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Old January 17th 11, 04:57 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default cultured marble repair

We have a cultured marble sink with a couple of hairline cracks
radiating out from the outlet, less than half an inch in length.

There is no leakage, and the cracks don't appear on the bottom of the
sink, so I think this is just a cosmetic problem, but I would like to
fix it.

I've read that polymer resin can be used for this purpose, but I think
these cracks, being hairline width, are too tight for resin to get into
the cracks, which makes me think I should widen the cracks before
applying the resin, which I'm not real eager to do lest I make a small
problem into a big one.

Is there a very thin, watery resin that would sink into a hairline
crack, or a proven technique to solve this problem, or should I just
keep ignoring it?

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Old January 17th 11, 06:37 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default cultured marble repair

On Jan 17, 9:57*am, Notat Home wrote:
We have a cultured marble sink with a couple of hairline cracks
radiating out from the outlet, less than half an inch in length.

There is no leakage, and the cracks don't appear on the bottom of the
sink, so I think this is just a cosmetic problem, but I would like to
fix it.

I've read that polymer resin can be used for this purpose, but I think
these cracks, being hairline width, are too tight for resin to get into
the cracks, which makes me think I should widen the cracks before
applying the resin, which I'm not real eager to do lest I make a small
problem into a big one.

Is there a very thin, watery resin that would sink into a hairline
crack, or a proven technique to solve this problem, or should I just
keep ignoring it?


I would use a simple epoxy, push it into the cracks with the bowl of
an old spoon, and then wire off all excess immediately.
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Old January 17th 11, 06:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default cultured marble repair

On 1/17/2011 10:57 AM, Notat Home wrote:
We have a cultured marble sink with a couple of hairline cracks
radiating out from the outlet, less than half an inch in length.

There is no leakage, and the cracks don't appear on the bottom of the
sink, so I think this is just a cosmetic problem, but I would like to
fix it.

I've read that polymer resin can be used for this purpose, but I think
these cracks, being hairline width, are too tight for resin to get into
the cracks, which makes me think I should widen the cracks before
applying the resin, which I'm not real eager to do lest I make a small
problem into a big one.

Is there a very thin, watery resin that would sink into a hairline
crack, or a proven technique to solve this problem, or should I just
keep ignoring it?


Depends on the polymer. If acrylic, there are kits that will even give
you a color match. Ones I'm familiar with but don't know how they are
retailed are used for Corian and there may be information at the DuPont
or Corian web site. I think they also sell a cultured marble. They
consist of an acrylic monomer/polymer/color mix as one part and second
part curing agent.
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Old January 17th 11, 06:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 306
Default cultured marble repair

Notat Home wrote:
We have a cultured marble sink with a couple of hairline cracks
radiating out from the outlet, less than half an inch in length.

There is no leakage, and the cracks don't appear on the bottom of the
sink, so I think this is just a cosmetic problem, but I would like to
fix it.

I've read that polymer resin can be used for this purpose, but I think
these cracks, being hairline width, are too tight for resin to get
into the cracks, which makes me think I should widen the cracks before
applying the resin, which I'm not real eager to do lest I make a small
problem into a big one.

Is there a very thin, watery resin that would sink into a hairline
crack, or a proven technique to solve this problem, or should I just
keep ignoring it?


you can get a water thin epoxy, used for this application. try a place that
sells granite slabs. i've used http://www.defusco.com/ for granite tools
and such. good prices and excellant service (no affiliation, yada).


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Old January 18th 11, 10:19 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Joe Joe is offline
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Default cultured marble repair

On Jan 17, 9:57*am, Notat Home wrote:
We have a cultured marble sink with a couple of hairline cracks
radiating out from the outlet, less than half an inch in length.

There is no leakage, and the cracks don't appear on the bottom of the
sink, so I think this is just a cosmetic problem, but I would like to
fix it.

I've read that polymer resin can be used for this purpose, but I think
these cracks, being hairline width, are too tight for resin to get into
the cracks, which makes me think I should widen the cracks before
applying the resin, which I'm not real eager to do lest I make a small
problem into a big one.

Is there a very thin, watery resin that would sink into a hairline
crack, or a proven technique to solve this problem, or should I just
keep ignoring it?


The lowest viscosity cements in the market are the cyanoacrylates
(Crazy Glue, similar). They will be compatible with the casting resin
of your sink and should flow into the crack better than any other
resins. Various viscosities are on the market now, especially 3M for
example.

Joe


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