Woodworking (rec.woodworking) Discussion forum covering all aspects of working with wood. All levels of expertise are encouraged to particiapte.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
TWS
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Dave Balderstone
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

In article , TWS
wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?


Calling it a "toad" would make no sense at all, would it?
  #3   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
PDQ
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"TWS" wrote in message ...
| Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?
|
| Thanks in advance,
| TWS

"Frog" is probably a corruption of the word "froe" which means :a cutting tool with one end of its blade fastened at right angles to a short handle. Use: to split wood along the grain to make shingles or barrel staves". Could also originate in the Anglo-Saxon word meaning "from" as in "to remove shavings from".
--
PDQ

--

  #4   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Josh
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

If he's flying first class, he's usually called "Sir" or "Mr. Frog".

Leonard Bailey, the original inventor, never mentions the name "Frog"
in his patent in 1858. Later after Stanley bought him out, Traut
patented an improved lateral adjustment where he mentions the "frog",
but he gives no clue as to the origin of the term.

A horse's hoof has a wedge-shaped structure called a frog. Maybe it
was the similarity in shape?

Josh


TWS wrote:
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS


  #5   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
CW
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

They didn't think Aardvark sounded to good.

"TWS" wrote in message
...
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS





  #6   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George E. Cawthon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

TWS wrote:
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS


Suggest you buy a good dictionary.
The answer is there are all sorts of things call a
frog that look similar. Most are a lump of
something (like a frog squatting). The horses
foot part is a good answer but it also is just a
lump of something.
  #7   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
RicodJour
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?


TWS wrote:
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?


Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R

  #8   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Lobby Dosser
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"RicodJour" wrote:


TWS wrote:
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?


Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R



More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about halfway down
for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch
  #9   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
todd
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"Lobby Dosser" wrote in message
news:LIk0g.8875$MU4.2412@trnddc03...
"RicodJour" wrote:


TWS wrote:
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?


Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R



More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about halfway down
for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch


Reminds me of when I was working as a mechanical engineer. We were working
with a company in Memphis, TN on a steel part that was going to be forged.
The company was Conley Frog and Switch. Not knowing rail terminology at the
time, I thought it was an unusual name.

todd


  #10   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George E. Cawthon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

Lobby Dosser wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote:


TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?


Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about halfway down
for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch


Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.


  #11   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Jeff Gorman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?


"TWS" wrote in message
...
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?


Because it gets in your throat.

Jeff G
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
ISP is clara.co.uk
www.amgron.clara.net


  #12   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Lobby Dosser
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

Lobby Dosser wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote:


TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about halfway
down for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch


Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.


Such as ...
  #13   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Bush Carpenter
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?


"Lobby Dosser" wrote in message
news:nsn0g.6121$yQ.1935@trnddc07...
"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

Lobby Dosser wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote:


TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about
halfway
down for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch


Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.


Such as ...


Perhaps ...

Part of a violin bow

Part of a horse-drawn mouldboard plough

Device to attach a sword/scabbard/bayonet/axe to a belt or sling



  #14   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Lobby Dosser
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"Bush Carpenter" wrote:


"Lobby Dosser" wrote in message
news:nsn0g.6121$yQ.1935@trnddc07...
"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

Lobby Dosser wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote:


TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about
halfway
down for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch

Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.


Such as ...


Perhaps ...

Part of a violin bow


The bit at the end? (not hand end)


Part of a horse-drawn mouldboard plough

Device to attach a sword/scabbard/bayonet/axe to a belt or sling


Didn't know any of those.

Why do you suppose so many bits in so many different applications are
called frog?






  #15   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
C&S
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?


"George E. Cawthon" wrote in message
...
TWS wrote:
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS


Suggest you buy a good dictionary.


From webster's unabridged:

3 a (1) : a looped device attached to a belt for holding a weapon or tool
(2) : a front fastening for a garment (as a coat, jacket, dress) that is
made usually of braid in an ornamental looped design with a bar-shaped
button or thick knot on one edge of the opening to fit into a loop on the
other b : a device made of rail sections constructed and assembled to permit
the wheels on one rail of a track to cross another rail of an intersecting
track c : a shallow place for mortar in the upper face of a brick d : the
frame or block to which the share, moldboard, landside, or beam of a plow
are secured e : the nut of a violin bow : HEEL -- see BOW illustration f (1)
: the junction of two branches of a flume (2) : a guiding timber at the
mouth of a slide g : a device for supporting and mutually insulating trolley
wires that cross each other h : the seat for the plane iron in the stock of
a carpenter's plane i : a loom device that actuates a stop motion when the
shuttle is out of position


--
NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth


  #16   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
bob kater
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

someone has way to much time on their hands, and I need my house painted
"TWS" wrote in message
...
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS



  #17   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
CW
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?


"Lobby Dosser" wrote in message
news:nsn0g.6121$yQ.1935@trnddc07...
"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

Lobby Dosser wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote:


TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about halfway
down for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch


Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.


Such as ...


Frogs.


  #18   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
RicodJour
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

Lobby Dosser wrote:

Why do you suppose so many bits in so many different applications are
called frog?


Probably because they reminded people of a frog shape/form.

The typical scenario is for someone, unfamiliar with an item, to
compare it to something that reminds them by some characteristic(s).
The other common scenario is for someone to hear someone mention the
item in question, and not knowing the correct spelling or
pronounciation, morph the word into something that it sounded like or
that they are more familiar with.

R

  #19   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
EXT
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

Also the wedge shape of a train rail switch, where one rail crosses another
is called a frog.

"Josh" wrote in message
oups.com...
If he's flying first class, he's usually called "Sir" or "Mr. Frog".

Leonard Bailey, the original inventor, never mentions the name "Frog"
in his patent in 1858. Later after Stanley bought him out, Traut
patented an improved lateral adjustment where he mentions the "frog",
but he gives no clue as to the origin of the term.

A horse's hoof has a wedge-shaped structure called a frog. Maybe it
was the similarity in shape?

Josh


TWS wrote:
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS




  #20   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

hmmmm .. .. ..

WHY is a frog called a frog ?? ?? ??


EXT wrote:
Also the wedge shape of a train rail switch, where one rail crosses another
is called a frog.

"Josh" wrote in message
oups.com...

If he's flying first class, he's usually called "Sir" or "Mr. Frog".

Leonard Bailey, the original inventor, never mentions the name "Frog"
in his patent in 1858. Later after Stanley bought him out, Traut
patented an improved lateral adjustment where he mentions the "frog",
but he gives no clue as to the origin of the term.

A horse's hoof has a wedge-shaped structure called a frog. Maybe it
was the similarity in shape?

Josh


TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS






  #21   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Han
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"__ Bob __" wrote in news:Qvu0g.45$J52.2
@fe06.lga:

hmmmm .. .. ..

WHY is a frog called a frog ?? ?? ??


Actually the animal's name is kikker (dutch) or Rana (latin), or ...
whatever.

--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  #22   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Leuf
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

On Sun, 16 Apr 2006 00:49:48 GMT, TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?


Because if you can get SWMBO to kiss it, it will transform into a L-N.


-Leuf
  #23   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?


"Han" wrote in message
...
"__ Bob __" wrote in news:Qvu0g.45$J52.2
@fe06.lga:

hmmmm .. .. ..

WHY is a frog called a frog ?? ?? ??


Actually the animal's name is kikker (dutch) or Rana (latin), or ...
whatever.


Lyagushka.


  #24   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George E. Cawthon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

Lobby Dosser wrote:
"George E. Cawthon" wrote:


Lobby Dosser wrote:

"RicodJour" wrote:



TWS wrote:


Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about halfway
down for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch


Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.



Such as ...

If you don't have one, now is a good time to get a
copy of the Websters 3rd International dictionary.
  #25   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George E. Cawthon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

Bush Carpenter wrote:
"Lobby Dosser" wrote in message
news:nsn0g.6121$yQ.1935@trnddc07...

"George E. Cawthon" wrote:


Lobby Dosser wrote:

"RicodJour" wrote:



TWS wrote:


Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about
halfway
down for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch

Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.


Such as ...



Perhaps ...

Part of a violin bow

Part of a horse-drawn mouldboard plough

Device to attach a sword/scabbard/bayonet/axe to a belt or sling



Oh hell, you should have made him work for it.


  #26   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George E. Cawthon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

Lobby Dosser wrote:
"Bush Carpenter" wrote:


"Lobby Dosser" wrote in message
news:nsn0g.6121$yQ.1935@trnddc07...

"George E. Cawthon" wrote:


Lobby Dosser wrote:

"RicodJour" wrote:



TWS wrote:


Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about
halfway
down for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch

Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.


Such as ...


Perhaps ...

Part of a violin bow



The bit at the end? (not hand end)


Part of a horse-drawn mouldboard plough

Device to attach a sword/scabbard/bayonet/axe to a belt or sling



Didn't know any of those.

Why do you suppose so many bits in so many different applications are
called frog?






We answered that!

The part on the tip of a bow is just the tip of
the bow, the frog is the par that adjusts the tension.
  #27   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George E. Cawthon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

bob kater wrote:
someone has way to much time on their hands, and I need my house painted
"TWS" wrote in message
...

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS




No body paints with a frog!
  #28   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George E. Cawthon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

I think you have that a bit messed up and some of
the descriptions are bit unclear.

I believe a frog has nothing to do with a switch,
and rails don't really cross another. What the
rails do is form a cross, often sharply angled and
the piece of rail that is part of the intersection
is the frog. It could be that I am mistaken and
the pivot anchor for the swinging arm of a switch
is also called a frog, but I believe it is just a
part of the switch.

EXT wrote:
Also the wedge shape of a train rail switch, where one rail crosses another
is called a frog.

"Josh" wrote in message
oups.com...

If he's flying first class, he's usually called "Sir" or "Mr. Frog".

Leonard Bailey, the original inventor, never mentions the name "Frog"
in his patent in 1858. Later after Stanley bought him out, Traut
patented an improved lateral adjustment where he mentions the "frog",
but he gives no clue as to the origin of the term.

A horse's hoof has a wedge-shaped structure called a frog. Maybe it
was the similarity in shape?

Josh


TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS




  #29   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
TWS
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

On 15 Apr 2006 22:26:18 -0700, "RicodJour"
wrote:


TWS wrote:
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?


Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R

Yes, I can see that now. Good suggestion, thanks for replying.
Probably explains it other uses as well.

Thanks to all who attempted to answer my question.
TWS
  #30   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Morris Dovey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

Han (in ) said:

| "__ Bob __" wrote in
| news:Qvu0g.45$J52.2 @fe06.lga:
|
|| hmmmm .. .. ..
||
|| WHY is a frog called a frog ?? ?? ??
||
|
| Actually the animal's name is kikker (dutch) or Rana (latin), or ...
| whatever.

....Kroakenhopper ?

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto




  #31   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Doug Payne
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

On 16/04/2006 12:44 PM, __ Bob __ wrote:
hmmmm .. .. ..

WHY is a frog called a frog ?? ?? ??


Because it tastes like chicken.
  #32   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Oleg Lego
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

The Morris Dovey entity posted thusly:

Han (in ) said:

| "__ Bob __" wrote in
| news:Qvu0g.45$J52.2 @fe06.lga:
|
|| hmmmm .. .. ..
||
|| WHY is a frog called a frog ?? ?? ??
||
|
| Actually the animal's name is kikker (dutch) or Rana (latin), or ...
| whatever.

...Kroakenhopper ?


Quebecois?

  #34   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Oleg Lego
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

The Morris Dovey entity posted thusly:

Oleg Lego (in ) said:

| The Morris Dovey entity posted thusly:
|
|| ...Kroakenhopper ?
|
| Quebecois?

Severely fractured German :-)


No! Quebecois is another name for a frog.

  #35   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Lobby Dosser
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"RicodJour" wrote:

Lobby Dosser wrote:

Why do you suppose so many bits in so many different applications are
called frog?


Probably because they reminded people of a frog shape/form.

The typical scenario is for someone, unfamiliar with an item, to
compare it to something that reminds them by some characteristic(s).
The other common scenario is for someone to hear someone mention the
item in question, and not knowing the correct spelling or
pronounciation, morph the word into something that it sounded like or
that they are more familiar with.

R


None of them look like a frog. Bet there's something else.


  #36   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Lobby Dosser
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"CW" wrote:


"Lobby Dosser" wrote in message
news:nsn0g.6121$yQ.1935@trnddc07...
"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

Lobby Dosser wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote:


TWS wrote:

Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Because it looks like a frog sitting on its haunches.

http://www.nature.ca/notebooks/images/leopfrog.gif

R




More likely to have come from railroad terminology. See about
halfway down for 'frog'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch

Railroading possibly made the term more common,
but there were things called frogs long before
railroads.


Such as ...


Frogs.




They could have called them Newts. )
  #37   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Lobby Dosser
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

"__ Bob __" wrote:


hmmmm .. .. ..

WHY is a frog called a frog ?? ?? ??


If it wasn't, no one would recognize it.
  #38   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
gary in virginia
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?


"TWS" wrote in message
...
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS


Seems I read somewhere it is called a frog because it is something which is
lodged in the throat, i.e. "a frog in the throat". Probably a frog is just
a lump of something, be it a wedge, a hoof, or a wad of snot.

Gary


  #39   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
RicodJour
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?

gary in virginia (NOSPAM NOSPAM NOSPAM) wrote:
"TWS" wrote in message
...
Can anyone give me the reason a 'frog' is called a frog?

Thanks in advance,
TWS


Seems I read somewhere it is called a frog because it is something which is
lodged in the throat, i.e. "a frog in the throat". Probably a frog is just
a lump of something, be it a wedge, a hoof, or a wad of snot.


Or, more likely, the croak emitting from someone's mouth was playfully
attributed to an animal that croaks being lodged in the throat. Like a
frog.

R

  #40   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
RicodJour
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why is a Frog on a plane called a Frog?


Lobby Dosser wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote:

Lobby Dosser wrote:

Why do you suppose so many bits in so many different applications are
called frog?


Probably because they reminded people of a frog shape/form.

The typical scenario is for someone, unfamiliar with an item, to
compare it to something that reminds them by some characteristic(s).
The other common scenario is for someone to hear someone mention the
item in question, and not knowing the correct spelling or
pronounciation, morph the word into something that it sounded like or
that they are more familiar with.

R


None of them look like a frog. Bet there's something else.


Kind of like arguing the results of a Rorshach test. The comparison
characteristic just has to remind someone - it's not designed to
resemble an animal.

R

Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Chantecler Windows and Doors Brian White Home Repair 3 June 6th 16 11:22 PM
De plane has arrived! David Woodworking 7 November 15th 05 02:29 AM
FAQ: HAND TOOLS (Repost) Groggy Woodworking 0 January 16th 05 10:56 AM
Speaking of Lee Valley: Review of large shoulder plane Conan the Librarian Woodworking 4 September 8th 04 12:59 PM
A few hand plane questions toller Woodworking 28 August 6th 04 09:34 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:04 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"