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Default 18 volt battery in 12 volt drill?

I've run a 14 volt drill with a 12 volt battery....has anyone
run an 12 volt dewalt drill with an 18 volt battery....I have
two 12 volt drills but would like to use the more powerful batteries.
Thanks

Paul

  #3   Report Post  
Stormin Mormon
 
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Some tool makers use different contact configurations, so that you can't
over volt a drill. 18 volts in a 12V drill is a bit too much. I wouldn't.

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


wrote in message
oups.com...
I've run a 14 volt drill with a 12 volt battery....has anyone
run an 12 volt dewalt drill with an 18 volt battery....I have
two 12 volt drills but would like to use the more powerful batteries.
Thanks

Paul


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Rich
 
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wrote in message
oups.com...
I've run a 14 volt drill with a 12 volt battery....has anyone
run an 12 volt dewalt drill with an 18 volt battery....I have
two 12 volt drills but would like to use the more powerful batteries.
Thanks

Paul

Most likely there would be no problem. The limiting factor is the size of
wire their used in the motor. I devised a way to use four batteries for an
old two battery screwdriver. Worked wonderfully.


  #5   Report Post  
Professor
 
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Right. I've run double and triple the rated voltage on DC drills. I've
abused them terribly and almost never burn up a motor because of it.
If you check the motor manufacturer's specs you will see that the
motors are rated for quite a range of voltages. If you have a source of
donor parts or the drill in mind is expendable, then have fun and go
for it. Custom made tools are great.



  #6   Report Post  
m Ransley
 
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The motor may handle it but you have electronics and gearing to
consider, it seems everyday products get cheaper, so do the internals.

  #8   Report Post  
Matt
 
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I have found the batteries to be too inconvienient to use, regardless
of the voltage. So, I went out and bought a new Dewalt and wired it
directly to the 120v house current. I also built an adaptor for it so
that it runs on 240 for those really tough jobs.

  #9   Report Post  
m Ransley
 
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Matt get a transformer 480v works best.

  #10   Report Post  
Matt
 
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Hey! I never thought of that. Will do!!!!!



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Rich
 
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"m Ransley" wrote in message
...
The motor may handle it but you have electronics and gearing to
consider, it seems everyday products get cheaper, so do the internals.


I doubt that for those voltage (6 to 18 volt) the electronics should not be
a problem. The motors and electronics may well be the same for all units
from a given manufacturer. And the electronics doesn't amount to much of
anything anyway. Not even as involved as variable speed AC motor drives.


  #12   Report Post  
Professor
 
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Matt wrote:
Hey! I never thought of that. Will do!!!!!


Folks, Matt and Ransley here just might be dumb enough to plug therir
DC drill into the AC socket or an AC transformer, but trust me it will
blow your circuit breaker very fast. Sometimes it will blow so fast
that the drill will survive it.
You can use an AC step down transformer that will put out 10 amps or
more, but that's expensive unless you already own one. A DC drill
operated in this fashion has no where near the power (watts) of a low
cost AC drill with a cord. There are ways to beef up your DC drill.
However, don't listen to these fools. They have not done anything
themselves.

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m Ransley
 
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The electronics amount to everything if they blow.

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m Ransley
 
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WHAT you mean my 3.6v B&D cant take 440 AC so far it works great ! Gee
Ive got 3, 220 - 110 transformers from Europe and I was just going to
inline one more for 880v AC. Aw I gonna try it anyway an 880v ac B&D
Kick ass.

Howabout an 880v coffemaker , makes a pot in 6 seconds flat. And my
slow ceiling fan, yep 440 just might do it there also.

  #15   Report Post  
Rich
 
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"m Ransley" wrote in message
...
The electronics amount to everything if they blow.


I just checked a 12 volt typical drill. The "electronics" consistes of a
switch and an RFP50N05 (50 Ampere, 50 volt, .022 Ohm, N-Channel Power
MOSFET). So it will work with anything up to 50 volts and 50 Amperes.

So if you want to go to a larger battery and are still worried about blowing
something open it up and take at look at what is used inside. Wonder
where I can get a 40 volt battery to put on it???




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m Ransley
 
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The key is the 50 amp rating. My RC car 7cell - 8.4v needs a 30 amp
fuse it blows 20amp. Nicads can dump alot of power. And for a drill
you dont want to get near its rating you just shorten its life.

  #17   Report Post  
Matt
 
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I agree. Folks, don't listen to this 'professor' guy - the only thing
he can safely profess is that he is a dip****. EVERYONE knows that
there is no real difference between AC and DC - that whole thing was a
conspiracy to defraud the public. Your power tools, coffee makers, TVs
, stereos, ALL OF IT - will run longer, faster, and better on 880v +.

  #18   Report Post  
Stormin Mormon
 
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Well, if you get a dewalt cordless drill, and then build an adaptor for it,
to run on house power. Havn't you just reinvented the electric plug in
drill?

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


"Matt" wrote in message
ups.com...
I have found the batteries to be too inconvienient to use, regardless
of the voltage. So, I went out and bought a new Dewalt and wired it
directly to the 120v house current. I also built an adaptor for it so
that it runs on 240 for those really tough jobs.


  #19   Report Post  
Matt
 
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Yes, only better. Nobody ever had a 240v cordless corded portable drill
before.

  #20   Report Post  
m Ransley
 
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Im tired of electric, im putting in my RC cars 35000rpm nitromethane gas
motor and clutch in my drill, now thats power to screw.



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Pop
 
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Rich wrote:
Most likely there would be no problem. The limiting factor is
the
size of wire their used in the motor. I devised a way to use
four
batteries for an old two battery screwdriver. Worked
wonderfully.


I bet. I'll also bet you didn't use ballasts to balance the
batteries, and their life was awfully short, but then it
"worked", right?

  #23   Report Post  
Pop
 
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m Ransley wrote:
The electronics amount to everything if they blow.


You got that right. And since engineers design to limits, it's
pretty UNlikely a 12V unit has 18V components. Nine to 12 maybe,
but not 18. These guys must be loved by the battery and
replacement parts shops, or they use their equipment a few
seconds at a time once or twice a year.
Then, even IF the components can live thru 18V vice 12, it's a
pretty sure thing the motor/stator windings weren't designed to
dissipate that much heat. Sooner or later one of these guys will
set the drill down after a prolonged session, the core temp will
work its way out thru the windings, and drip possibly flaming
plastic or winding cement onto the bench, and start a fire with
it, and then blame the manufacturer for their house burning down.
Way too many people think batteries are "safe" and that they
never heat up. The best part is the failure of a 12V while it's
on an 18V charger; it's usually a pretty site, at first. When a
battery core's max temp is exceeded, it almost always explodes or
vents with great gusto, especially the types used in power tools.
If you want to see a really pretty site, try a lead-acid on a
bigger charger; it's prettier yet, all that carbon to burn off.
Watch someone come back and say those batteries can't vent
'cause they have no vents g.

Don't drink & drill.

Pop


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Pop
 
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Rich wrote:
"m Ransley" wrote in message
...
The electronics amount to everything if they blow.


I just checked a 12 volt typical drill. The "electronics"
consistes
of a switch and an RFP50N05 (50 Ampere, 50 volt, .022 Ohm,
N-Channel
Power MOSFET). So it will work with anything up to 50 volts
and 50
Amperes.


LOL! That's ALL that has to dissipate any power? Whooooo,
woooo! Great discovery, Tim!

Now tell me this: what is the maximum core temp rating for any
of the windings? Or the commutator max current? These guyys
need to go do some research. Badly!


  #25   Report Post  
Pop
 
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m Ransley wrote:
WHAT you mean my 3.6v B&D cant take 440 AC so far it works
great !
Gee Ive got 3, 220 - 110 transformers from Europe and I was
just
going to inline one more for 880v AC. Aw I gonna try it
anyway an
880v ac B&D Kick ass.

Howabout an 880v coffemaker , makes a pot in 6 seconds flat.
And my
slow ceiling fan, yep 440 just might do it there also.


LOL!!!! Your tongue must be danged near sticking out thru your
cheek by now! Hey, I got an old 10,000V oil burner xfmr; yeah!
Let's try that one Tim!




  #26   Report Post  
Pop
 
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Matt wrote:
I agree. Folks, don't listen to this 'professor' guy - the only
thing
he can safely profess is that he is a dip****. EVERYONE knows
that
there is no real difference between AC and DC - that whole
thing was a
conspiracy to defraud the public. Your power tools, coffee
makers, TVs
, stereos, ALL OF IT - will run longer, faster, and better on
880v +.


Should be really stupendous on my 10kV xfmr then, eh? No, wait!
I got a big, OLD, color TV out in the shed; what's that, 22kV?
Hey, I'll have all you guys beat! I'll post back when I git it
woikin'.


  #27   Report Post  
Pop
 
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Matt wrote:
Yes, only better. Nobody ever had a 240v cordless corded
portable
drill before.


Oh yeah: They're called stationary 240V cordless corded
mini-portable drills!


  #28   Report Post  
Pop
 
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m Ransley wrote:
Im tired of electric, im putting in my RC cars 35000rpm
nitromethane
gas motor and clutch in my drill, now thats power to screw.


Been a long time since I"ve had this much fun just TALKING about
screwin'!

Well, gotta go look for that xfmr now. Hmm, think I had a
conductformer somewhere, now where did I put that?

/pop

  #30   Report Post  
TCS
 
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On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 19:24:28 -0500, Pop wrote:
m Ransley wrote:
WHAT you mean my 3.6v B&D cant take 440 AC so far it works
great !
Gee Ive got 3, 220 - 110 transformers from Europe and I was
just
going to inline one more for 880v AC. Aw I gonna try it
anyway an
880v ac B&D Kick ass.

Howabout an 880v coffemaker , makes a pot in 6 seconds flat.
And my
slow ceiling fan, yep 440 just might do it there also.


LOL!!!! Your tongue must be danged near sticking out thru your
cheek by now! Hey, I got an old 10,000V oil burner xfmr; yeah!
Let's try that one Tim!



I put instant coffee in the microwave oven and went back in time.
-- S.Wright


  #31   Report Post  
m Ransley
 
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Charging a 12v in an 18 volt charger will not hurt the 12v battery if it
is a modern peak charger as most good chargers are. Peak is detected by
Voltage drop of cells. RC chargers can , depending on model charge 4-
16 cells, voltage is the same it is amps that control rate of charge.
Now if you charge a 18v pack in a 12 v charger it will never charge
fully. Another way of finding peak charge is when the pack just Starts
to get warm. A warm pack means electrical energy is being converted to
heat, a bad thing to do to cells. Unfortunatly heat can be generated by
the charger itself so voltage drop method is more accurate. They will
not blow up or catch fire overcharged , they just loose alot of their
life, they cook.

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Stormin Mormon
 
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Nevermind all this wussy stuff. I put a #2 phillips tip on my 10 CFM air
ratchet, wtih 400 foot pounds of torque, and 200 blows per minute.

(OK, well, I didn't do any of this, but it's fun to think about).

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com


"Pop" wrote in message
...
m Ransley wrote:
Im tired of electric, im putting in my RC cars 35000rpm
nitromethane
gas motor and clutch in my drill, now thats power to screw.


Been a long time since I"ve had this much fun just TALKING about
screwin'!

Well, gotta go look for that xfmr now. Hmm, think I had a
conductformer somewhere, now where did I put that?

/pop


  #33   Report Post  
GFRfan
 
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Stormin Mormon wrote:
Nevermind all this wussy stuff. I put a #2 phillips tip on my 10 CFM air
ratchet, wtih 400 foot pounds of torque, and 200 blows per minute.

(OK, well, I didn't do any of this, but it's fun to think about).



I played Black Sabbath at 78 speed, man.

And what happened?

I saw God!
  #34   Report Post  
Gary Stone
 
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"GFRfan" wrote in message
news:4UOTd.2759$r55.2050@attbi_s52...
Stormin Mormon wrote:
Nevermind all this wussy stuff. I put a #2 phillips tip on my 10 CFM air
ratchet, wtih 400 foot pounds of torque, and 200 blows per minute.

(OK, well, I didn't do any of this, but it's fun to think about).



I played Black Sabbath at 78 speed, man.

And what happened?

I saw God!


Play it backwards at that speed.

Tune in, turn on and drop out.

Stone
(No D on the end of that) Well, on second thought.


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Default 18 volt battery in 12 volt drill?

replying to Pop, Jason wrote:
Very creative answer, but it does show ignorance of electronic circuits. It's
quite unusual for electronic components to be rated under 25 or even 50 volts,
so it's very unlikely that 18V vs 12V will cause voltage breakdown in any
circuit component.

In an electric drill, heat is generated by the arcing at the brushes and also
from electric current passing through the file windings. Here the higher
voltage will push a higher current through the drill, which will cause more
heating. When the drill is used at slower speed, I would expect it to work
just fine. With extended drilling at full power, I would expect the drill to
heat up more. Whether this causes a problem will depend on how good the
original thermal design was. I've had 120VAC hand tools heat up and die when
run for extended periods. Some tools are designed only for short term
intermittent use. It's easy to tell when a tool overheats - just stop and let
it cool.

For short term drilling, it would probably work fine, perhaps run a little
warmer.

Design Engineer

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for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/mainte...ll-590238-.htm




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Default 18 volt battery in 12 volt drill?

replying to Pop, Jason wrote:
Ballasts are not used with batteries. Very creative but irrelevant. Batteries
connected in series don't need balancing. In any case, the issue here is the
use of an 18V battery module with a 12V tool. There are adapters available
online to do this. Whether it works well for a particular tool will depend on
the design of the tool..

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Default 18 volt battery in 12 volt drill?

replying to Pop, Rthrgrgns wrote:
If they were designed to limits they would instantly fail if you used an 18v
battery on a 12v tool. In reality it depends on the tool that said I have a
crappy b&d 12v multitool with the same connection as dewalt 18v I have been
using it with the dewalt battery for years with no issues you just stop and
let it cool if you start to smell it getting hot

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Default 18 volt battery in 12 volt drill?

I have a 14.4 Makita drill can I use a 18 v battery in it

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Default 18 volt battery in 12 volt drill?


On Thu, 26 Nov 2020 15:15:02 +0000, Maryville7 posted for all of us to
digest...


I have a 14.4 Makita drill can I use a 18 v battery in it


No

--
Tekkie
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Default 18 volt battery in 12 volt drill?

On Sat, 28 Nov 2020 16:45:51 -0500, Tekkie©
wrote:


On Thu, 26 Nov 2020 15:15:02 +0000, Maryville7 posted for all of us to
digest...


I have a 14.4 Makita drill can I use a 18 v battery in it


No

He can if it fits. AN old friend built a Zenith 601 airplane with a
7.2 volt drill run off a 12 volt car battery - and that is a LOT of
1/8" holes!!!!
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