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Default Current lumber prices explained

This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in one
place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St. Journal and
other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s

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Default Current lumber prices explained

On 4/21/2021 9:46 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in
one place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St.
Journal and other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s



Sooo what we are seeing is that workers are not working. Employers are
having to pay top dollar to get the workers off of the governments tit.
There IS a labor shortage.

Secondly, demand for new housing is probably at an all time high. I
have heard several builders say that they cannot get bricks, along with
everything else.

More people are working at home now days and need a suitable home, with
preferably a dedicated office. Many current homes do not have dedicated
office space.

When supply is limited and demand is up prices go up.
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Default Current lumber prices explained

On Wed, 21 Apr 2021 10:48:43 -0500, Leon [email protected]
wrote:

On 4/21/2021 9:46 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in
one place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St.
Journal and other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s



Sooo what we are seeing is that workers are not working. Employers are
having to pay top dollar to get the workers off of the governments tit.
There IS a labor shortage.

Secondly, demand for new housing is probably at an all time high. I
have heard several builders say that they cannot get bricks, along with
everything else.

More people are working at home now days and need a suitable home, with
preferably a dedicated office. Many current homes do not have dedicated
office space.

When supply is limited and demand is up prices go up.


That's the bottom line. He's saying that the bottleneck is the
sawmills and everything else is plentiful. The bottleneck can ask for
the big bucks. Kinda obvious. If the bottleneck were the timber
growers, they'd be getting the big bucks.
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Default Current lumber prices explained

On Wed, 21 Apr 2021 12:28:03 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 21 Apr 2021 10:48:43 -0500, Leon [email protected]
wrote:

On 4/21/2021 9:46 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in
one place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St.
Journal and other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s


Sooo what we are seeing is that workers are not working. Employers are
having to pay top dollar to get the workers off of the governments tit.
There IS a labor shortage.

Secondly, demand for new housing is probably at an all time high. I
have heard several builders say that they cannot get bricks, along with
everything else.

More people are working at home now days and need a suitable home, with
preferably a dedicated office. Many current homes do not have dedicated
office space.

When supply is limited and demand is up prices go up.


That's the bottom line. He's saying that the bottleneck is the
sawmills and everything else is plentiful. The bottleneck can ask for
the big bucks. Kinda obvious. If the bottleneck were the timber
growers, they'd be getting the big bucks.


The implication above is that the "problem" isn't supply, rather
demand. That's the best "problem" to have, if you're going to have
one.
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Default Current lumber prices explained

On 4/21/2021 11:48 AM, Leon wrote:
On 4/21/2021 9:46 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in
one place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St.
Journal and other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s



Sooo what we are seeing is that workers are not working. Employers are
having to pay top dollar to get the workers off of the governments tit.
There IS a labor shortage.

Secondly, demand for new housing is probably at an all time high. I have
heard several builders say that they cannot get bricks, along with
everything else.

More people are working at home now days and need a suitable home, with
preferably a dedicated office. Many current homes do not have dedicated
office space.

When supply is limited and demand is up prices go up.


That's been quite a theme lately. Fast food restaraunts especially
can't get workers... people would rather have unemployment and make
more. Arbys is giving out free sandwiches and milkshakes to anyone that
comes to open interviews in early May (can't remember the day).


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Default Current lumber prices explained

On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 12:35:44 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 4/21/2021 11:48 AM, Leon wrote:
On 4/21/2021 9:46 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in
one place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St.
Journal and other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s



Sooo what we are seeing is that workers are not working. Employers are
having to pay top dollar to get the workers off of the governments tit.
There IS a labor shortage.

Secondly, demand for new housing is probably at an all time high. I have
heard several builders say that they cannot get bricks, along with
everything else.

More people are working at home now days and need a suitable home, with
preferably a dedicated office. Many current homes do not have dedicated
office space.

When supply is limited and demand is up prices go up.


That's been quite a theme lately. Fast food restaraunts especially
can't get workers... people would rather have unemployment and make
more. Arbys is giving out free sandwiches and milkshakes to anyone that
comes to open interviews in early May (can't remember the day).


And some spouses have something wrong with him. I remember a court
reporter who in the '90s was pulling down over 200K a year working on
a tiny little table in the basement of this huge house because that's
the only space that her unemployed husband would allow her. I was
tempted to tell her "dump the jerk and marry me and I'll build you an
office".
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Default Current lumber prices explained

On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 15:09:47 -0400, J. Clarke
wrote:

On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 12:35:44 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 4/21/2021 11:48 AM, Leon wrote:
On 4/21/2021 9:46 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in
one place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St.
Journal and other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s


Sooo what we are seeing is that workers are not working. Employers are
having to pay top dollar to get the workers off of the governments tit.
There IS a labor shortage.

Secondly, demand for new housing is probably at an all time high. I have
heard several builders say that they cannot get bricks, along with
everything else.

More people are working at home now days and need a suitable home, with
preferably a dedicated office. Many current homes do not have dedicated
office space.

When supply is limited and demand is up prices go up.


That's been quite a theme lately. Fast food restaraunts especially
can't get workers... people would rather have unemployment and make
more. Arbys is giving out free sandwiches and milkshakes to anyone that
comes to open interviews in early May (can't remember the day).


And some spouses have something wrong with him. I remember a court
reporter who in the '90s was pulling down over 200K a year working on
a tiny little table in the basement of this huge house because that's
the only space that her unemployed husband would allow her. I was
tempted to tell her "dump the jerk and marry me and I'll build you an
office".


I guess I'm safe. We have two "offices" (bedrooms) and my wife has
been retired for almost ten years. I get the room over the garage. It
has a closet so is considered a bedroom. WiFi works, so all is good.
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Default Current lumber prices explained

On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 12:35:44 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 4/21/2021 11:48 AM, Leon wrote:
On 4/21/2021 9:46 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in
one place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St.
Journal and other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s



Sooo what we are seeing is that workers are not working. Employers are
having to pay top dollar to get the workers off of the governments tit.
There IS a labor shortage.

Secondly, demand for new housing is probably at an all time high. I have
heard several builders say that they cannot get bricks, along with
everything else.

More people are working at home now days and need a suitable home, with
preferably a dedicated office. Many current homes do not have dedicated
office space.

When supply is limited and demand is up prices go up.


That's been quite a theme lately. Fast food restaraunts especially
can't get workers... people would rather have unemployment and make
more. Arbys is giving out free sandwiches and milkshakes to anyone that
comes to open interviews in early May (can't remember the day).

The problem with lumber goes WAY beyonf supply and demand. Lumber is
a "commofity" and is traded on the futures markets - and the
speculators / traders are making a KILLING.
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Default Current lumber prices explained

On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 22:07:29 -0400, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 12:35:44 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 4/21/2021 11:48 AM, Leon wrote:
On 4/21/2021 9:46 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in
one place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St.
Journal and other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s


Sooo what we are seeing is that workers are not working. Employers are
having to pay top dollar to get the workers off of the governments tit.
There IS a labor shortage.

Secondly, demand for new housing is probably at an all time high. I have
heard several builders say that they cannot get bricks, along with
everything else.

More people are working at home now days and need a suitable home, with
preferably a dedicated office. Many current homes do not have dedicated
office space.

When supply is limited and demand is up prices go up.


That's been quite a theme lately. Fast food restaraunts especially
can't get workers... people would rather have unemployment and make
more. Arbys is giving out free sandwiches and milkshakes to anyone that
comes to open interviews in early May (can't remember the day).

The problem with lumber goes WAY beyonf supply and demand. Lumber is
a "commofity" and is traded on the futures markets - and the
speculators / traders are making a KILLING.


Without supply or demand (or more precisely, the fighting between the
two) traders have nothing to trade. It's all about a "scarce"
commodity and a "plentiful" demand. The fact that traders get in the
middle oils the machinery.
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Default Current lumber prices explained

On Wed, 21 Apr 2021 10:46:34 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"
wrote:

This is the best overall explanation Ive come across. It reflects in one
place the bits and pieces of the story Ive seen in the Wall St. Journal and
other reliable sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e1_6kHG8zc&t=53s


Just got this from SWMBO.

"I won't say lumber prices are high. I wanted to build a birdhouse but
the bank turned down my loan."
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