous.


I certainly would want it to run off the end and fall on me, still
running.

Unusual, yes.


I don't see it as being much different than any other clickbait.
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