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Old September 18th 09, 06:46 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Keeping Washing Machine from Freezing

My Virginia tree farm near the Blue Ridge Parkway is remote and has no
grid power. I currently only work it on weekends. My agricultural well
is generator operated. I use large pressure storage tanks for the well
water, and the shed that encloses my well and tanks is 8' x 12' in
size. I want to put an older working washing machine in the well pump
shed, and use it to do cold water washes.

I am insulating the pump shed (at about 1500 ft elevation near Stuart,
VA) to ~R19. When freezing weather comes I pump the water out of the
well pressure tanks and above ground pipes to protect them from
freezing damages. My question is about the washing machine that I want
to keep in the same shed.

Can I use compressed air at the water intake hose to blow water out of
the washing machine for freezing weather storage? I heard that would
still leave water in the washer's drain trap, which could freeze and
rupture plumbing.

How might one 'winterize' a washing machine for possible freezing
temperatures? Could I use RV water tank antifreeze by pouring some in
the water intake while the machine is set to fill the wash drum, and
then by setting the machine to 'drain' so that the antifreeze would
occupy both fill and drain lines?

I realize already that this is an atypical location and usage for a
washing machine. Relocating the machine to an alternate location is
not an option for me. Thanks for any help folks may have on this
unusual query.


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Old September 18th 09, 08:00 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Keeping Washing Machine from Freezing

On Sep 18, 12:46*pm, VaTreeFarmer wrote:
My Virginia tree farm near the Blue Ridge Parkway is remote and has no
grid power. I currently only work it on weekends. My agricultural well
is generator operated. I use large pressure storage tanks for the well
water, and the shed that encloses my well and tanks is 8' x 12' in
size. I want to put an older working washing machine in the well pump
shed, and use it to do cold water washes.

I am insulating the pump shed (at about 1500 ft elevation near Stuart,
VA) to ~R19. When freezing weather comes I pump the water out of the
well pressure tanks and above ground pipes to protect them from
freezing damages. My question is about the washing machine that I want
to keep in the same shed.

Can I use compressed air at the water intake hose to blow water out of
the washing machine for freezing weather storage? I heard that would
still leave water in the washer's drain trap, which could freeze and
rupture plumbing.

How might one 'winterize' a washing machine for possible freezing
temperatures? Could I use RV water tank antifreeze by pouring some in
the water intake while the machine is set to fill the wash drum, and
then by setting the machine to 'drain' so that the antifreeze would
occupy both fill and drain lines?

I realize already that this is an atypical location and usage for a
washing machine. Relocating the machine to an alternate location is
not an option for me. Thanks for any help folks may have on this
unusual query.


You can just pour a gallon of rv antifreeze in it.
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Old September 18th 09, 08:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Keeping Washing Machine from Freezing


"VaTreeFarmer" wrote in message
...
My Virginia tree farm near the Blue Ridge Parkway is remote and has no
grid power. I currently only work it on weekends. My agricultural well
is generator operated. I use large pressure storage tanks for the well
water, and the shed that encloses my well and tanks is 8' x 12' in
size. I want to put an older working washing machine in the well pump
shed, and use it to do cold water washes.

I am insulating the pump shed (at about 1500 ft elevation near Stuart,
VA) to ~R19. When freezing weather comes I pump the water out of the
well pressure tanks and above ground pipes to protect them from
freezing damages. My question is about the washing machine that I want
to keep in the same shed.

Can I use compressed air at the water intake hose to blow water out of
the washing machine for freezing weather storage? I heard that would
still leave water in the washer's drain trap, which could freeze and
rupture plumbing.

How might one 'winterize' a washing machine for possible freezing
temperatures? Could I use RV water tank antifreeze by pouring some in
the water intake while the machine is set to fill the wash drum, and
then by setting the machine to 'drain' so that the antifreeze would
occupy both fill and drain lines?

I realize already that this is an atypical location and usage for a
washing machine. Relocating the machine to an alternate location is
not an option for me. Thanks for any help folks may have on this
unusual query.




*Many years ago when I worked for my father a lot of his work was in dry
cleaning plants and Laundromats. I remember seeing some washing machines
being changed over to gravity discharge instead of using the pump to extract
the dirty water because the drains were in the floor. These were commercial
washing machines and a factory conversion kit was used for the changeover.
Perhaps something like that is available for residential machines. I never
inquired. Of course you would still need to drain the inlet hoses, but it
would not be too difficult to just disconnect them.

I'm thinking that antifreeze might leave a residue film that may affect the
clothes.

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Old September 18th 09, 10:57 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Keeping Washing Machine from Freezing

On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 14:45:13 -0400, John Grabowski wrote:
*Many years ago when I worked for my father a lot of his work was in dry
cleaning plants and Laundromats. I remember seeing some washing machines
being changed over to gravity discharge instead of using the pump to extract
the dirty water because the drains were in the floor.


Interesting. I had a washing machine freeze on me a couple of years
ago - the water in the pump / outlet froze, pushed the drain hose off, but
had thawed just enough for the pump to be unblocked when we next used it.
Cue water everywhere...

These were commercial
washing machines and a factory conversion kit was used for the
changeover. Perhaps something like that is available for residential
machines.


I think the pump body's normally the lowest part of the plumbing in a
machine - maybe a tap can be put in there (or right at the base of the
drain hose) and a solenoid valve added to completely drain the
system when power's applied to it (a solenoid valve from the inlet on a
junk washer would work, I suspect).

Of course you would still need to drain
the inlet hoses, but it would not be too difficult to just disconnect
them.


I think in most basic systems the external hot/cold inlet hoses merge into
a single hose 'downstream' of the solenoid valves within the machine, and
water in the tub and the 'internal' inlet hose then sits at the same level
as in the drain hose - so in theory if there's nothing in the drain hose
the inlet hose within the machine should drain, too.

Yes, still need to drain the external inlet hose(s) of water (if that's
what you meant) - but that's a separate issue to emptying the machine
itself.

cheers

Jules

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Old September 20th 09, 07:18 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Keeping Washing Machine from Freezing

VaTreeFarmer wrote:
My Virginia tree farm near the Blue Ridge Parkway is remote and has no
grid power. I currently only work it on weekends. My agricultural well
is generator operated. I use large pressure storage tanks for the well
water, and the shed that encloses my well and tanks is 8' x 12' in
size. I want to put an older working washing machine in the well pump
shed, and use it to do cold water washes.

I am insulating the pump shed (at about 1500 ft elevation near Stuart,
VA) to ~R19. When freezing weather comes I pump the water out of the
well pressure tanks and above ground pipes to protect them from
freezing damages. My question is about the washing machine that I want
to keep in the same shed.

Can I use compressed air at the water intake hose to blow water out of
the washing machine for freezing weather storage? I heard that would
still leave water in the washer's drain trap, which could freeze and
rupture plumbing.

How might one 'winterize' a washing machine for possible freezing
temperatures? Could I use RV water tank antifreeze by pouring some in
the water intake while the machine is set to fill the wash drum, and
then by setting the machine to 'drain' so that the antifreeze would
occupy both fill and drain lines?

I realize already that this is an atypical location and usage for a
washing machine. Relocating the machine to an alternate location is
not an option for me. Thanks for any help folks may have on this
unusual query.


Most washing machines will gravity drain the water in the tub and in the
pump if you simply lower the drain hose down to floor level. Hopefully
you have a floor drain to make things simple. It *could* leave some
water in the pump, so attach a good wet/dry shop vac to the drain hose
to see if any more water comes out. You can not use the machine without
raising the drain hose again, all the water that goes in will just flow
right out again.

I would think so but not be certain if disconnecting the water inlet
hoses, then attempting to fill the machine with warm water should open
the valves and let most of the water out of that part of the machine.
Your idea of using compressed air to blow the water out at the same time
should do the trick. Be sure both the hot and cold water valve
solenoids are energized and open when you use the compressed air.


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