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L Beck
 
Posts: n/a
Default bathroom floor and toilet flange

The saga continues.

Okay, so we pulled up the toilet in preparation to start the process of
laying down a new tile floor and discovered water damage severe enough to
have to replace the sewer pipe and a new flange. The damage was also enough
that we pulled up the old 1/2" particle board underlayment that was under
the vinyl (it was swelled pretty badly). Here's the problem - when we
replaced that 1/2" underlayment with 1/2" plywood that we know is the same
thickness (laid it next to some of the good stuff that wasn't damaged) the
flange no longer sits on the floor. We've got about a 1/4" gap.

One idea is to put down 1/4" plywood over the whole floor. However, by the
time we do that, we'll be raising the overall height of the new floor 3/4"
intead of 1/2" (we've got an adapter that will raise the flange connector
that much). However, if we just put a 1/4" ring under the flange so that it
sits correctly on the underflooring, then lay the new floor, will that
spacer then make the flange assembly too high and cause the toilet to sit
too high off the floor? Or if we leave the adapter out will we have trouble
with the top of the flange not sitting flush on the bottom of the toilet?

We're in a bit of a dilemna here. Do they make 1/4" flange adapters? The
sewer pipe cannot be pushed down - it sits on another water pipe (don't
ask - we didn't build the house, and the basement ceiling is finished).

If anyone has any ideas or suggestions, we'd be very grateful to hear them.
This has turned into the project from hell. Completely redid the whole
bathroom - walls, tub (refinished, not replaced), cabinets (repainted),
sink, and walls. The floor was the last piece, and it's turned into a major
undertaking.

Thanks to all in advance.

LB


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donald girod
 
Posts: n/a
Default bathroom floor and toilet flange

Actually, flange height is not all that fussy, but if it is 1/4" off the
floor, and is 1/2" thick, then you are kind of high for the toilet (total of
3/4" above the floor). When the toilet is sitting on the finished floor,
you would like at least 1/4" clearance between the horn and the flange to
leave room for the wax ring to seal. You can check how high your
particular toilet horn sits above the flange. I suspect that it is possible
that the leaking which damaged the original floor may possibly have been
caused by the flange being too high and making a thin seal. If you can't
lower the flange, then you should probably just make the floor 1/4" higher.

You say "tile floor". Is this ceramic? Because if so, then the tile itself
is going to give you at least an extra 1/4" more than, say, vinyl (the
toilet rests on top of the finished floor). But if by "tile" you just
mean vinyl tile, then raise the floor 1/4" with plywood, and deal with
whatever problems this causes (mainly at the doorway, I would think).

"L Beck" wrote in message
...
The saga continues.

Okay, so we pulled up the toilet in preparation to start the process of
laying down a new tile floor and discovered water damage severe enough to
have to replace the sewer pipe and a new flange. The damage was also

enough
that we pulled up the old 1/2" particle board underlayment that was under
the vinyl (it was swelled pretty badly). Here's the problem - when we
replaced that 1/2" underlayment with 1/2" plywood that we know is the same
thickness (laid it next to some of the good stuff that wasn't damaged) the
flange no longer sits on the floor. We've got about a 1/4" gap.

One idea is to put down 1/4" plywood over the whole floor. However, by

the
time we do that, we'll be raising the overall height of the new floor 3/4"
intead of 1/2" (we've got an adapter that will raise the flange connector
that much). However, if we just put a 1/4" ring under the flange so that

it
sits correctly on the underflooring, then lay the new floor, will that
spacer then make the flange assembly too high and cause the toilet to sit
too high off the floor? Or if we leave the adapter out will we have

trouble
with the top of the flange not sitting flush on the bottom of the toilet?

We're in a bit of a dilemna here. Do they make 1/4" flange adapters? The
sewer pipe cannot be pushed down - it sits on another water pipe (don't
ask - we didn't build the house, and the basement ceiling is finished).

If anyone has any ideas or suggestions, we'd be very grateful to hear

them.
This has turned into the project from hell. Completely redid the whole
bathroom - walls, tub (refinished, not replaced), cabinets (repainted),
sink, and walls. The floor was the last piece, and it's turned into a

major
undertaking.

Thanks to all in advance.

LB



  #3   Report Post  
L Beck
 
Posts: n/a
Default bathroom floor and toilet flange

Thanks for your reply.

Yes, it's ceramic, and we will be putting down also a 1/4" hardibacker
board, set in mortar, then the 1/4" tile, also set in mortar. If we don't
use the 1/2" adapter on the flange, we'll have *maybe* 1/4" or less of
flange above the level of the finished floor. So, I guess one other
question is - just how much of the flange needs to be above the level that
the toilet will set on?

And the major leaking that damaged the most of the floor came under the wall
at the head of the toilet from another bathroom shower drain. However, the
old flange (metal) was completely rusted away - thus all the other work.


"donald girod" wrote in message
...
Actually, flange height is not all that fussy, but if it is 1/4" off the
floor, and is 1/2" thick, then you are kind of high for the toilet (total

of
3/4" above the floor). When the toilet is sitting on the finished floor,
you would like at least 1/4" clearance between the horn and the flange to
leave room for the wax ring to seal. You can check how high your
particular toilet horn sits above the flange. I suspect that it is

possible
that the leaking which damaged the original floor may possibly have been
caused by the flange being too high and making a thin seal. If you can't
lower the flange, then you should probably just make the floor 1/4"

higher.

You say "tile floor". Is this ceramic? Because if so, then the tile

itself
is going to give you at least an extra 1/4" more than, say, vinyl (the
toilet rests on top of the finished floor). But if by "tile" you just
mean vinyl tile, then raise the floor 1/4" with plywood, and deal with
whatever problems this causes (mainly at the doorway, I would think).

"L Beck" wrote in message
...
The saga continues.

Okay, so we pulled up the toilet in preparation to start the process of
laying down a new tile floor and discovered water damage severe enough

to
have to replace the sewer pipe and a new flange. The damage was also

enough
that we pulled up the old 1/2" particle board underlayment that was

under
the vinyl (it was swelled pretty badly). Here's the problem - when we
replaced that 1/2" underlayment with 1/2" plywood that we know is the

same
thickness (laid it next to some of the good stuff that wasn't damaged)

the
flange no longer sits on the floor. We've got about a 1/4" gap.

One idea is to put down 1/4" plywood over the whole floor. However, by

the
time we do that, we'll be raising the overall height of the new floor

3/4"
intead of 1/2" (we've got an adapter that will raise the flange

connector
that much). However, if we just put a 1/4" ring under the flange so

that
it
sits correctly on the underflooring, then lay the new floor, will that
spacer then make the flange assembly too high and cause the toilet to

sit
too high off the floor? Or if we leave the adapter out will we have

trouble
with the top of the flange not sitting flush on the bottom of the

toilet?

We're in a bit of a dilemna here. Do they make 1/4" flange adapters?

The
sewer pipe cannot be pushed down - it sits on another water pipe (don't
ask - we didn't build the house, and the basement ceiling is finished).

If anyone has any ideas or suggestions, we'd be very grateful to hear

them.
This has turned into the project from hell. Completely redid the whole
bathroom - walls, tub (refinished, not replaced), cabinets (repainted),
sink, and walls. The floor was the last piece, and it's turned into a

major
undertaking.

Thanks to all in advance.

LB





  #4   Report Post  
jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default bathroom floor and toilet flange

L Beck wrote:

Thanks for your reply.

Yes, it's ceramic, and we will be putting down also a 1/4" hardibacker
board, set in mortar, then the 1/4" tile, also set in mortar. If we don't
use the 1/2" adapter on the flange, we'll have *maybe* 1/4" or less of
flange above the level of the finished floor. So, I guess one other
question is - just how much of the flange needs to be above the level that
the toilet will set on?

And the major leaking that damaged the most of the floor came under the wall
at the head of the toilet from another bathroom shower drain. However, the
old flange (metal) was completely rusted away - thus all the other work.

"donald girod" wrote in message
...
Actually, flange height is not all that fussy, but if it is 1/4" off the
floor, and is 1/2" thick, then you are kind of high for the toilet (total

of
3/4" above the floor). When the toilet is sitting on the finished floor,
you would like at least 1/4" clearance between the horn and the flange to
leave room for the wax ring to seal. You can check how high your
particular toilet horn sits above the flange. I suspect that it is

possible
that the leaking which damaged the original floor may possibly have been
caused by the flange being too high and making a thin seal. If you can't
lower the flange, then you should probably just make the floor 1/4"

higher.

You say "tile floor". Is this ceramic? Because if so, then the tile

itself
is going to give you at least an extra 1/4" more than, say, vinyl (the
toilet rests on top of the finished floor). But if by "tile" you just
mean vinyl tile, then raise the floor 1/4" with plywood, and deal with
whatever problems this causes (mainly at the doorway, I would think).

"L Beck" wrote in message
...
The saga continues.

Okay, so we pulled up the toilet in preparation to start the process of
laying down a new tile floor and discovered water damage severe enough

to
have to replace the sewer pipe and a new flange. The damage was also

enough
that we pulled up the old 1/2" particle board underlayment that was

under
the vinyl (it was swelled pretty badly). Here's the problem - when we
replaced that 1/2" underlayment with 1/2" plywood that we know is the

same
thickness (laid it next to some of the good stuff that wasn't damaged)

the
flange no longer sits on the floor. We've got about a 1/4" gap.

One idea is to put down 1/4" plywood over the whole floor. However, by

the
time we do that, we'll be raising the overall height of the new floor

3/4"
intead of 1/2" (we've got an adapter that will raise the flange

connector
that much). However, if we just put a 1/4" ring under the flange so

that
it
sits correctly on the underflooring, then lay the new floor, will that
spacer then make the flange assembly too high and cause the toilet to

sit
too high off the floor? Or if we leave the adapter out will we have

trouble
with the top of the flange not sitting flush on the bottom of the

toilet?

We're in a bit of a dilemna here. Do they make 1/4" flange adapters?

The
sewer pipe cannot be pushed down - it sits on another water pipe (don't
ask - we didn't build the house, and the basement ceiling is finished).

If anyone has any ideas or suggestions, we'd be very grateful to hear

them.
This has turned into the project from hell. Completely redid the whole
bathroom - walls, tub (refinished, not replaced), cabinets (repainted),
sink, and walls. The floor was the last piece, and it's turned into a

major
undertaking.

Thanks to all in advance.

LB



when i replaced the toilet in my home the original was down to code.. it
was a concrete floor with ceramic time on it... the flange was level
with the ceramic tile... the toilet then went onto the ceramic tile and
the wax ring took care of the seal job.. i guess this is what was done
to code as the home was built by a general contractor and each job had
to be inspected by the county and the homestead to make sure it was up
to code.....
hope this helps.
  #5   Report Post  
L Beck
 
Posts: n/a
Default bathroom floor and toilet flange

Thanks to both of you for your replys. I think we know how to proceed.
Thanks again.


"jim" wrote in message ...
L Beck wrote:

Thanks for your reply.

Yes, it's ceramic, and we will be putting down also a 1/4" hardibacker
board, set in mortar, then the 1/4" tile, also set in mortar. If we

don't
use the 1/2" adapter on the flange, we'll have *maybe* 1/4" or less of
flange above the level of the finished floor. So, I guess one other
question is - just how much of the flange needs to be above the level

that
the toilet will set on?

And the major leaking that damaged the most of the floor came under the

wall
at the head of the toilet from another bathroom shower drain. However,

the
old flange (metal) was completely rusted away - thus all the other work.

"donald girod" wrote in message
...
Actually, flange height is not all that fussy, but if it is 1/4" off

the
floor, and is 1/2" thick, then you are kind of high for the toilet

(total
of
3/4" above the floor). When the toilet is sitting on the finished

floor,
you would like at least 1/4" clearance between the horn and the flange

to
leave room for the wax ring to seal. You can check how high your
particular toilet horn sits above the flange. I suspect that it is

possible
that the leaking which damaged the original floor may possibly have

been
caused by the flange being too high and making a thin seal. If you

can't
lower the flange, then you should probably just make the floor 1/4"

higher.

You say "tile floor". Is this ceramic? Because if so, then the tile

itself
is going to give you at least an extra 1/4" more than, say, vinyl

(the
toilet rests on top of the finished floor). But if by "tile" you

just
mean vinyl tile, then raise the floor 1/4" with plywood, and deal with
whatever problems this causes (mainly at the doorway, I would think).

"L Beck" wrote in message
...
The saga continues.

Okay, so we pulled up the toilet in preparation to start the process

of
laying down a new tile floor and discovered water damage severe

enough
to
have to replace the sewer pipe and a new flange. The damage was

also
enough
that we pulled up the old 1/2" particle board underlayment that was

under
the vinyl (it was swelled pretty badly). Here's the problem - when

we
replaced that 1/2" underlayment with 1/2" plywood that we know is

the
same
thickness (laid it next to some of the good stuff that wasn't

damaged)
the
flange no longer sits on the floor. We've got about a 1/4" gap.

One idea is to put down 1/4" plywood over the whole floor. However,

by
the
time we do that, we'll be raising the overall height of the new

floor
3/4"
intead of 1/2" (we've got an adapter that will raise the flange

connector
that much). However, if we just put a 1/4" ring under the flange so

that
it
sits correctly on the underflooring, then lay the new floor, will

that
spacer then make the flange assembly too high and cause the toilet

to
sit
too high off the floor? Or if we leave the adapter out will we have
trouble
with the top of the flange not sitting flush on the bottom of the

toilet?

We're in a bit of a dilemna here. Do they make 1/4" flange

adapters?
The
sewer pipe cannot be pushed down - it sits on another water pipe

(don't
ask - we didn't build the house, and the basement ceiling is

finished).

If anyone has any ideas or suggestions, we'd be very grateful to

hear
them.
This has turned into the project from hell. Completely redid the

whole
bathroom - walls, tub (refinished, not replaced), cabinets

(repainted),
sink, and walls. The floor was the last piece, and it's turned into

a
major
undertaking.

Thanks to all in advance.

LB



when i replaced the toilet in my home the original was down to code.. it
was a concrete floor with ceramic time on it... the flange was level
with the ceramic tile... the toilet then went onto the ceramic tile and
the wax ring took care of the seal job.. i guess this is what was done
to code as the home was built by a general contractor and each job had
to be inspected by the county and the homestead to make sure it was up
to code.....
hope this helps.



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