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Old July 19th 03, 04:40 PM
Steven Kingsley
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!

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Old July 19th 03, 05:16 PM
Joseph Meehan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Yes.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"Steven Kingsley" wrote in message
om...
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!



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Old July 19th 03, 05:18 PM
Joseph Meehan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Additional note. You may want to check the size of the breaker
controlling that line. It might be good to down rate it to 15 or 20 amps.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"Steven Kingsley" wrote in message
om...
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!



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Old July 19th 03, 06:00 PM
Terry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Steven Kingsley wrote:

I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?

Thanks!


Steven:
Personally, I agree with your interpretation. But being in Canada
myself I think you are wise to confirm with a US source.
The way I have explained our North American 115/230 volt system
to some, (especially the UK where domestically they usually
'only' have two wires plus an earth; i.e. a neutral at {sort of}
zero volts and a hot at 230 volts into their consumer/unit or
main circuit breaker or fuse panel), is like this;
We have three wires coming into our North American houses along
with a ground of some sort at the point where the wires come in.
The 'middle' wire, often white is the neutral at {sort of} zero
volts. One of the other wires often (in Canada) black or red is
at plus 115 volts and the other wire red or black, say, is at
minus 115 volts.
So there is, as it were 230 volts between the two 'outer' wires.
Since we are talking about AC electricity it's not entirely true
to speak of plus and minus but it serves to explain the process.
If the three wire circuit you intend to use previously served an
electric cooking stove it's most likely got a heavy two pole of
breaker something like 40 to 60 amps? To protect the much thinner
wiring for miscellaneous functions within your new propane stove
it is an excellent idea to replace the breaker with a single pole
one of say 15 or 20 amp rating and plug or wire the new stove
into a regular duplex outlet connected only for 115 volts.
Email direct if you wish
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Old July 19th 03, 07:32 PM
D. Stoner
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Terry wrote in
:

Steven Kingsley wrote:

I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?

Thanks!


Steven:
Personally, I agree with your interpretation. But being in Canada
myself I think you are wise to confirm with a US source.
snip

Steven -

I'm also from Canada. I changed from a 230v electric range to a natural
gas range a few years ago, but of course needed a 115v supply to run the
controls.

I just bought an adapter. It plugs into the 230v range plug and covers it,
and has a standard 115v plug on the front of it. It looks like some of
those wall mounted surge protector plates, but it simply picks off one side
of the 230v supply and brings out the resulting 115v to a proper 115v plug
on the faceplate. The unit has it's own built in 15 amp fusing, so the
control circuitry in the range is properly protected. I believe the store
that sold me the range had the unit. I suspect if you ask the dealer where
you purchased your range, they will have such adapters that are compatible
with your U.S. wiring if for some reason it is different than Canadian
wiring.

The beauty of this is that if for any reason we or future purchasers of the
house want to go back to an electric range, we just have to shut off the
gas supply, remove the adapter, and plug in the electric range and it'll
work.


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Old July 19th 03, 07:47 PM
CBHvac
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Hint...
The power that comes into your home...its 220V..

We carry adaptors for all our 110-115V based equipment to run them when
working on AC units, where there is no 110-115V outlet nearby...

"Steven Kingsley" wrote in message
om...
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!



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Old July 20th 03, 01:25 AM
John_B
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in theUS?

I asked an electrician to install a 110V outlet from a 220 V dryer
box -- he refused because it was not in conformity with our local
code. What is technically possible is not necessarily code compliant.

Steven Kingsley wrote:
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!


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Old July 20th 03, 02:52 AM
Mark or Sue
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?


"John_B" wrote in message
...
I asked an electrician to install a 110V outlet from a 220 V dryer
box -- he refused because it was not in conformity with our local
code. What is technically possible is not necessarily code compliant.


About the only thing that would prevent this (NEC wise) is lack of a
grounding wire. Functionally, you could move the red wire to the ground bus
and color it green, but that is not NEC compliant. This applies both to 30A
dryer and 50A range circuits.

If you have a grounding wire and a white and a black, I don't know how this
could violate a local code unles you have some really onerous rules.

--
Mark
Kent, WA



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Old July 20th 03, 02:57 AM
Terry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in theUS?

John_B wrote:

I asked an electrician to install a 110V outlet from a 220 V dryer
box -- he refused because it was not in conformity with our local
code. What is technically possible is not necessarily code compliant.

Steven Kingsley wrote:
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!


I wonder why your code says 'no'. Especially since someone has
described an 'adapter' complete with 15 amp fuse. Neat idea; glad
someone mentioned it.
But maybe it IS to avoid 'modifications' that the not
knowledgeable (amateur electricians) may not understand even
though as John B says "is technically possible".
We can all probably list stupid and unsafe things that people do;
even when everything in their house is absolutely to code!
Here are my few contributions.
1) A lady's phone was grimy so she ran it through the dishwasher
with a load of dirty dishes! Afterwards it didn't work and put
the phone line out of service! In another case an outside pool
phone fell into a swimming pool from a rickety table/stand;
twice! The same house also left the pool phone out in the rain.
2) Someone shampooed their cat. Then put it in the microwave to
dry!
3) Someone ran an extension cord into a bathroom and plugged in
an electric heater! The story I heard was that someone fell over
the heater getting out of the bath but, fortunately, did not get
a shock!
4) A food outlet owner took the door off a microwave oven, jammed
the door switches so it would operate continuously; at least two
employees got burns to their hands putting food in/out! Along
same lines; a microwave in a train's lunch bar mounted about 15
inches immediately behind the head of the person serving
food/drinks! Lots of jolting motion on a train!
5) The couple who, during an extensive power failure brought
their gas barbecue inside the house and asphyxiated themselves.
  #10   Report Post  
Old July 20th 03, 08:06 AM
meirman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in theUS?

In alt.home.repair on Sat, 19 Jul 2003 22:27:56 -0230 Terry
posted:


Thanks!


I wonder why your code says 'no'. Especially since someone has
described an 'adapter' complete with 15 amp fuse. Neat idea; glad
someone mentioned it.
But maybe it IS to avoid 'modifications' that the not
knowledgeable (amateur electricians) may not understand even
though as John B says "is technically possible".
We can all probably list stupid and unsafe things that people do;
even when everything in their house is absolutely to code!
Here are my few contributions.
1) A lady's phone was grimy so she ran it through the dishwasher
with a load of dirty dishes! Afterwards it didn't work and put


This is a badddd idea. LOL. But if you put the cords in the
dishwasher, they come out great! (I don't use hot air to dry. I just
use time.)


the phone line out of service! In another case an outside pool
phone fell into a swimming pool from a rickety table/stand;
twice! The same house also left the pool phone out in the rain.
2) Someone shampooed their cat. Then put it in the microwave to
dry!
3) Someone ran an extension cord into a bathroom and plugged in
an electric heater! The story I heard was that someone fell over
the heater getting out of the bath but, fortunately, did not get
a shock!
4) A food outlet owner took the door off a microwave oven, jammed
the door switches so it would operate continuously; at least two
employees got burns to their hands putting food in/out! Along
same lines; a microwave in a train's lunch bar mounted about 15
inches immediately behind the head of the person serving
food/drinks! Lots of jolting motion on a train!
5) The couple who, during an extensive power failure brought
their gas barbecue inside the house and asphyxiated themselves.



Meirman

If emailing, please let me know whether
or not you are posting the same letter.

Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.


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