Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 231
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

I apologize if part of this seems off topic but I thought that the electronic component of it might be on. I have this 3.5 horse engine on my old push mower. The engine is about 38 years old now but the mower is used very infrequently so the hours are not that bad. About 5 or 6 years ago I replaced the old OEM coil that used points, with a used newer electronic type that eliminates the points. The mower is on it's third carburetor, gas tank and second deck but it has always started ok. I tried to start the mower this morning and as sure as my wife said, (I hate it when she's right), "You'll never start that old thing", it wouldn't start. Long story short there is no HV spark to the plug. It seems as though the coil is bad again. I was going to hit up a few used lawnmower places to try to get a replacement coil because I have no engine numbers on my machine to look up the part but I was wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to bench test these things. Thanks for any help Lenny
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Friday, 25 May 2018 16:08:10 UTC+1, wrote:

I apologize if part of this seems off topic but I thought that the electronic component of it might be on. I have this 3.5 horse engine on my old push mower. The engine is about 38 years old now but the mower is used very infrequently so the hours are not that bad. About 5 or 6 years ago I replaced the old OEM coil that used points, with a used newer electronic type that eliminates the points. The mower is on it's third carburetor, gas tank and second deck but it has always started ok. I tried to start the mower this morning and as sure as my wife said, (I hate it when she's right), "You'll never start that old thing", it wouldn't start. Long story short there is no HV spark to the plug. It seems as though the coil is bad again. I was going to hit up a few used lawnmower places to try to get a replacement coil because I have no engine numbers on my machine to look up the part but I was wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to bench test these things. Thanks for any help Lenny


shouldn't be hard to continuity test the coil LT & HT sides. You have a multimeter?

Beware, connecting & disconnecting the meter on the LT side can cause a spark on the HT side.


NT
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,625
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 11:08:10 AM UTC-4, wrote:
I apologize if part of this seems off topic but I thought that the electronic component of it might be on. I have this 3.5 horse engine on my old push mower. The engine is about 38 years old now but the mower is used very infrequently so the hours are not that bad. About 5 or 6 years ago I replaced the old OEM coil that used points, with a used newer electronic type that eliminates the points. The mower is on it's third carburetor, gas tank and second deck but it has always started ok. I tried to start the mower this morning and as sure as my wife said, (I hate it when she's right), "You'll never start that old thing", it wouldn't start. Long story short there is no HV spark to the plug. It seems as though the coil is bad again. I was going to hit up a few used lawnmower places to try to get a replacement coil because I have no engine numbers on my machine to look up the part but I was wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to bench test these things. Thanks for any help Lenny


I admire your avoidance of landfill! If all else fails, go electric, they have come a long way since the flip-over B&Ds back in the day. But! Look for corrosion around any connections, and look for a bad spark-plug wire, carbon tracks or similar. Otherwise, these coils have a limited life in that application.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
  #5   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,163
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Fri, 25 May 2018 08:08:06 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

I apologize if part of this seems off topic but I thought that the electronic component of it might be on. I have this 3.5 horse engine on my old push mower. The engine is about 38 years old now but the mower is used very infrequently so the hours are not that bad. About 5 or 6 years ago I replaced the old OEM coil that used points, with a used newer electronic type that eliminates the points. The mower is on it's third carburetor, gas tank and second deck but it has always started ok. I tried to start the mower this morning and as sure as my wife said, (I hate it when she's right), "You'll never start that old thing", it wouldn't start. Long story short there is no HV spark to the plug. It seems as though the coil is bad again. I was going to hit up a few used lawnmower places to try to get a replacement coil because I have no engine numbers on my machine to look up the part but I was wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to bench test these things. Thanks for any help Lenny

There were a lot of Briggs and Stratton electronic type magnetos that
were prone to failure. I use a method to test suspect magnetos before
I spend much time trying to find out why there is no spark. Remove the
spark plug from the engine so that it turns over easily. Then stuff a
rod or something similar into the the spark plug boot so that it makes
good contact with the end of the spark plug wire. Now turn the engine
over slowly while holding the rod. You should get at least a tingle.
If no tingle then try turning the engine over a little faster. If
there is a little tingle then the problem is most likely a bad
connection. This could be a corroded ground wire. If, even turning
the engine over fairly fast, there isn't even a tingle the magneto is
bad or the kill wire is grounded. I have used this method for years
and it is a really fast way to find out if the mag is probably good or
not.
Eric


  #6   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Saturday, 26 May 2018 02:06:45 UTC+1, wrote:

There were a lot of Briggs and Stratton electronic type magnetos that
were prone to failure. I use a method to test suspect magnetos before
I spend much time trying to find out why there is no spark. Remove the
spark plug from the engine so that it turns over easily. Then stuff a
rod or something similar into the the spark plug boot so that it makes
good contact with the end of the spark plug wire. Now turn the engine
over slowly while holding the rod. You should get at least a tingle.
If no tingle then try turning the engine over a little faster. If
there is a little tingle then the problem is most likely a bad
connection. This could be a corroded ground wire. If, even turning
the engine over fairly fast, there isn't even a tingle the magneto is
bad or the kill wire is grounded. I have used this method for years
and it is a really fast way to find out if the mag is probably good or
not.
Eric


say hi to Darwin for me.
  #9   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 446
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 12:51:13 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Fri, 25 May 2018 18:28:53 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Saturday, 26 May 2018 02:06:45 UTC+1, wrote:

There were a lot of Briggs and Stratton electronic type magnetos that
were prone to failure. I use a method to test suspect magnetos before
I spend much time trying to find out why there is no spark. Remove the
spark plug from the engine so that it turns over easily. Then stuff a
rod or something similar into the the spark plug boot so that it makes
good contact with the end of the spark plug wire. Now turn the engine
over slowly while holding the rod. You should get at least a tingle.
If no tingle then try turning the engine over a little faster. If
there is a little tingle then the problem is most likely a bad
connection. This could be a corroded ground wire. If, even turning
the engine over fairly fast, there isn't even a tingle the magneto is
bad or the kill wire is grounded. I have used this method for years
and it is a really fast way to find out if the mag is probably good or
not.
Eric


say hi to Darwin for me.

Oh phooey. There is no way you can get a dangerous shock from slowly
turning over an old lawnmower engine equipped with a magneto. Sheeesh!
Eric


Exactly, on a small magneto like this it'll tickle, but this reminds me of a true story:

Many many years ago, a guy I knew was having some ignition work done on his stock Hemi Challenger at my buddy's garage, and brought along a magneto to try just in case. Just rotating it a half turn sent him flying! Those things have balls.
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,163
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Sat, 26 May 2018 10:38:17 -0700 (PDT), John-Del
wrote:

On Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 12:51:13 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Fri, 25 May 2018 18:28:53 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Saturday, 26 May 2018 02:06:45 UTC+1, wrote:

There were a lot of Briggs and Stratton electronic type magnetos that
were prone to failure. I use a method to test suspect magnetos before
I spend much time trying to find out why there is no spark. Remove the
spark plug from the engine so that it turns over easily. Then stuff a
rod or something similar into the the spark plug boot so that it makes
good contact with the end of the spark plug wire. Now turn the engine
over slowly while holding the rod. You should get at least a tingle.
If no tingle then try turning the engine over a little faster. If
there is a little tingle then the problem is most likely a bad
connection. This could be a corroded ground wire. If, even turning
the engine over fairly fast, there isn't even a tingle the magneto is
bad or the kill wire is grounded. I have used this method for years
and it is a really fast way to find out if the mag is probably good or
not.
Eric

say hi to Darwin for me.

Oh phooey. There is no way you can get a dangerous shock from slowly
turning over an old lawnmower engine equipped with a magneto. Sheeesh!
Eric


Exactly, on a small magneto like this it'll tickle, but this reminds me of a true story:

Many many years ago, a guy I knew was having some ignition work done on his stock Hemi Challenger at my buddy's garage, and brought along a magneto to try just in case. Just rotating it a half turn sent him flying! Those things have balls.

Was the mag the type that winds up when being turned over slowly? I
have some old magnetos that work this way. One is on my 1945 Gibson
tractor. When turned slowly it winds up a spring inside that lets go
when it reaches a certain tension, thereby spinning the magnet fast
enough to get a good spark. Those mags will deliver a really good
shock. Years ago I had one of these that would only deliver a little
tingle. Talking to a guy who knew about mags said that the coil may
have absorbed moisture over time, especially since the mag was from a
marine engine. He suggested baking the mag in oven at 200 degrees for
several hours and then letting it cool in the oven. I tried his
suggestion but was dubious. After it was cool I grabbed the spark plug
wire and turned the mag over. When it let go I got a really good
shock. Made my arm ache.
Eric


  #11   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 907
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On 2018/05/26 10:38 AM, John-Del wrote:
On Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 12:51:13 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Fri, 25 May 2018 18:28:53 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Saturday, 26 May 2018 02:06:45 UTC+1, wrote:

There were a lot of Briggs and Stratton electronic type magnetos that
were prone to failure. I use a method to test suspect magnetos before
I spend much time trying to find out why there is no spark. Remove the
spark plug from the engine so that it turns over easily. Then stuff a
rod or something similar into the the spark plug boot so that it makes
good contact with the end of the spark plug wire. Now turn the engine
over slowly while holding the rod. You should get at least a tingle.
If no tingle then try turning the engine over a little faster. If
there is a little tingle then the problem is most likely a bad
connection. This could be a corroded ground wire. If, even turning
the engine over fairly fast, there isn't even a tingle the magneto is
bad or the kill wire is grounded. I have used this method for years
and it is a really fast way to find out if the mag is probably good or
not.
Eric

say hi to Darwin for me.

Oh phooey. There is no way you can get a dangerous shock from slowly
turning over an old lawnmower engine equipped with a magneto. Sheeesh!
Eric


Exactly, on a small magneto like this it'll tickle, but this reminds me of a true story:

Many many years ago, a guy I knew was having some ignition work done on his stock Hemi Challenger at my buddy's garage, and brought along a magneto to try just in case. Just rotating it a half turn sent him flying! Those things have balls.


Magnetos were used as torture devices by the Nazis and other
unscrupulous folks and guess where they were hooked up...

John :-#(#
  #12   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 446
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 1:52:31 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 26 May 2018 10:38:17 -0700 (PDT), John-Del
wrote:

On Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 12:51:13 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Fri, 25 May 2018 18:28:53 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Saturday, 26 May 2018 02:06:45 UTC+1, wrote:

There were a lot of Briggs and Stratton electronic type magnetos that
were prone to failure. I use a method to test suspect magnetos before
I spend much time trying to find out why there is no spark. Remove the
spark plug from the engine so that it turns over easily. Then stuff a
rod or something similar into the the spark plug boot so that it makes
good contact with the end of the spark plug wire. Now turn the engine
over slowly while holding the rod. You should get at least a tingle.
If no tingle then try turning the engine over a little faster. If
there is a little tingle then the problem is most likely a bad
connection. This could be a corroded ground wire. If, even turning
the engine over fairly fast, there isn't even a tingle the magneto is
bad or the kill wire is grounded. I have used this method for years
and it is a really fast way to find out if the mag is probably good or
not.
Eric

say hi to Darwin for me.
Oh phooey. There is no way you can get a dangerous shock from slowly
turning over an old lawnmower engine equipped with a magneto. Sheeesh!
Eric


Exactly, on a small magneto like this it'll tickle, but this reminds me of a true story:

Many many years ago, a guy I knew was having some ignition work done on his stock Hemi Challenger at my buddy's garage, and brought along a magneto to try just in case. Just rotating it a half turn sent him flying! Those things have balls.

Was the mag the type that winds up when being turned over slowly? I
have some old magnetos that work this way. One is on my 1945 Gibson
tractor. When turned slowly it winds up a spring inside that lets go
when it reaches a certain tension, thereby spinning the magnet fast
enough to get a good spark. Those mags will deliver a really good
shock. Years ago I had one of these that would only deliver a little
tingle. Talking to a guy who knew about mags said that the coil may
have absorbed moisture over time, especially since the mag was from a
marine engine. He suggested baking the mag in oven at 200 degrees for
several hours and then letting it cool in the oven. I tried his
suggestion but was dubious. After it was cool I grabbed the spark plug
wire and turned the mag over. When it let go I got a really good
shock. Made my arm ache.
Eric


No, just the type they used in race engines. Something like this:

http://www.westracingproducts.com/MS...-V8_p_981.html
  #13   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,163
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Sat, 26 May 2018 14:06:36 -0700 (PDT), John-Del
wrote:

On Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 1:52:31 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 26 May 2018 10:38:17 -0700 (PDT), John-Del
wrote:

On Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 12:51:13 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Fri, 25 May 2018 18:28:53 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Saturday, 26 May 2018 02:06:45 UTC+1, wrote:

There were a lot of Briggs and Stratton electronic type magnetos that
were prone to failure. I use a method to test suspect magnetos before
I spend much time trying to find out why there is no spark. Remove the
spark plug from the engine so that it turns over easily. Then stuff a
rod or something similar into the the spark plug boot so that it makes
good contact with the end of the spark plug wire. Now turn the engine
over slowly while holding the rod. You should get at least a tingle.
If no tingle then try turning the engine over a little faster. If
there is a little tingle then the problem is most likely a bad
connection. This could be a corroded ground wire. If, even turning
the engine over fairly fast, there isn't even a tingle the magneto is
bad or the kill wire is grounded. I have used this method for years
and it is a really fast way to find out if the mag is probably good or
not.
Eric

say hi to Darwin for me.
Oh phooey. There is no way you can get a dangerous shock from slowly
turning over an old lawnmower engine equipped with a magneto. Sheeesh!
Eric

Exactly, on a small magneto like this it'll tickle, but this reminds me of a true story:

Many many years ago, a guy I knew was having some ignition work done on his stock Hemi Challenger at my buddy's garage, and brought along a magneto to try just in case. Just rotating it a half turn sent him flying! Those things have balls.

Was the mag the type that winds up when being turned over slowly? I
have some old magnetos that work this way. One is on my 1945 Gibson
tractor. When turned slowly it winds up a spring inside that lets go
when it reaches a certain tension, thereby spinning the magnet fast
enough to get a good spark. Those mags will deliver a really good
shock. Years ago I had one of these that would only deliver a little
tingle. Talking to a guy who knew about mags said that the coil may
have absorbed moisture over time, especially since the mag was from a
marine engine. He suggested baking the mag in oven at 200 degrees for
several hours and then letting it cool in the oven. I tried his
suggestion but was dubious. After it was cool I grabbed the spark plug
wire and turned the mag over. When it let go I got a really good
shock. Made my arm ache.
Eric


No, just the type they used in race engines. Something like this:

http://www.westracingproducts.com/MS...-V8_p_981.html

They must have some pretty strong magnets and the voltage at operating
RPM must be VERY high. I guess that's what is needed for really high
compression engines.
Eric
  #15   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 633
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On 5/26/18 5:52 PM, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
At one time, I had a '55 Chevy 2-door sedan.
With a 437 cu in big block,Hilborn fuel injection


Typo, 427

--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com


  #16   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 231
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 11:08:10 AM UTC-4, wrote:
I apologize if part of this seems off topic but I thought that the electronic component of it might be on. I have this 3.5 horse engine on my old push mower. The engine is about 38 years old now but the mower is used very infrequently so the hours are not that bad. About 5 or 6 years ago I replaced the old OEM coil that used points, with a used newer electronic type that eliminates the points. The mower is on it's third carburetor, gas tank and second deck but it has always started ok. I tried to start the mower this morning and as sure as my wife said, (I hate it when she's right), "You'll never start that old thing", it wouldn't start. Long story short there is no HV spark to the plug. It seems as though the coil is bad again. I was going to hit up a few used lawnmower places to try to get a replacement coil because I have no engine numbers on my machine to look up the part but I was wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to bench test these things. Thanks for any help Lenny


I understand the value of "object lessons". I have 5 grandchildren.
But why in God's name would you let someone **** on your engine?
Lenny
  #18   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 446
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Sunday, May 27, 2018 at 1:31:50 PM UTC-4, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 5/27/18 8:57 AM, wrote:
I understand the value of "object lessons". I have 5 grandchildren.
But why in God's name would you let someone **** on your engine?
Lenny


Because 1. it was worth $100 and 2. It was funnier than Hell.



LOL! The only shame is that you didn't video record it.
  #20   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 633
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

Just a random thought.

I used to work as a mechanic at a small engine repair shop.
One of the cartoons that found a home on the front counter:

A kid sitting in the driveway with the lawn mower totally
disassembled. And his dad standing there looking at him.
"I found the problem. It's out of gas."



--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com


  #21   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,045
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Mon, 28 May 2018 11:07:16 -0500, Fox's Mercantile
wrote:

Just a random thought.

I used to work as a mechanic at a small engine repair shop.
One of the cartoons that found a home on the front counter:

A kid sitting in the driveway with the lawn mower totally
disassembled. And his dad standing there looking at him.
"I found the problem. It's out of gas."


The caption should have been "You're paying me how much to fix this"?

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #22   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,625
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

The question remains - did you ever get the beast running again?

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
  #24   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 140
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem



Too funny. At least Darwin went right for the reproductive organs. Fastest route to stopping the genetic defects.
  #25   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,625
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Tuesday, May 29, 2018 at 11:16:21 AM UTC-4, Terry Schwartz wrote:
Too funny. At least Darwin went right for the reproductive organs. Fastest route to stopping the genetic defects.


Leaving the most important question, from The Lancet, April 1, 1960-something:

Is Sterility Hereditary?

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


  #26   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 231
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 11:08:10 AM UTC-4, wrote:
I apologize if part of this seems off topic but I thought that the electronic component of it might be on. I have this 3.5 horse engine on my old push mower. The engine is about 38 years old now but the mower is used very infrequently so the hours are not that bad. About 5 or 6 years ago I replaced the old OEM coil that used points, with a used newer electronic type that eliminates the points. The mower is on it's third carburetor, gas tank and second deck but it has always started ok. I tried to start the mower this morning and as sure as my wife said, (I hate it when she's right), "You'll never start that old thing", it wouldn't start. Long story short there is no HV spark to the plug. It seems as though the coil is bad again. I was going to hit up a few used lawnmower places to try to get a replacement coil because I have no engine numbers on my machine to look up the part but I was wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to bench test these things. Thanks for any help Lenny


nope haven't gotten it working yet. Need to find a lawnmower graveyard
for a coil.Lenny
  #27   Report Post  
Posted to sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 231
Default Briggs and Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower engine problem

On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 11:08:10 AM UTC-4, wrote:
I apologize if part of this seems off topic but I thought that the electronic component of it might be on. I have this 3.5 horse engine on my old push mower. The engine is about 38 years old now but the mower is used very infrequently so the hours are not that bad. About 5 or 6 years ago I replaced the old OEM coil that used points, with a used newer electronic type that eliminates the points. The mower is on it's third carburetor, gas tank and second deck but it has always started ok. I tried to start the mower this morning and as sure as my wife said, (I hate it when she's right), "You'll never start that old thing", it wouldn't start. Long story short there is no HV spark to the plug. It seems as though the coil is bad again. I was going to hit up a few used lawnmower places to try to get a replacement coil because I have no engine numbers on my machine to look up the part but I was wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to bench test these things. Thanks for any help Lenny


nope haven't gotten it working yet. Need to find a lawnmower graveyard
for a coil.Lenny
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Briggs and Stratton Engine Problem jamesgangnc[_3_] Home Repair 19 July 7th 11 03:35 PM
Briggs and Stratton Engine Problem [email protected] Home Repair 0 July 5th 11 04:21 PM
Briggs and Stratton Engine Problem dpb Home Repair 0 July 5th 11 02:38 PM
Hard starting Briggs & Stratton 3.0 hp lawnmower engine muzician21 Home Repair 43 June 5th 09 06:41 PM
Hard starting Briggs & Stratton 3.0 hp lawnmower engine muzician21 Home Ownership 43 June 5th 09 06:41 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:49 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"