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BillyBob
 
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Default Pecan

I've come across a source of pecan that is virtually unlimited and free.
Does anyone have any experience working with or finishing pecan? What can
you tell me about it?

Bob


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Phil at small (vs at large)
 
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It's been a really long time since I've worked with pecan, but it is
pretty hard-- It's a member of the Walnut family-- as are butternut
and hickory. Walnut & butternut are the softer woods & hickory and
pecan are the harder woods. The grain is really nice. The last pecan
I saw had a lot of knots. Use a sharp blade. The color is more like
hickory. I believe it is an open grained wood like black walnut, but
could be wrong. I just did a quick search on Google using
"woodworking"+pecan
as a search string & came up with 15000 hits

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wildbill
 
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A lot of wood stores that sell you pecan are really selling hickory and
vice-versa. Almost impossible to tell them apart with just the naked
(or dressed) eye

Second the sharp-blade comment. It does finish beautifully. Hope to
one day redo kitchen cabinets in the stuff.

Bill W

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toller
 
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My experience is with hickory, but as someone else said, they are pretty
much the same. It is very very different than walnut.

It is very hard and brittle; it tears out badly when routing and is tough to
cut.

For the right application it is a pretty wood; but I wouldn't use it
anywhere that required a lot of work. Making a frame out of it would be a
real exercise; probably a poor choice even when free.



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BillyBob
 
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"BillyBob" wrote in message
k.net...
I've come across a source of pecan that is virtually unlimited and free.
Does anyone have any experience working with or finishing pecan? What can
you tell me about it?


Thanks for the replies. Your responses were fairly consistent. I saw a
country club house done with the pecan (paneling, solid wood doors, window
casements) and it was nice looking. I'll give it a try on something that
would use the wood as a facing and see how it does.

Bob




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Jay Britton
 
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"wildbill" wrote in message
oups.com...
A lot of wood stores that sell you pecan are really selling hickory and
vice-versa. Almost impossible to tell them apart with just the naked
(or dressed) eye

Second the sharp-blade comment. It does finish beautifully. Hope to
one day redo kitchen cabinets in the stuff.

Bill W


How does one tell the difference?


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Glen
 
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BillyBob wrote:

I've come across a source of pecan that is virtually unlimited and free.
Does anyone have any experience working with or finishing pecan? What can
you tell me about it?

Bob


This is probably more than you want to know about pecan.

(from: http://www.exotichardwoods-northamer...canhickory.htm )


Mechanical Values

Category Green Dry Units
Weight 47 lbs/cu.ft.
Density (air-dry) lbs/cu.ft.
Specific Gravity 0.60 0.66
Hardness 1820 lbs
Stiffness 1370 1730 1000 psi
Bending Strength 9800 13700 psi
Shearing Strength 2080 psi
Max. Crushing Strength 3990 7850 psi
Work to Maximum Load 15 14 in-lbs/in3
Radial Shrinkage (G-OD) %
Tangential Shrink. (G-OD) %
Volumetric Shrink (G-OD) %

Environmental Profile
Pecan is rather widespread, abundant, and secure globally, although it
may be rare in some areas at the periphery of its range (Source - The
Nature Conservancy - Rank of relative endangerment based primarily on
the number of occurrences of the species globally).

Distribution
This species is reported to be distributed in Alabama, Arkansas,
Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland,
Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Great Smoky Mountain National
Park, Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Texas, and Virginia. It is usually found in mixed hardwood forests, and
prefers to grow in moist, well-drained soils of river flood plains and
valleys.

Product Sources
It is not known at present whether timber from this species is
obtainable from sustainably managed or other environmentally responsible
sources.

Pecan is reported to be available at a moderate price on the U.S. market
in the form of lumber, veneers and plywood.

Tree Data
The state tree of Texas, Pecan is reported to occur in the wild and is
also cultivated. The largest member of the Hickories, it usually grows
to heights of about 160 to 170 feet (49 to 52 m), with trunk diameters
of about 72 to 84 inches (180 to 213 cm). Pecan trees are reported to
have very long lives, with some trees reaching the age of 350 years.

Sapwood Color
The sapwood is white to pale brown in color.

Heartwood Color
The heartwood is rich reddish brown in color, and may contain streaks of
slightly darker hue.

Grain
Grain is reported to be typically straight, but may occasionally be
irregular or wavy.

Texture
The wood has a coarse texture.

Odor
There is no characteristic odor or taste.

Ease of Drying
The material is reported to dry fairly easily and rapidly, although it
requires care because of fairly high shrinkage.

Drying Defects
Slow drying with poor air circulation may cause chemical sapwood stains.
End checks and hairline splits may also occur.

Kiln Schedules
T8 - D3 (4/4); T6 - D1 (8/4) US

Movement in Service
The timber is reported to have high dimensional stability, and holds its
place well in use.

Natural Durability
Pecan is reported to be vulnerable to the hickory bark beetle, and also
succumb easily to frost damage. It is also susceptible to attack by
fungi and insects.

Resistance to Impregnation
The wood is moderately resistant to preservative treatment.

Mineral Deposits
Magnesium carbonate deposits are reported to be often present and 'Bird
pecks' leave residue that crystallizes.

Blunting Effect
Blunting effect on cutting edges is reported to vary from moderate to
severe.

Cutting Resistance
The wood is reported to be rather difficult to saw.

Planing
Pecan is reported to require careful machining, but it planes well,
although a reduced cutting angle of 20 degrees is recommended in working
stock with irregular grain.

Turning
The wood is characteristically very easy to turn.

Moulding
A reduced cutting angle of 20 degrees is required in moulding wood
containing irregular grain.

Boring
Boring properties are reported to be very good.

Mortising
The wood has exceptional mortising properties.

Gluing
Gluing properties are reported to be satisfactory.

Nailing
The material is reported to respond rather poorly to nailing.

Screwing
The wood is fairly easy to screw.

Sanding
The timber is reported to require careful sanding to achieve the
smoothest surface.

Polishing
The wood responds to polishing to yield a smooth finish.

Staining
The material takes stains well.

Steam Bending
Steam bending properties are reported to be generally good.

Strength Properties
Pecans can be differentiated from true Hickories by weight, and by the
narrow bands of parenchyma, which appear between the rays and between
the large earlywood pores. (In hickories the band occurs after the first
row of earlywood pores). Strength properties of C. illinoensis are
reported to be similar to those of other hickories. Bending strength in
the air-dry condition (about 12 percent moisture content) is high, and
maximum crushing strength, or compression strength parallel to grain, is
also high. It is hard - harder than Teak, and does not marr or dent
easily. The wood is very heavy.
  #8   Report Post  
George E. Cawthon
 
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Glen wrote:
BillyBob wrote:

I've come across a source of pecan that is virtually unlimited and free.
Does anyone have any experience working with or finishing pecan? What
can
you tell me about it?

Bob


This is probably more than you want to know about pecan.

(from: http://www.exotichardwoods-northamer...canhickory.htm )

((snipped))
Lots of interesting information since we have no
Pecan here.

Most interesting was resistance to impregnation.
Has to be very high since you never see a
pregnant pecan tree.
  #9   Report Post  
BillyBob
 
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"Glen" wrote in message
news
This is probably more than you want to know about pecan.


Thanks, Glen. I was not familiar with this source. I especially liked the
anecdotal comments about all the woodworking operations with the wood. That
was very helpful.

Bob


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Swingman
 
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"BillyBob" wrote in message

I've come across a source of pecan that is virtually unlimited and free.
Does anyone have any experience working with or finishing pecan? What can
you tell me about it?


My maternal grandfather, who passed away in the late 50's, left behind a lot
of "native" pecan furniture cut from his farm in S. Louisiana.

Wonderful wood for furniture, IME (though you need sharp tools/blades) -
especially if you like a natural, unstained finish (pecan takes an oil/poly
finish that looks terrific)... personally I'd take all I had room for, then
some.

There must be a regional thing about pecan and hickory being the pretty much
the same. Depending upon the variety, there is a notable difference between
pecan and hickory in the tone of the final product when finished, at least
in the species we get down here in S.E. Texas.

.... and despite the "native" variety still being relatively easy to find, it
is not cheap at the wood suppliers hereabouts.

My dream dining room table, as yet unrealized, is made from pecan, finished
with a hand rubbed oil/poly ... one of these days.

--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/07/05




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Dave in Fairfax
 
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"George E. Cawthon" wrote:
snip
Lots of interesting information since we have no
Pecan here.
Most interesting was resistance to impregnation.
Has to be very high since you never see a
pregnant pecan tree.


That sorta makes sense. Seems to me that once upon a time I was told
that hickory and pecan were the male and female of the same species. I
don't know that ot's true, but it *would* explain why you don't see
preggers pecans. Unless I'm wrong about what burls are...

Dave in Fairfax
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RonB
 
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It is a fairly common hardwood in SE Kansas/NE Oklahoma area. Very pretty
grain and works about like walnut. When finshed close to natural color it
is similar to Hickory but has a look of its own.

RonB


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dadiOH
 
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Jay Britton wrote:
"wildbill" wrote in message
oups.com...
A lot of wood stores that sell you pecan are really selling hickory
and vice-versa. Almost impossible to tell them apart with just the
naked (or dressed) eye

Second the sharp-blade comment. It does finish beautifully. Hope to
one day redo kitchen cabinets in the stuff.

Bill W


How does one tell the difference?


Realistically, you don't. Pecan is in the genus "Carya". So are all
the hickories. There are many species of "hickory", pecan being one.

BTW, walnut and butternut are in the genus "Juglans"...there is no close
relationship between them and the hickories.

--
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____________________________

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....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
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Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico


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diyguy
 
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Sounds like you might be someone good to know if you live close by ;-}

BillyBob wrote:
I've come across a source of pecan that is virtually unlimited and free.
Does anyone have any experience working with or finishing pecan? What can
you tell me about it?

Bob


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Kevin Craig
 
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In article t,
BillyBob wrote:

I've come across a source of pecan that is virtually unlimited and free.
Does anyone have any experience working with or finishing pecan? What can
you tell me about it?


Others have responded with specifics, but I'll note this: pecan is a
short-trunked, "limby" tree, branching prolifically. The bulk of the
lumber is likely to be from limbs, thus only available in
short-to-medium lengths. The growth rings will be assymetric, as is
common in all limbs.

That aside, it's lovely wood. But to be honest, I think it's best used
to fuel the smoker when a brisket or butt is meeting its fate. :-)

Kevin


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Glen
 
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George E. Cawthon wrote:
Glen wrote:

BillyBob wrote:

I've come across a source of pecan that is virtually unlimited and free.
Does anyone have any experience working with or finishing pecan?
What can
you tell me about it?

Bob


This is probably more than you want to know about pecan.

(from: http://www.exotichardwoods-northamer...canhickory.htm )

((snipped))
Lots of interesting information since we have no Pecan here.

Most interesting was resistance to impregnation. Has to be very high
since you never see a pregnant pecan tree.


I think they are male trees. You can tell by their nuts.

;-0

Glen
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Kevin Craig wrote:
...

Others have responded with specifics, but I'll note this: pecan is a
short-trunked, "limby" tree, branching prolifically. The bulk of the
lumber is likely to be from limbs, thus only available in
short-to-medium lengths. The growth rings will be assymetric, as is
common in all limbs.


As OP noted:

http://www.exotichardwoods-nor thamerica.com/pecanhickory.htm

... Pecan is reported to occur in the wild and is
also cultivated. The largest member of the Hickories,
it usually grows to heights of about 160 to 170 feet
(49 to 52 m)...

'Short and limby' sounds like orchard trees. Most hardwoods
will grow short and limby if they grow without competation
from nearby trees. And, picking pecans from the top of a
160 ft tree would be problematic.

A 'near unlimited supply' of wood may well be orchard wood.

--

FF

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Dave Mundt
 
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Greetings and salutations...

On 11 Aug 2005 13:41:41 -0700, "Phil at small (vs at large)"
wrote:

It's been a really long time since I've worked with pecan, but it is
pretty hard-- It's a member of the Walnut family-- as are butternut
and hickory. Walnut & butternut are the softer woods & hickory and
pecan are the harder woods. The grain is really nice. The last pecan
I saw had a lot of knots. Use a sharp blade. The color is more like
hickory. I believe it is an open grained wood like black walnut, but
could be wrong. I just did a quick search on Google using
"woodworking"+pecan
as a search string & came up with 15000 hits

Well, a friend of mine and I spent some time putting together
a really nice workbench out of some 8/4 Pecan from a local
lumber yard (Jeffery's Woodworks...a GREAT source of wonderful
wood of all sorts...not cheap but great stuff). It was VERY
hard, and, very dusty to run through the planer, but, produced
a spectacular workbench top.
As it worked out, we were able to book-match slices
across the bench, so, it looked rather like a slice from a
trunk that was about 30" thick. One FINE looking workbench
if I say so myself.
Regards
Dave Mundt

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