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Default Oak finishing

Hi I have built some oak kitchen cabinets and am trying to finish the
doors, the problem I seem to be having is keeping the wood as light as
possible , I have tried Linseed oil , danish oil and finishing oil but
they all darken the wood too much . I appreciate that any oil will
darken the wood and I am trying to avoid a water based product, I have
also tried sanding sealer and shellac white knotting .
Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
and highlight the grain ?

many thanks in advance

Paul

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Default Oak finishing


"paul" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi I have built some oak kitchen cabinets and am trying to finish the
doors, the problem I seem to be having is keeping the wood as light as
possible , I have tried Linseed oil , danish oil and finishing oil but
they all darken the wood too much . I appreciate that any oil will
darken the wood and I am trying to avoid a water based product, I have
also tried sanding sealer and shellac white knotting .
Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
and highlight the grain ?

many thanks in advance

Paul


What about neutral wax?

Andy.


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Default Oak finishing

paul wrote:
..
Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
and highlight the grain ?


The two are almost incompatible.

The lightest covering I have found is a matte acrylic varnish like
Ronseal clear etc etc.


But it does bugger all to develop the grain.

You best bet is to get some scrap pieces and try a few wipes with the
lighter Colron wood stains..with luck a clean up with acetone will lift
it mostly off the hard wood and leave it in the porous rings. Then use a
clear acrylic.



many thanks in advance

Paul

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Default Oak finishing


"paul" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi I have built some oak kitchen cabinets and am trying to finish the
doors, the problem I seem to be having is keeping the wood as light as
possible , I have tried Linseed oil , danish oil and finishing oil but
they all darken the wood too much . I appreciate that any oil will
darken the wood and I am trying to avoid a water based product, I have
also tried sanding sealer and shellac white knotting .
Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
and highlight the grain ?

many thanks in advance

Paul


Wax them with opague polish or beeswax.


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Default Oak finishing

paul wrote:

Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
and highlight the grain ?


Using beech or maple instead of oak.

Finish it with wax over oil. I'd suggest Liberon's off-the-shelf blend
of both - the "Neutral" wax is lighter than the "Clear" and their tung
oil blends won't yellow in 6 months like linseed will. Of course you'll
get some darkening, but no more than anything else. There are sprayed
water-based lacquers that are lighter, but it's really not worth
chasing it.

Oak just isn't a pale timber, especially not when it ages. Don't use
oak if you don't want it oak coloured.



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Default Oak finishing

On 16 Jan 2007 14:22:02 -0800, "paul" wrote:

|Hi I have built some oak kitchen cabinets and am trying to finish the
|doors, the problem I seem to be having is keeping the wood as light as
|possible , I have tried Linseed oil , danish oil and finishing oil but
|they all darken the wood too much . I appreciate that any oil will
|darken the wood and I am trying to avoid a water based product, I have
|also tried sanding sealer and shellac white knotting .
|Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
|and highlight the grain ?

French polish? http://www.ehow.com/how_14586_apply-basic-french.html Takes
forever but looks fabulous when done. The kits mentioned are not
necessary.
--
Dave Fawthrop dave hyphenologist co uk Google Groups is IME the *worst*
method of accessing usenet. GG subscribers would be well advised get a
newsreader, say Agent, and a newsserver, say news.individual.net. These
will allow them: to see only *new* posts, a killfile, and other goodies.
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Default Oak finishing

On 16 Jan 2007 14:22:02 -0800, "paul" wrote:

Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
and highlight the grain ?


"Limed oak" -- a finish in which a paste of lime (or chalk?) and wax is applied
liberally, and then everything but the stuff in the pores is taken off with a
scrubber.

A bit unusual, and not to everyone's taste, but highlights the grain and is
light!


Thomas Prufer
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Default Oak finishing

Thomas Prufer wrote:
On 16 Jan 2007 14:22:02 -0800, "paul" wrote:

Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
and highlight the grain ?


"Limed oak" -- a finish in which a paste of lime (or chalk?) and wax is applied
liberally, and then everything but the stuff in the pores is taken off with a
scrubber.

A bit unusual, and not to everyone's taste, but highlights the grain and is
light!


Thomas Prufer


Oak tends to "darken" whatever you put on it. Even if you just wipe it
with white spirit, it changes the appearance because light reflects off
it in a different way. That said, a lot of "clear" finishes aren't clear
at all. If you want transparency, the Rustins 2 part finishes are pretty
good but IMO they highlight the grain a little too much.
What most people want is a mellow, natural look that is also hard
wearing, and for that you have to consider lightening the wood itself.
2 part wood bleaches work well on oak but, as peroxide is the main
ingredient, maybe they've been banned.
How thick can a terrorist get, buying gallons of 1% strength from a
hairdressing wholesaler?
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Default Oak finishing


Stuart Noble wrote:
Thomas Prufer wrote:
On 16 Jan 2007 14:22:02 -0800, "paul" wrote:

Is there a product or method which will keep the wood as light as poss
and highlight the grain ?


"Limed oak" -- a finish in which a paste of lime (or chalk?) and wax is applied
liberally, and then everything but the stuff in the pores is taken off with a
scrubber.

A bit unusual, and not to everyone's taste, but highlights the grain and is
light!


Thomas Prufer


Oak tends to "darken" whatever you put on it. Even if you just wipe it
with white spirit, it changes the appearance because light reflects off
it in a different way. That said, a lot of "clear" finishes aren't clear
at all. If you want transparency, the Rustins 2 part finishes are pretty
good but IMO they highlight the grain a little too much.
What most people want is a mellow, natural look that is also hard
wearing, and for that you have to consider lightening the wood itself.
2 part wood bleaches work well on oak but, as peroxide is the main
ingredient, maybe they've been banned.
How thick can a terrorist get, buying gallons of 1% strength from a
hairdressing wholesaler?



Thanks for so many replies, the problem with a wax finish is steam will
bloom the wax white , acylics do nothing to enhance the grain , I
have tried a sort of limed wash by applying sanding sealer and a
diluted wash wipped off , this tonned down quite well but when I oiled
or varnished over the wood looked quite flat, I have thought about an
oxcilic acid wash but for the moment I think I will try a drop of
undercoat in some oil finishes ,I have had oak floors and bits of
furniture before , the problem here is the cabinets are untreated and
have been in place for awhile and when I oiled a couple of doors they
seemed very dark and in your face !

thanks for replies Paul

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