Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Default AWG

Increasing gauge numbers denote decreasing wire diameters, which is
similar to many other non-metric gauging systems such as British
Standard Wire Gauge (SWG), but unlike IEC 60228, the metric wire-size
standard used in most parts of the world.


This gauge system originated in the number of drawing operations used to
produce a given gauge of wire. Very fine wire (for example, 30 gauge)
required more passes through the drawing dies than 0 gauge wire did.
Manufacturers of wire formerly had proprietary wire gauge systems; the
development of standardized wire gauges rationalized selection of wire
for a particular purpose. -- Wikip

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Default AWG

On Friday, February 9, 2018 at 2:00:26 AM UTC-5, micky wrote:
Increasing gauge numbers denote decreasing wire diameters, which is
similar to many other non-metric gauging systems such as British
Standard Wire Gauge (SWG), but unlike IEC 60228, the metric wire-size
standard used in most parts of the world.


This gauge system originated in the number of drawing operations used to
produce a given gauge of wire. Very fine wire (for example, 30 gauge)
required more passes through the drawing dies than 0 gauge wire did.
Manufacturers of wire formerly had proprietary wire gauge systems; the
development of standardized wire gauges rationalized selection of wire
for a particular purpose. -- Wikip

Did all know this?


A-merican W-ire G-auge

Somewhere between Caliber (which is fractions of an inch) and arbitrary convention. Once upon a time, wire was measured in fractions-of-whatever, much as railway timetables were arbitrary and based on local time. After a large number of crashes, railroads created a convention which is now GMT.

And, US wire manufacturers adopted a similar convention so as to be able to sell products beyond their back yards - somewhere just before the Civil War as I remember - mid 1850s or so.

https://www.rapidtables.com/calc/wir...uge-chart.html

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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