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Jon
 
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Default Removing then screwing in gas oven

Hi,

To do some work in my kitchen, I'm considering unsrewing my gas cooker,
removing it from the kitchen to clear some space to work in, then
screwing it back in again. It's a bayonet fitting IIRC - do I need to
get a CORGI plumber to a) unscrew it and b) screw it back in again? Or
can I do this myself?

I guess plan b is just to leave it in place and work around it...

Thanks,

Jon

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Jon
 
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Thanks for the advice - yeah, from what I remember this is v simple to
do (using a light bulb-type fitting on cooker was a remarkably
sensible idea). Being as I'm not changing the cooker, cooker location
or anything like that - apart from raising it about 1cm higher by
putting a new floor under it - I take it there's no complicating
factors to bear in mind?

Also, I know there were regulations put in about this in '98 and was
wanting to check there wasn't a legal requirement to pay a
CORGI-registered plumber 50 quid to screw in the cooker Wouldn't
want to go against regulations...and if you are meant to do this I
could do the work I wanted in the kitchen by just pulling the cooker
out a bit but leaving it screwed in...

Cheers,

Jon

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Lobster
 
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Geoffrey wrote:
On 4 Apr 2005 05:26:17 -0700, "Jon" wrote:


To do some work in my kitchen, I'm considering unsrewing my gas cooker,
removing it from the kitchen to clear some space to work in, then
screwing it back in again. It's a bayonet fitting IIRC - do I need to
get a CORGI plumber to a) unscrew it and b) screw it back in again? Or
can I do this myself?


It's just like removing and replacing a light bulb! Do it yourself.


Hang on - is the OP talking about *unscrewing* the whole bayonet
fitting, or uncoupling the male and female fittings? I read the
former, which is not on unless he's 'competent' to work with gas...

David
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Jon
 
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Lobster,

Sorry if the original post wasn't clear - I just meant detaching the
male and female fittings as you would when removing then replacing a
bayonet lightbulb (I've got the habit of talking about 'unscrewing'
bayonet lightbulbs for some reason, and it obviously carried across to
my writing about cookers ). I just want to detach the cooker from
the pipe/wall - I've no desire to move where the actual fitting is or
anything like that.

If I just just want to uncouple the male and female fittings, am I
meant to get a CORGI plumber to do this or is it legal to do so myself?

Cheers,

Jon

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Stuart
 
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On 4 Apr 2005 07:11:55 -0700, "Jon" wrote:

Lobster,

Sorry if the original post wasn't clear - I just meant detaching the
male and female fittings as you would when removing then replacing a
bayonet lightbulb (I've got the habit of talking about 'unscrewing'
bayonet lightbulbs for some reason, and it obviously carried across to
my writing about cookers ). I just want to detach the cooker from
the pipe/wall - I've no desire to move where the actual fitting is or
anything like that.

If I just just want to uncouple the male and female fittings, am I
meant to get a CORGI plumber to do this or is it legal to do so myself?

Cheers,

Jon


Just do it yourself ..Thats what these fittings were made for ..If u
havent done it before ( as I suspect) then be prepared for it being
tight ..Hold the female fitting firmly while turning the male part and
when refitting push firmly .Also cover up the fittings while apart to
avoid dirt getting in .


Stuart






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Jon
 
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Cheers - will cover the fittings while apart to keep the dirt out (will
be generating some dirt through work done in the kitchen, so that's
definitely a good idea). Any other issues to bear in mind? Or aside
from that is it straightforward?

Jon

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Stuart
 
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On 4 Apr 2005 08:42:07 -0700, "Jon" wrote:

Cheers - will cover the fittings while apart to keep the dirt out (will
be generating some dirt through work done in the kitchen, so that's
definitely a good idea). Any other issues to bear in mind? Or aside
from that is it straightforward?

Jon


It's quite a straightforward procedure
Stuart






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Ed Sirett
 
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On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 06:46:42 -0700, Jon wrote:

Thanks for the advice - yeah, from what I remember this is v simple to
do (using a light bulb-type fitting on cooker was a remarkably
sensible idea). Being as I'm not changing the cooker, cooker location
or anything like that - apart from raising it about 1cm higher by
putting a new floor under it - I take it there's no complicating
factors to bear in mind?

Also, I know there were regulations put in about this in '98 and was
wanting to check there wasn't a legal requirement to pay a
CORGI-registered plumber 50 quid to screw in the cooker Wouldn't
want to go against regulations...and if you are meant to do this I
could do the work I wanted in the kitchen by just pulling the cooker
out a bit but leaving it screwed in...



The bayonet is (bloody well ought to be) self sealing. The open end faces
downward (well it ought to) so that dirt does not get in easily.

There is a significant difference between (dis)connecting a cooker which
is already installed (a user activity) and installing/replacing a cooker.

The law defines certain activities as "Gas Work" and these have to be done
by competent people. For this reason new cookers are not sold with hoses
these are supplied by the installer. There is quite a bit more to do than
simply screwing the hose in to the cooker and pushing the appliance into
place.

HTH

--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
Gas fitting FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
Sealed CH FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/SealedCH.html


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Jon
 
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Cheers. So just disconnecting a cooker that's already there, then
reconnecting it later, is not 'gas work' (and is therefore a user
activity)?

Anyway, I've looked behind the cooker now and it is a bayonet fitting;
the open end faces horizontally (so I will be sure to cover it to avoid
dirt...) but aside from that looks fine...

Jon

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Rick
 
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From the title I thought you wanted to go one better then the "stick
head in a gas oven", and perform some accrobatics with your partner in
an oxyegen free environment ........


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Ian Stirling
 
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Jon wrote:
Cheers. So just disconnecting a cooker that's already there, then
reconnecting it later, is not 'gas work' (and is therefore a user
activity)?


I believe that it is as much 'gas work' as is soldering on a new copper
spur.
Neither requires any paperwork, if you are doing the work yourself.

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Stuart
 
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On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 18:50:55 GMT, Rick wrote:

From the title I thought you wanted to go one better then the "stick
head in a gas oven", and perform some accrobatics with your partner in
an oxyegen free environment ........


Just make sure it has cooled down ...lol
Stuart






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Jon
 
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So if this classes as 'gas work' the issue's just whether I (or the
slightly more knowledgable mate who's helping me out) am competant to
do the work then?

"From the title I thought you wanted to go one better then the "stick
head in a gas oven", and perform some accrobatics with your partner in
an oxyegen free environment ........ "
Now that would be a difficult piece of DIY Must be spending too
long reading about defense spending - the innuendo's starting to wear
off...Someone must have been laughing when they decided to call a
missile a 'penaid'....

Jon

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John
 
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"Jon" wrote in message
ups.com...
Cheers - will cover the fittings while apart to keep the dirt out (will
be generating some dirt through work done in the kitchen, so that's
definitely a good idea). Any other issues to bear in mind? Or aside
from that is it straightforward?

Jon

Apply a sparing wipe of silicone grease such as gas tap grease to the male
spigot when you push it back in as this will ease things a lot and save
damage to the sealing ring within the socket


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John Stumbles
 
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Jon wrote:
Thanks for the advice - yeah, from what I remember this is v simple to
do (using a light bulb-type fitting on cooker was a remarkably
sensible idea). Being as I'm not changing the cooker, cooker location
or anything like that - apart from raising it about 1cm higher by
putting a new floor under it - I take it there's no complicating
factors to bear in mind?


Only if there's a stability bracket (like 2 L-shaped metal brackets
fixed together) fixed to the wall or floor at the back of the cooker:
after raising the floor you need to make sure that this bracket still
engages in the corresponding slot in the back of the cooker so that it
prevents the cooker being tipped forward if you (or a child) were for
instance to put your weight on the oven door when it's open.

If you don't have this sort of bracket you should have a chain fixed to
the back of the cooker (at worktop height) hooking over a corresponding
hook fixed to the wall.

If you don't have either you should fit one to comply with the gas regs.
It would be heresy to question this.


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Jon
 
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Cheers. Will bear all that in mind.

Jon

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