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  #1   Report Post  
Steven Kingsley
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!
  #2   Report Post  
Joseph Meehan
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Yes.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"Steven Kingsley" wrote in message
om...
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!



  #3   Report Post  
Joseph Meehan
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Additional note. You may want to check the size of the breaker
controlling that line. It might be good to down rate it to 15 or 20 amps.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"Steven Kingsley" wrote in message
om...
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!



  #4   Report Post  
Terry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Steven Kingsley wrote:

I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?

Thanks!


Steven:
Personally, I agree with your interpretation. But being in Canada
myself I think you are wise to confirm with a US source.
The way I have explained our North American 115/230 volt system
to some, (especially the UK where domestically they usually
'only' have two wires plus an earth; i.e. a neutral at {sort of}
zero volts and a hot at 230 volts into their consumer/unit or
main circuit breaker or fuse panel), is like this;
We have three wires coming into our North American houses along
with a ground of some sort at the point where the wires come in.
The 'middle' wire, often white is the neutral at {sort of} zero
volts. One of the other wires often (in Canada) black or red is
at plus 115 volts and the other wire red or black, say, is at
minus 115 volts.
So there is, as it were 230 volts between the two 'outer' wires.
Since we are talking about AC electricity it's not entirely true
to speak of plus and minus but it serves to explain the process.
If the three wire circuit you intend to use previously served an
electric cooking stove it's most likely got a heavy two pole of
breaker something like 40 to 60 amps? To protect the much thinner
wiring for miscellaneous functions within your new propane stove
it is an excellent idea to replace the breaker with a single pole
one of say 15 or 20 amp rating and plug or wire the new stove
into a regular duplex outlet connected only for 115 volts.
Email direct if you wish
  #5   Report Post  
D. Stoner
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Terry wrote in
:

Steven Kingsley wrote:

I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?

Thanks!


Steven:
Personally, I agree with your interpretation. But being in Canada
myself I think you are wise to confirm with a US source.
snip

Steven -

I'm also from Canada. I changed from a 230v electric range to a natural
gas range a few years ago, but of course needed a 115v supply to run the
controls.

I just bought an adapter. It plugs into the 230v range plug and covers it,
and has a standard 115v plug on the front of it. It looks like some of
those wall mounted surge protector plates, but it simply picks off one side
of the 230v supply and brings out the resulting 115v to a proper 115v plug
on the faceplate. The unit has it's own built in 15 amp fusing, so the
control circuitry in the range is properly protected. I believe the store
that sold me the range had the unit. I suspect if you ask the dealer where
you purchased your range, they will have such adapters that are compatible
with your U.S. wiring if for some reason it is different than Canadian
wiring.

The beauty of this is that if for any reason we or future purchasers of the
house want to go back to an electric range, we just have to shut off the
gas supply, remove the adapter, and plug in the electric range and it'll
work.


  #6   Report Post  
CBHvac
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Hint...
The power that comes into your home...its 220V..

We carry adaptors for all our 110-115V based equipment to run them when
working on AC units, where there is no 110-115V outlet nearby...

"Steven Kingsley" wrote in message
om...
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!



  #7   Report Post  
John_B
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in theUS?

I asked an electrician to install a 110V outlet from a 220 V dryer
box -- he refused because it was not in conformity with our local
code. What is technically possible is not necessarily code compliant.

Steven Kingsley wrote:
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!


  #8   Report Post  
Mark or Sue
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?


"John_B" wrote in message
...
I asked an electrician to install a 110V outlet from a 220 V dryer
box -- he refused because it was not in conformity with our local
code. What is technically possible is not necessarily code compliant.


About the only thing that would prevent this (NEC wise) is lack of a
grounding wire. Functionally, you could move the red wire to the ground bus
and color it green, but that is not NEC compliant. This applies both to 30A
dryer and 50A range circuits.

If you have a grounding wire and a white and a black, I don't know how this
could violate a local code unles you have some really onerous rules.

--
Mark
Kent, WA



  #9   Report Post  
Terry
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in theUS?

John_B wrote:

I asked an electrician to install a 110V outlet from a 220 V dryer
box -- he refused because it was not in conformity with our local
code. What is technically possible is not necessarily code compliant.

Steven Kingsley wrote:
I just purchased a new house and am installing a new gas range. I
had a heating company come out and pipe gas to the location of the
stove, but will still need to figure something out for electricity.

I've seen several websites and newsgroup posts saying that you can
derive a 110 volt by using one of the hot wires from your range outlet
and the neutral wire.

It makes sense to me, being that our 220s are just two 110s. However,
all the sites that confirm this information are Canadian and I'm
afraid that appliance wiring between the two countries might be a bit
different. Before I electrocute myself, are there any US based
electricians out there that can confirm?


Thanks!


I wonder why your code says 'no'. Especially since someone has
described an 'adapter' complete with 15 amp fuse. Neat idea; glad
someone mentioned it.
But maybe it IS to avoid 'modifications' that the not
knowledgeable (amateur electricians) may not understand even
though as John B says "is technically possible".
We can all probably list stupid and unsafe things that people do;
even when everything in their house is absolutely to code!
Here are my few contributions.
1) A lady's phone was grimy so she ran it through the dishwasher
with a load of dirty dishes! Afterwards it didn't work and put
the phone line out of service! In another case an outside pool
phone fell into a swimming pool from a rickety table/stand;
twice! The same house also left the pool phone out in the rain.
2) Someone shampooed their cat. Then put it in the microwave to
dry!
3) Someone ran an extension cord into a bathroom and plugged in
an electric heater! The story I heard was that someone fell over
the heater getting out of the bath but, fortunately, did not get
a shock!
4) A food outlet owner took the door off a microwave oven, jammed
the door switches so it would operate continuously; at least two
employees got burns to their hands putting food in/out! Along
same lines; a microwave in a train's lunch bar mounted about 15
inches immediately behind the head of the person serving
food/drinks! Lots of jolting motion on a train!
5) The couple who, during an extensive power failure brought
their gas barbecue inside the house and asphyxiated themselves.
  #10   Report Post  
meirman
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in theUS?

In alt.home.repair on Sat, 19 Jul 2003 22:27:56 -0230 Terry
posted:


Thanks!


I wonder why your code says 'no'. Especially since someone has
described an 'adapter' complete with 15 amp fuse. Neat idea; glad
someone mentioned it.
But maybe it IS to avoid 'modifications' that the not
knowledgeable (amateur electricians) may not understand even
though as John B says "is technically possible".
We can all probably list stupid and unsafe things that people do;
even when everything in their house is absolutely to code!
Here are my few contributions.
1) A lady's phone was grimy so she ran it through the dishwasher
with a load of dirty dishes! Afterwards it didn't work and put


This is a badddd idea. LOL. But if you put the cords in the
dishwasher, they come out great! (I don't use hot air to dry. I just
use time.)


the phone line out of service! In another case an outside pool
phone fell into a swimming pool from a rickety table/stand;
twice! The same house also left the pool phone out in the rain.
2) Someone shampooed their cat. Then put it in the microwave to
dry!
3) Someone ran an extension cord into a bathroom and plugged in
an electric heater! The story I heard was that someone fell over
the heater getting out of the bath but, fortunately, did not get
a shock!
4) A food outlet owner took the door off a microwave oven, jammed
the door switches so it would operate continuously; at least two
employees got burns to their hands putting food in/out! Along
same lines; a microwave in a train's lunch bar mounted about 15
inches immediately behind the head of the person serving
food/drinks! Lots of jolting motion on a train!
5) The couple who, during an extensive power failure brought
their gas barbecue inside the house and asphyxiated themselves.



Meirman

If emailing, please let me know whether
or not you are posting the same letter.

Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.


  #11   Report Post  
Steven Kingsley
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

You guys are the best! Thanks for all the great information.

Now that I have confirmation that using a hot , neutral, and ground is
safe; I wonder if anyone knows of a place in Canada that would ship an
adapter to the states?

Seems like it would be a lot easier than replacing circuit breakers
and everything at the junction box.

I've been to three hardware stores and one appliance shop asking about
the adapter. They all hadn't hear of it, but thought it was the most
brilliant idea ever.

For those who haven't seen one..

http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html

Steven
  #13   Report Post  
Gary Tait
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in theUS?

On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 02:06:25 -0400, meirman
wrote:

1) A lady's phone was grimy so she ran it through the dishwasher
with a load of dirty dishes! Afterwards it didn't work and put


This is a badddd idea. LOL. But if you put the cords in the
dishwasher, they come out great! (I don't use hot air to dry. I just
use time.)


Actually, it may work if you dry the phone in your oven, pre-heated to
170 degrees (turned off after pre-heat), overnight.
  #14   Report Post  
Joseph Meehan
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

I like the built in fuse. It looks good. The question I have is about
plug. There are a number of different plugs\outlets used. Are you sure you
are getting a matched set?

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"Steven Kingsley" wrote in message
m...
You guys are the best! Thanks for all the great information.

Now that I have confirmation that using a hot , neutral, and ground is
safe; I wonder if anyone knows of a place in Canada that would ship an
adapter to the states?

Seems like it would be a lot easier than replacing circuit breakers
and everything at the junction box.

I've been to three hardware stores and one appliance shop asking about
the adapter. They all hadn't hear of it, but thought it was the most
brilliant idea ever.

For those who haven't seen one..

http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html

Steven



  #15   Report Post  
ameijers
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in theUS?


"Gary Tait" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 02:06:25 -0400, meirman
wrote:

1) A lady's phone was grimy so she ran it through the dishwasher
with a load of dirty dishes! Afterwards it didn't work and put


This is a badddd idea. LOL. But if you put the cords in the
dishwasher, they come out great! (I don't use hot air to dry. I just
use time.)


Actually, it may work if you dry the phone in your oven, pre-heated to
170 degrees (turned off after pre-heat), overnight.

Heh. No need to get the working parts wet. I used to 'rebuild' Real Phones
(you know, the kind that lasted 40+ years and weighed about six pounds) by
pulling off shell, dial/TTpad cover, field stripping handset cover, etc, and
washing all the pretty parts with dish soap. Set on sunny window overnight
to dry, and reassemble. Never tried washing cords, though, other than with
windex and a soggy rag.

aem sends...



  #16   Report Post  
D. Stoner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

(Steven Kingsley) wrote in
m:

You guys are the best! Thanks for all the great information.

Now that I have confirmation that using a hot , neutral, and ground is
safe; I wonder if anyone knows of a place in Canada that would ship an
adapter to the states?

Seems like it would be a lot easier than replacing circuit breakers
and everything at the junction box.

I've been to three hardware stores and one appliance shop asking about
the adapter. They all hadn't hear of it, but thought it was the most
brilliant idea ever.

For those who haven't seen one..

http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html

Steven


That's the adapter I have - works great. I just checked Home Depot here
and they have them in the electrical section under "Gas Appliance Adapter".
They don't ship anywhere, but I'd imagine there are Home Depots in pretty
much every state.

I could be wrong, but I believe that where I am in Canada there is only one
configuration for 220v range plugs. There is a different configuration for
220v electric clothes dryer plugs, so the adapter is for ranges only. It
wasn't a problem when we converted the electric dryer to gas, however,
since there was already a 110v receptacle for the washing machine next to
the dryer.
  #17   Report Post  
Joseph Meehan
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

There have been at least two different outlet/plugs for ovens in the US.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"D. Stoner" wrote in message
50.14...
(Steven Kingsley) wrote in
m:

You guys are the best! Thanks for all the great information.

Now that I have confirmation that using a hot , neutral, and ground is
safe; I wonder if anyone knows of a place in Canada that would ship an
adapter to the states?

Seems like it would be a lot easier than replacing circuit breakers
and everything at the junction box.

I've been to three hardware stores and one appliance shop asking about
the adapter. They all hadn't hear of it, but thought it was the most
brilliant idea ever.

For those who haven't seen one..

http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html

Steven


That's the adapter I have - works great. I just checked Home Depot here
and they have them in the electrical section under "Gas Appliance

Adapter".
They don't ship anywhere, but I'd imagine there are Home Depots in pretty
much every state.

I could be wrong, but I believe that where I am in Canada there is only

one
configuration for 220v range plugs. There is a different configuration

for
220v electric clothes dryer plugs, so the adapter is for ranges only. It
wasn't a problem when we converted the electric dryer to gas, however,
since there was already a 110v receptacle for the washing machine next to
the dryer.



  #18   Report Post  
Steven Kingsley
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

They don't sell them at The Home Depot in the US. Thanks for the suggestion though.
  #19   Report Post  
Steven Kingsley
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

That's a good question. My range outlet, starting at the top, as one
vertical prong, two vertical prongs side by side in the center, and a
round ground prong on the bottom.

It's difficult to tell from the adapter photo if it would be match,
but there's nothing in the photos that makes me think it wouldn't.
  #20   Report Post  
meirman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

In alt.home.repair on Sun, 20 Jul 2003 17:05:52 GMT "D. Stoner"
posted:

(Steven Kingsley) wrote in
om:

You guys are the best! Thanks for all the great information.

Now that I have confirmation that using a hot , neutral, and ground is
safe; I wonder if anyone knows of a place in Canada that would ship an
adapter to the states?

Seems like it would be a lot easier than replacing circuit breakers
and everything at the junction box.

I've been to three hardware stores and one appliance shop asking about
the adapter. They all hadn't hear of it, but thought it was the most
brilliant idea ever.

For those who haven't seen one..

http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html

Steven


That's the adapter I have - works great. I just checked Home Depot here
and they have them in the electrical section under "Gas Appliance Adapter".
They don't ship anywhere, but I'd imagine there are Home Depots in pretty
much every state.


Isn't Home Depot the one with the horrible website.

I put in water faucets and it gave a list of categories. One was
single handle so I clicked on that. It said there were none at the
store near me. Then wanted to know another zipcode so that it could
look at another store. I actually knew a zipcode near another store,
and again it said not sold at that store. It wanted another zipcode.
I don't know anymore zipcodes. Just give me the next closest store.

Or don't break it up by store in the first place. Show me everything
you sell and if it is worth it, I'll drive 20 miles to buy it.

It turns out both stores, all stores, sell single handled kitchen
faucets, of course.

I could be wrong, but I believe that where I am in Canada there is only one
configuration for 220v range plugs. There is a different configuration for
220v electric clothes dryer plugs, so the adapter is for ranges only. It
wasn't a problem when we converted the electric dryer to gas, however,
since there was already a 110v receptacle for the washing machine next to
the dryer.


That photo didn't look like a USA 220 outlet to me. I think we have
two too, but teh one in the picture looks like a standard 110volt ac
plug.

Meirman

If emailing, please let me know whether
or not you are posting the same letter.

Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.


  #21   Report Post  
Joseph Meehan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

I know Lowes has that, got to have the zip code, thing. I hate it. It
would not be so bad if I could put in a code for any store in my city where
there are half a dozen of them, but no I have to check them one by one and I
have to know their zip codes to do it.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"meirman" wrote in message
...
In alt.home.repair on Sun, 20 Jul 2003 17:05:52 GMT "D. Stoner"
posted:

(Steven Kingsley) wrote in
om:

You guys are the best! Thanks for all the great information.

Now that I have confirmation that using a hot , neutral, and ground is
safe; I wonder if anyone knows of a place in Canada that would ship an
adapter to the states?

Seems like it would be a lot easier than replacing circuit breakers
and everything at the junction box.

I've been to three hardware stores and one appliance shop asking about
the adapter. They all hadn't hear of it, but thought it was the most
brilliant idea ever.

For those who haven't seen one..

http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html

Steven


That's the adapter I have - works great. I just checked Home Depot here
and they have them in the electrical section under "Gas Appliance

Adapter".
They don't ship anywhere, but I'd imagine there are Home Depots in pretty
much every state.


Isn't Home Depot the one with the horrible website.

I put in water faucets and it gave a list of categories. One was
single handle so I clicked on that. It said there were none at the
store near me. Then wanted to know another zipcode so that it could
look at another store. I actually knew a zipcode near another store,
and again it said not sold at that store. It wanted another zipcode.
I don't know anymore zipcodes. Just give me the next closest store.

Or don't break it up by store in the first place. Show me everything
you sell and if it is worth it, I'll drive 20 miles to buy it.

It turns out both stores, all stores, sell single handled kitchen
faucets, of course.

I could be wrong, but I believe that where I am in Canada there is only

one
configuration for 220v range plugs. There is a different configuration

for
220v electric clothes dryer plugs, so the adapter is for ranges only. It
wasn't a problem when we converted the electric dryer to gas, however,
since there was already a 110v receptacle for the washing machine next to
the dryer.


That photo didn't look like a USA 220 outlet to me. I think we have
two too, but teh one in the picture looks like a standard 110volt ac
plug.

Meirman

If emailing, please let me know whether
or not you are posting the same letter.

Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.



  #24   Report Post  
D. Stoner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Gary Tait wrote in
:

On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 00:38:44 -0400, meirman
wrote:

I could be wrong, but I believe that where I am in Canada there is
only one configuration for 220v range plugs. There is a different
configuration for


AFAIK, Canada has never allowed 3-prong (AKA crows-foot) for range and
dryer recepticles (although 220V only appliances used them). You
either wired those appliances in, or used a NEMA 14-50/30 4 prong
plug/recepticle. Thr dryer recepticle is nearly identical toa range
one, excepte the neutral slot is L shaped, as opposed to straight on a
range one.

In 1996 or so, USA code adopted the NEMA 14-50/30 for Range/Dryer,
and banned new installations of the crow-foot type of fittings.

220v electric clothes dryer plugs, so the adapter is for ranges only.
It wasn't a problem when we converted the electric dryer to gas,
however, since there was already a 110v receptacle for the washing
machine next to the dryer.


That photo didn't look like a USA 220 outlet to me. I think we have
two too, but teh one in the picture looks like a standard 110volt ac
plug.

Meirman




With reference to http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm ,
it would appear that in both Canada and the U.S. ranges are now wired using
NEMA 14-50R receptacles. The adapter, with a NEMA 14-50P plug, works with
it. Seems to me the adapter should work in both countries. I think the
reason the picture looks like a 110volt ac plug is because it doesn't have
a size reference (much larger than a 110v plug), and the "Y" prong is
hidden behind the cardboard packaging. What you're seeing in the picture
at http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html are the "G", "X", and "W"
prongs.
  #25   Report Post  
Gary Tait
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 17:57:21 GMT, "D. Stoner"
wrote:


With reference to http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm ,
it would appear that in both Canada and the U.S. ranges are now wired using
NEMA 14-50R receptacles. The adapter, with a NEMA 14-50P plug, works with
it. Seems to me the adapter should work in both countries. I think the
reason the picture looks like a 110volt ac plug is because it doesn't have
a size reference (much larger than a 110v plug), and the "Y" prong is
hidden behind the cardboard packaging. What you're seeing in the picture
at http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html are the "G", "X", and "W"
prongs.


Actually, in that device, the Y prong is not present, whatsoever (it
is not needed, for any reason).


  #26   Report Post  
D. Stoner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Gary Tait wrote in
:

On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 17:57:21 GMT, "D. Stoner"
wrote:


With reference to http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm ,
it would appear that in both Canada and the U.S. ranges are now wired
using NEMA 14-50R receptacles. The adapter, with a NEMA 14-50P plug,
works with it. Seems to me the adapter should work in both countries.
I think the reason the picture looks like a 110volt ac plug is
because it doesn't have a size reference (much larger than a 110v
plug), and the "Y" prong is hidden behind the cardboard packaging.
What you're seeing in the picture at
http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html are the "G", "X", and "W"
prongs.


Actually, in that device, the Y prong is not present, whatsoever (it
is not needed, for any reason).


Interesting. I know the "Y" prong is not needed for any reason, other than
to make the plug look standard, but the unit I held in my hand at
the store yesterday which was identical the the one in the pic had 4
prongs, as does the one I bought and connected to my own stove years ago.
I guess yours isn't the same as mine.
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meirman
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

In alt.home.repair on Mon, 21 Jul 2003 11:49:56 -0400 Gary Tait
posted:

I could be wrong, but I believe that where I am in Canada there is only one
configuration for 220v range plugs. There is a different configuration for


AFAIK, Canada has never allowed 3-prong (AKA crows-foot) for range and
dryer recepticles (although 220V only appliances used them). You
either wired those appliances in, or used a NEMA 14-50/30 4 prong
plug/recepticle. Thr dryer recepticle is nearly identical toa range
one, excepte the neutral slot is L shaped, as opposed to straight on a
range one.

In 1996 or so, USA code adopted the NEMA 14-50/30 for Range/Dryer,
and banned new installations of the crow-foot type of fittings.


So if I ever need a new dryer, I have to buy a new receptacle or save
the cord from the old dryer and use that.

Thanks.


Meirman

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or not you are posting the same letter.

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  #28   Report Post  
meirman
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

In alt.home.repair on Mon, 21 Jul 2003 20:39:32 -0400 Gary Tait
posted:

On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 17:57:21 GMT, "D. Stoner"
wrote:


With reference to http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm ,
it would appear that in both Canada and the U.S. ranges are now wired using
NEMA 14-50R receptacles. The adapter, with a NEMA 14-50P plug, works with
it. Seems to me the adapter should work in both countries. I think the
reason the picture looks like a 110volt ac plug is because it doesn't have
a size reference (much larger than a 110v plug), and the "Y" prong is
hidden behind the cardboard packaging. What you're seeing in the picture
at http://www.applianceaid.com/adaptor.html are the "G", "X", and "W"
prongs.


Maybe. I couldn't tell.

Actually, in that device, the Y prong is not present, whatsoever (it
is not needed, for any reason).


That too. LOL

Meirman

If emailing, please let me know whether
or not you are posting the same letter.

Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
  #29   Report Post  
meirman
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

In alt.home.repair on Tue, 22 Jul 2003 11:20:05 -0400 Gary Tait
posted:

On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 22:13:47 -0400, meirman
wrote:

In alt.home.repair on Mon, 21 Jul 2003 11:49:56 -0400 Gary Tait
posted:

I could be wrong, but I believe that where I am in Canada there is only one
configuration for 220v range plugs. There is a different configuration for

AFAIK, Canada has never allowed 3-prong (AKA crows-foot) for range and
dryer recepticles (although 220V only appliances used them). You
either wired those appliances in, or used a NEMA 14-50/30 4 prong
plug/recepticle. Thr dryer recepticle is nearly identical toa range
one, excepte the neutral slot is L shaped, as opposed to straight on a
range one.

In 1996 or so, USA code adopted the NEMA 14-50/30 for Range/Dryer,
and banned new installations of the crow-foot type of fittings.


So if I ever need a new dryer, I have to buy a new receptacle or save
the cord from the old dryer and use that.


Save the old cord perhaps. If you have the old style Crow-foot
recepticle,
and wish to change it to a 4-prong one, you will need to ensure there
are 4 wires in the box, or will have to replace the existing cable
with a 4 wire.


Thanks again. I'm not running new cable and I doubt there are 4 wires
there already.

Thanks.


Meirman


Meirman

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or not you are posting the same letter.

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Steven Kingsley
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

Gary -

My range does have a NEMA 14-50 outlet. This is the first house that
I've ever lived in with an outlet like this. That's probably because
the house is newly constructed and complies with the new rules.

You're also right on with the dryer. I had to go and buy a dryer
cable that had the L shaped prong on the bottom.

Thanks!

Steven


  #31   Report Post  
Steven Kingsley
 
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Default Can you derive a 110 volt outlet from a 4 wire 220 volt in the US?

I just got my adapter from the Portland Oregon branch of Canada-based
Reliable Parts. The adapter worked like a charm! I just don't
understand why these adapters aren't more readily available in the US.

If anyone needs one, you can order for delivery in Canada or the US
through www.reliableparts.com . They're wonderful!

Whoo hoo!

Thank you Reliable Parts!

Thank you Canada!
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