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Andrew
 
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Default Building an Extension (Preparation Stage)

Dear All

I have posted questions before and had many good answers, also I hope I
have managed to help a few people with some answer of my own.
My latest problem is big though, and I expect will take many years to
complete.
Basically I plan to build an L shaped building round the back and one
side of my house.

One part of the L shape will be for non-living accommodation. It will in
fact go where many people have built garages.

The main part of the building will be right across the back of the house
and other part of the L shape, and will be used for living in.

I know I cannot expect every answer; I need to complete this building
from this newsgroup now (however help and interest from other will be
much appreciated as this project moves forward). What I am looking for
are reference points. Can any one name a good book for building
extensions to homes (in the UK) for the self builder/architect as I
intend to do all the work my self. Looked at quite a few books but none
of them seem to cover every thing. To be honest the building regulations
have proved most helpful so far.

Any other locations for information would be appreciated to for example
newsgroups specifically for self-builders or good websites.

I know I have a lot to think about and do. Before I really get started I
can already think of the following

Planning permissions

Building over drains which run the entire length of the street about 3-4
feet from the back door, so re re-routing the drains is not an option.

Definition of buildings. I know their are strict regulation for the
living quarters, and I intend to follow all regulations and add where I
think is appropriate. The section I have referred to as non-living
quarters, I am looking for the best definition for, as I know the
building regs are different for garages. What I would ideally like for
this section is a garage style build, but with out the extra fire
precautions, as I donít wonít be able to park a car in the new building
as it will be too narrow. In this section of the building I could like
to maximise space and security, with the option of putting a combi
boiler in when the building is complete.


There are many many more considerations to consider as well

Finally has any one attempted something like this before, and had any
helpful experiences? Please donít just reply with hire and architect and
builder with out some very very good reasons. I believe if I take this
project one step at a time and the length of time to complete this
project is not an issue then I can do this.

Many Thanks

Andrew

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Hugo Nebula
 
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Default Building an Extension (Preparation Stage)

On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 10:56:08 +0000, a particular chimpanzee named
Andrew randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

Building over drains which run the entire length of the street about 3-4
feet from the back door, so re re-routing the drains is not an option.


If the houses were built before 1937, then the drain is deemed to be a
'public' sewer. If it's post 1937 it could also be a public sewer if
it has been adopted. Building over a public sewer as opposed to a
private sewer will require the permission of the local sewerage
undertaker usually your local Water Company. If it's not public, then
building over will be covered by the Building Regulations. Ask at
your Building Control section or your Water Co to see the sewer map
for your street.

IMHO depending on the diameter you may be able to build over the
public sewer. Anything over 150mm diameter, and the Water Co usually
want it diverted.

Definition of buildings. I know their are strict regulation for the
living quarters, and I intend to follow all regulations and add where I
think is appropriate. The section I have referred to as non-living
quarters, I am looking for the best definition for, as I know the
building regs are different for garages. What I would ideally like for
this section is a garage style build, but with out the extra fire
precautions, as I donít wonít be able to park a car in the new building
as it will be too narrow. In this section of the building I could like
to maximise space and security, with the option of putting a combi
boiler in when the building is complete.


A 'building' is a structure with a roof on. Any building that is
attached to a dwelling, no matter what size and what it's used for,
requires a Building Regulations application (with the exception of a
porch or a conservatory). A 'garage' or storeroom would require an
application. The Building Regulations are the same, but how you meet
the requirements differ (a subtle but important distinction). Let me
explain:

Matters like the structure, combustion appliances, safety glazing, etc
will be the same, as these are not affected by how the building is
used. Some matters do not impose any requirements because they do not
adversely affect anyone's health & safety (such as providing
damp-proofing) or because it's not reasonable to do so (if the space
is unheated, then insulation is not required and ventilation to
prevent the build-up of condensation is not necessary). The only
requirement that would be more onerous would be fire safety, in
particular forming a compartment wall between the two buildings. This
would require that any door between the dwelling and the 'garage' be a
fire door, and any other openings greater than a 40mm diameter pipe be
blocked up or otherwise fire-protected. This would apply whether the
building is a garage or a store, as the main risk to the dwelling is
of a fire going undetected for longer, and the quantity of combustible
material in a store is usually greater than in a dwelling.
--
Hugo Nebula
"The fact that no-one on the internet wants a piece of this
shows you just how far you've strayed from the pack".
  #3   Report Post  
Andrew
 
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Default Building an Extension (Preparation Stage)

Hugo

Thank you for your help

My property is in fact a 1960s property and the drain passing the row of
houses is a private drain, So I assume that if I following the building
regulations this would mean bridging the drain with a lintel.

ON the garage/storeroom front I assume you are saying that I can build a
single skinned building with no insulation, but with fire doors where
the storeroom joins the house. There are currently two holes larger that
40 mm, which will need rerouting, I was thinking of through the roof of
the new building (with the appropriate fire protection). One is the vent
from the extractor for the cooker; the other is simply an air vent in
the existing wall (being used to extract heat from the back of the
fridge (as per manufactures recommendations).

Andrew


Hugo Nebula wrote:

On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 10:56:08 +0000, a particular chimpanzee named
Andrew randomly hit the keyboard and produced:


Building over drains which run the entire length of the street about 3-4
feet from the back door, so re re-routing the drains is not an option.



If the houses were built before 1937, then the drain is deemed to be a
'public' sewer. If it's post 1937 it could also be a public sewer if
it has been adopted. Building over a public sewer as opposed to a
private sewer will require the permission of the local sewerage
undertaker usually your local Water Company. If it's not public, then
building over will be covered by the Building Regulations. Ask at
your Building Control section or your Water Co to see the sewer map
for your street.

IMHO depending on the diameter you may be able to build over the
public sewer. Anything over 150mm diameter, and the Water Co usually
want it diverted.


Definition of buildings. I know their are strict regulation for the
living quarters, and I intend to follow all regulations and add where I
think is appropriate. The section I have referred to as non-living
quarters, I am looking for the best definition for, as I know the
building regs are different for garages. What I would ideally like for
this section is a garage style build, but with out the extra fire
precautions, as I donít wonít be able to park a car in the new building
as it will be too narrow. In this section of the building I could like
to maximise space and security, with the option of putting a combi
boiler in when the building is complete.



A 'building' is a structure with a roof on. Any building that is
attached to a dwelling, no matter what size and what it's used for,
requires a Building Regulations application (with the exception of a
porch or a conservatory). A 'garage' or storeroom would require an
application. The Building Regulations are the same, but how you meet
the requirements differ (a subtle but important distinction). Let me
explain:

Matters like the structure, combustion appliances, safety glazing, etc
will be the same, as these are not affected by how the building is
used. Some matters do not impose any requirements because they do not
adversely affect anyone's health & safety (such as providing
damp-proofing) or because it's not reasonable to do so (if the space
is unheated, then insulation is not required and ventilation to
prevent the build-up of condensation is not necessary). The only
requirement that would be more onerous would be fire safety, in
particular forming a compartment wall between the two buildings. This
would require that any door between the dwelling and the 'garage' be a
fire door, and any other openings greater than a 40mm diameter pipe be
blocked up or otherwise fire-protected. This would apply whether the
building is a garage or a store, as the main risk to the dwelling is
of a fire going undetected for longer, and the quantity of combustible
material in a store is usually greater than in a dwelling.


--
To reply via email, first reverse the address below then replace the
(at) with @ and the (dot) with .
moc(tod)xepip(tod)lsd(ta)spuorgswen_werdna

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Nick Finnigan
 
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Default Building an Extension (Preparation Stage)

"Hugo Nebula" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 10:56:08 +0000, a particular chimpanzee named
Andrew randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

Building over drains which run the entire length of the street about 3-4
feet from the back door, so re re-routing the drains is not an option.


If the houses were built before 1937, then the drain is deemed to be a
'public' sewer.


Where does such a drain start to be a 'public' sewer -
is it the entire length, or downstream of the first junction?


  #5   Report Post  
Set Square
 
Posts: n/a
Default Building an Extension (Preparation Stage)

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Nick Finnigan wrote:

"Hugo Nebula" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 10:56:08 +0000, a particular chimpanzee named
Andrew randomly hit the keyboard and
produced:

Building over drains which run the entire length of the street
about 3-4 feet from the back door, so re re-routing the drains is
not an option.


If the houses were built before 1937, then the drain is deemed to be
a 'public' sewer.


Where does such a drain start to be a 'public' sewer -
is it the entire length, or downstream of the first junction?



AIUI, it has to serve two or more properties to be deemed a public sewer.
This suggests that it becomes "public" where the first 2 private spurs join.
--
Cheers,
Set Square
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!




  #6   Report Post  
Andrew
 
Posts: n/a
Default Building an Extension (Preparation Stage)

I'm not sure is that is always true.

I'm sure the one in my garden is private and it serves more than two
properties. I think mine becomes public when it joins the main one in
the street.

Set Square wrote:
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Nick Finnigan wrote:


"Hugo Nebula" wrote in message
. ..

On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 10:56:08 +0000, a particular chimpanzee named
Andrew randomly hit the keyboard and
produced:


Building over drains which run the entire length of the street
about 3-4 feet from the back door, so re re-routing the drains is
not an option.

If the houses were built before 1937, then the drain is deemed to be
a 'public' sewer.


Where does such a drain start to be a 'public' sewer -
is it the entire length, or downstream of the first junction?




AIUI, it has to serve two or more properties to be deemed a public sewer.
This suggests that it becomes "public" where the first 2 private spurs join.


--
To reply via email, first reverse the address below then replace the
(at) with @ and the (dot) with .
moc(tod)xepip(tod)lsd(ta)spuorgswen_werdna

  #7   Report Post  
Niall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Building an Extension (Preparation Stage)

On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 15:00:04 -0000, "Set Square"
wrote:





AIUI, it has to serve two or more properties to be deemed a public sewer.
This suggests that it becomes "public" where the first 2 private spurs join.


This is more or less the Scottish situation (tenement properties are
different) but AFAIK England is more complicated.

--
Niall
  #8   Report Post  
Niall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Building an Extension (Preparation Stage)

On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 23:35:33 +0000, Niall
wrote:

On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 15:00:04 -0000, "Set Square"
wrote:





AIUI, it has to serve two or more properties to be deemed a public sewer.
This suggests that it becomes "public" where the first 2 private spurs join.


This is more or less the Scottish situation (tenement properties are
different) but AFAIK England is more complicated.


Following up to owm post, forgot that in Scotland it becomes public
when it leaves your property even if only serving your property.

--
Niall
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