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Default Telescopic ladders

Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters, don't need to get on
the roof. I have a suitable double extension already, but sometimes
getting it through the house to the back is a problem.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from using it?




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Default Telescopic ladders

On 17/09/2017 16:47, TMH wrote:
Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters, don't need to get on
the roof. I have a suitable double extension already, but sometimes
getting it through the house to the back is a problem.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from using it?





I had a pair (some ******* stole them).

Very useful.

You do not want to be working at 5m with them unless you want to spend
serious money on a pair.

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Default Telescopic ladders

On 17/09/2017 16:47, TMH wrote:
Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters, don't need to get on
the roof. I have a suitable double extension already, but sometimes
getting it through the house to the back is a problem.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from using it?


I have a set. I find them very useful at times and I can transport them
in the boot of the car. They are heavier than the equivalent 'domestic'
quality aluminium ladder that I also own. Because of the telescopic
nature of the beast the tubular sections at the bottom are larger than
the top I and the more sections you have the larger the bottom section -
in general this it what makes it heavier. I have the 3.5m version but
I'm not sure that the design concept is suitable for much longer versions.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I
want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from
using it?


If you want half height you leave all the top rungs bunched together.
You open from the bottom.

See example instructions
http://www.ladderstore.com/media/upl...der-Manual.pdf

They sometimes can be a PITA to collapse. Once the ladder has had weight
on it the catches sometimes jam in the locked position - you have to
watch your fingers as the rungs meet each other when collapsed (aka a
blunt guillotine) so when trying to free the catches make sure that you
fingers are clear of the lower rungs.


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Default Telescopic ladders

On 17/09/2017 17:32, alan_m wrote:
On 17/09/2017 16:47, TMH wrote:
Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters, don't need to get on
the roof. I have a suitable double extension already, but sometimes
getting it through the house to the back is a problem.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I
want to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from
using it?


I have a set.* I find them very useful at times and I can transport them
in the boot of the car. They are heavier than the equivalent 'domestic'
quality aluminium ladder that I also own. Because of the telescopic
nature of the beast the tubular sections at the bottom are larger than
the top I and the more sections you have the larger the bottom section -
in general this it what makes it heavier. I have the 3.5m version but
I'm not sure that the design concept is suitable for much longer versions.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I
want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from
using it?


If you want half height you leave all the top rungs bunched together.
You open from the bottom.

See example instructions
http://www.ladderstore.com/media/upl...der-Manual.pdf

They sometimes can be a PITA to collapse. Once the ladder has had weight
on it the catches sometimes jam in the locked position - you have to
watch your fingers as the rungs meet each other when collapsed (aka a
blunt guillotine) so when trying to free the catches make sure that you
fingers are clear of the lower rungs.


Sometimes called surveyors' ladders, for obvious reasons. I also have a
3.5. Very useful because of the portability. +1 about watching your
fingers (but I don't have sticking problems with mine).
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Default Telescopic ladders


"TMH" wrote in message
news
Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters, don't need to get on the
roof. I have a suitable double extension already, but sometimes getting it
through the house to the back is a problem.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from using
it?




bloody dangerous things and you can lose a finger...I have all three sizes
........




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Default Telescopic ladders

On Sunday, 17 September 2017 16:47:09 UTC+1, TMH wrote:

Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters, don't need to get on
the roof. I have a suitable double extension already, but sometimes
getting it through the house to the back is a problem.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from using it?


I don't have one. I can't help thinking the folding multisection ladders, which I do have, are a lot more useful.

What height? Would you like us to come & measure your house?


NT
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In message , Jim GM4DHJ ...
writes
bloody dangerous things and you can lose a finger...


I've seen someone almost lose a finger when up one of these. Not sure
exactly what happened.
On the other hand, this week one of the catches stuck on my folding
ladder and I trapped a finger, but that was just painful.
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Default Telescopic ladders

On Sunday, 17 September 2017 17:32:12 UTC+1, alan_m wrote:
They sometimes can be a PITA to collapse. Once the ladder has had weight
on it the catches sometimes jam in the locked position - you have to
watch your fingers as the rungs meet each other when collapsed (aka a
blunt guillotine) so when trying to free the catches make sure that you
fingers are clear of the lower rungs.


Not advisable for nudists then

Owain

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Default Telescopic ladders


"Bill" wrote in message
...
In message , Jim GM4DHJ ...
writes
bloody dangerous things and you can lose a finger...


I've seen someone almost lose a finger when up one of these. Not sure
exactly what happened.
On the other hand, this week one of the catches stuck on my folding ladder
and I trapped a finger, but that was just painful.


bloody chinky junk ... factory shop are doing the longest one for 59 up
here at the moment .....good price


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wrote in message
...
On Sunday, 17 September 2017 17:32:12 UTC+1, alan_m wrote:
They sometimes can be a PITA to collapse. Once the ladder has had weight
on it the catches sometimes jam in the locked position - you have to
watch your fingers as the rungs meet each other when collapsed (aka a
blunt guillotine) so when trying to free the catches make sure that you
fingers are clear of the lower rungs.


Not advisable for nudists then

Owain

the space between the rungs are to bloody big as well ......




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Default Telescopic ladders

TMH wrote:

Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?


I've used one provided by a school to reach the double height ceiling in
their hall, I'm no lightweight and they didn't feel flimsy.

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters


I just use my two section extension ladder with a stand-off to reach
guttering.

don't need to get on the roof. I have a suitable double extension
already, but sometimes getting it through the house to the back is a
problem.

Ah, understood; I can take mine out the front or rear of the garage.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.


You should get away with a little less than that, depending on height of
eaves (2 x 2.4m ?) and your own height, e.g assuming you want to stand a
few rungs down so your shoulders are just above gutter height, and
allowing for the angle of the ladder.

ISTR they have longer than standard spacing, so might not fit a
stand-off, without one I find the gutters are in my face.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from using it?


I think you can extend the 'spare' rungs to the top or leave them at the
bottom, but then you have to step over them.
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Default Telescopic ladders

On 17/09/17 16:47, TMH wrote:
Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters, don't need to get on
the roof. I have a suitable double extension already, but sometimes
getting it through the house to the back is a problem.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from using it?


I have a Youngman 3.3m

If you want to use it fully extended then you start extending from the top

here are two (2) ways to open your ladder. Full extension or extension to any interim height.


1. To open the ladder to any interim height,
always open from bottom upwards,
proceeding as follows:
a. Using both hands, grasp the outside edges of
the plastic ring directly above the rung with
locking rings.
2nd plastic ring from the bottom.
b. Pull up and fully extend that section. Continue
extending the ladder as desired in step 1a, until
you reach the desired height.
c. Once you reach the desired height, lock the
highest fully opened section by raising the
section above approximately 15cm.
An audible click will be heard as the highest
section is extended past 15cm indicating that
the sections below are locked.
d. Check that the rung locking levers for all fully
opened sections are at an angle of approximately
60 degrees, indicating that the locking
mechanisms are properly engaged.
Check that the bottom locking levers with pull
rings are locked in the up position (Figure 6).
e. If any levers are not in the locked position
collapse the ladder and repeat steps 1a to
1d inclusive.


1. To open ladder to full height, use the following
procedure.
Starting with the top rung, open each section to
its full extension. Figure 8. Continue until all
sections are fully open.
c. Check all the locking levers are at an
angle of approximately 60 degrees, indicating
that the locking mechanisms are properly
engaged.
Check that the bottom locking levers with pull
rings are locked in the up position (Figure 9).







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wrote in message
...
On Sunday, 17 September 2017 16:47:09 UTC+1, TMH wrote:

Anyone used one of these telescopic ladders?

The main use will be cleaning/repairing gutters, don't need to get on
the roof. I have a suitable double extension already, but sometimes
getting it through the house to the back is a problem.

So, what height do I need? They seem to only go up to 5 metres.

Also, I understand that you extend them from the top, upwards. If I want
to use it at half height, will the bottom portion prevent me from using
it?


I don't have one. I can't help thinking the folding multisection ladders,
which I do have, are a lot more useful.


Not as easy to put in the boot of the car or carry thru a house.

What height? Would you like us to come & measure your house?



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Default Telescopic ladders

On 17/09/2017 21:39, Rod Speed wrote:


wrote in message



I don't have one. I can't help thinking the folding multisection
ladders, which I do have, are a lot more useful.


Not as easy to put in the boot of the car or carry thru a* house.


I used a friends good quality folding multi-section ladder about a month
ago to clear out guttering on a terrace house but I wasn't too happy
with its length - I had it leaning too much to the vertical to get the
top 6 inches below the gutter. It was the kind that folds up into 4
sections - 3 hinges. The smallest width of the folder ladder was around
2/3rds of the width of a standard doorway and it could fit into the boot
of a family sized car.

When climbing ladders I do recommend safety boots/shoes with a steel toe
cap and embedded steel sole. Although the sole plate is designed to stop
nail puncture etc. I find it also gives a great degree of comfort when
standing on a ladder tread for an extended length of time. If you are
not into fashion suitable shoes can be purchased from, say, toolsatan
for £17 and possibly cheaper elsewhere (mine came from Aldi/Lidl at
around £12 when they had them in their until they are gone offers)



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Default Telescopic ladders

On 17/09/2017 22:24, alan_m wrote:
On 17/09/2017 21:39, Rod Speed wrote:


wrote in message



I don't have one. I can't help thinking the folding multisection
ladders, which I do have, are a lot more useful.


Not as easy to put in the boot of the car or carry thru a* house.


I used a friends good quality folding multi-section ladder about a month
ago to clear out guttering on a terrace house but I wasn't too happy
with its length - I had it leaning too much to the vertical to get the
top 6 inches below the gutter. It was the kind that folds up into 4
sections - 3 hinges.* The smallest width of the folder ladder was around
2/3rds of the width of a standard doorway and it could fit into the boot
of a family sized car.


Exactly my experience and the reason I'm looking for alternatives.





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The Medway Handyman


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alan_m wrote
Rod Speed wrote
wrote in message


I don't have one. I can't help thinking the folding multisection
ladders, which I do have, are a lot more useful.


Not as easy to put in the boot of the car or carry thru a house.


I used a friends good quality folding multi-section ladder about a month
ago to clear out guttering on a terrace house but I wasn't too happy with
its length - I had it leaning too much to the vertical to get the top 6
inches below the gutter.


Mine is a flat roof and the gutters are mostly literally
about a foot wide, so I only use the ladder to get onto
the roof and walk around on the roof and use a spade
to shovel whats in the gutter off onto the ground.

I'm not all that keen on getting off the ladder onto the
roof and back down again after I have done the gutters
and have been considering making a full fixed sort of
combination stairs and ladder with proper side rails to
use instead now that I am older but have never got
around to doing that.

It was the kind that folds up into 4 sections - 3 hinges. The smallest
width of the folder ladder was around 2/3rds of the width of a standard
doorway and it could fit into the boot of a family sized car.


I have one of those too and its easy enough to get from
the garage yard sale in the back of a small hatch, but I
normally have the back seats folded flat all the time and
essentially use it as a small station wagon, what you lot
call an estate. A Hyundai Getz, one of the small hatches.

In fact I have got plenty of full ladders home
from garage sales that way with the back
door left open. Not ideal when going far tho.

When climbing ladders I do recommend safety boots/shoes with a steel toe
cap and embedded steel sole. Although the sole plate is designed to stop
nail puncture etc. I find it also gives a great degree of comfort when
standing on a ladder tread for an extended length of time.


I dont normally stand on ladders for long. When I was building the
house on a bare block of land one of the first things I made was a
large steel workbench with a removable half length top frame out
of 25mm RHS with wheels and just move that around outside and
stand on it when doing the eaves and barge board etc.

If you are not into fashion suitable shoes can be purchased from, say,
toolsatan for £17 and possibly cheaper elsewhere (mine came from Aldi/Lidl
at around £12 when they had them in their until they are gone offers)


I only wear elastic sided boots and avoid steel capped boots.
https://www.totallyworkwear.com.au/m...-480_BLA_1.jpg


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On 17/09/2017 23:46, Rod Speed wrote:

I'm not all that keen on getting off the ladder onto the
roof and back down again after I have done the gutters
and have been considering making a full fixed sort of
combination stairs and ladder with proper side rails to
use instead now that I am older but have never got
around to doing that.


If climbing off a roof onto a ladder I've found that the ladder needs to
extend at least 6 rungs above the point where your feet leave the roof.
You need something to grab onto with your hands when making the first
step. When I have done this in the past I've tied the ladder off at the
top with rope into two heavy duty eyelets that I've screwed into the
brick and made sure that the bottom doesn't move by wedging it in place
with 2 x 25kg bags of sand/ballast.

In fact I have got plenty of full ladders home
from garage sales that way with the back
door left open. Not ideal when going far tho.


I have a very heavy aluminium double extending long ladder that I
inherited 30+ years ago. It has heavy solid "I" section sides. I regard
it as a two man job to put up or take down as it is so heavy and hence
little used in favour of the smaller much lighter weight double
extending aluminium ladder which I also own.


I only wear elastic sided boots and avoid steel capped boots.


I've found that safety shoes with steel toe caps and sole plates are
very comfortable. I need a shoe with a wide fitting and these shoes tend
to be wide fitting. I buy one (UK) shoe size above my normal shoe
size[1] and wear thicker work socks if necessary. I tend to wear safety
shoes/boots every time I do any DIY as with a steel toe cap you have the
option of precision positioning something by kicking it without hurting
your foot


[1] I'm sure that shoes have got smaller over the years or that the size
only relates to toe to heal dimension and ignores the width which
fashion has dictated has become very narrow.


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alan_m wrote
Rod Speed wrote


I'm not all that keen on getting off the ladder onto the
roof and back down again after I have done the gutters
and have been considering making a full fixed sort of
combination stairs and ladder with proper side rails to
use instead now that I am older but have never got
around to doing that.


If climbing off a roof onto a ladder I've found that the ladder needs to
extend at least 6 rungs above the point where your feet leave the roof.


I dont go quite that far, normally only about 3-4 rungs above the roof.

Not so bad getting off the ladder, I'm more uncomfortable
with managing to not put my foot on the top rung below
the roof line reliably with no risk of coming off in the process.

And since I'm always doing it alone, with no one holding the ladder,
with the latter just resting on the barge board, its not all that secure.

You need something to grab onto with your hands when making the first
step.


Yep.

When I have done this in the past I've tied the ladder off at the top with
rope into two heavy duty eyelets that I've screwed into the brick


Not feasible in my case, its a 6' eave that lets the sun right
into the passive solar huge array of patio doors on the N
side of the house in winter, but no sun inside in the summer.

Not even feasible to put clamps on the bargeboard given
that the sheet metal gutter is on the other side of that and
there is a gap of 1" between the inside of the bargeboard
and the sheet metal gutter due to the vertical angle iron
thats welded to the galvanised roof beams which has the
oregon bargeboard bolted to it with gutter bolts.

and made sure that the bottom doesn't move by wedging it in place with 2 x
25kg bags of sand/ballast.


Mine is soft soil and the bottom of the side rails of the
sliding extension ladder dig into that half an inch or so.

In fact I have got plenty of full ladders home
from garage sales that way with the back
door left open. Not ideal when going far tho.


I have a very heavy aluminium double extending long ladder that I
inherited 30+ years ago. It has heavy solid "I" section sides.


I bought mine when building the house, aluminium oval sides
that the rungs are swaged into, open on the inner side. Each
section is about 9' long.

I regard it as a two man job to put up or take down as it is so heavy and
hence little used in favour of the smaller much lighter weight double
extending aluminium ladder which I also own.


I only wear elastic sided boots and avoid steel capped boots.


I've found that safety shoes with steel toe caps and sole plates are very
comfortable.


I wear mine when walking for miles for
exercise so they wouldnt work for that.

I stand for long on a ladder so rarely that it
doesnt warrant a special pair for use on ladders.

I need a shoe with a wide fitting and these shoes tend to be wide fitting.
I buy one (UK) shoe size above my normal shoe size[1] and wear thicker
work socks if necessary. I tend to wear safety shoes/boots every time I do
any DIY as with a steel toe cap you have the option of precision
positioning something by kicking it without hurting your foot


I kick fine with mine. Just the one time something did end up
on the toecap and collapsed it, but just a nuisance, no toe injury.

[1] I'm sure that shoes have got smaller over the years or that the size
only relates to toe to heal dimension and ignores the width which fashion
has dictated has become very narrow.


I find I have to try boots when buying, I normally
take out size 7 but sometimes need an 8. Just got
some from Aldi and 7 was hopeless. 8 is still tighter
than I prefer but the buggers never had any 9s.

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On 18/09/2017 06:38, Rod Speed wrote:

I've found that safety shoes with steel toe caps and sole plates are
very comfortable.


I wear mine when walking for miles for
exercise so they wouldnt work for that.


I wear mine for long walks with a dog when the conditions don't warrant
Wellington boots. Very comfortable.


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alan_m wrote
Rod Speed wrote


I've found that safety shoes with steel toe caps and sole plates are
very comfortable.


I wear mine when walking for miles for
exercise so they wouldnt work for that.


I wear mine for long walks with a dog when the conditions don't warrant
Wellington boots. Very comfortable.


I wouldnt find that with sole plates.

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On Monday, 18 September 2017 04:08:23 UTC+1, alan_m wrote:
[1] I'm sure that shoes have got smaller over the years or that the size
only relates to toe to heal dimension and ignores the width which
fashion has dictated has become very narrow.


I find the opposite problem - wide fit shoes are readily available but not narrow ones.

Owain

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alan_m brought next idea :
[1] I'm sure that shoes have got smaller over the years or that the size only
relates to toe to heal dimension and ignores the width which fashion has
dictated has become very narrow.


Maybe a bit of both...

As a young man, I wore a size 7, now I wear a size 9. I am aware my
feet have expanded width wise.
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