Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Default ATX power supply to bench supply conversion

Hello,

Not sure if this is the best group for this. I found several articles
on the process of using an ATX power supply and convert it to a bench
supply. The problem I am having is that the wire color codes and pin
outs are not standard ATX. I looked several places, including this
website, to see if I could find out what the pin outs would be.

It is a LiteOn 140W PSU with +/-5V, +/-12V, +18V, and +5V standby
(underside of the PSU). I actually had to open it to see what wires
were what voltage. The board actually has them listed as:

6 Red: +5V
5 Black: Ground
1 White: +18V
1 Yellow: -12V
1 Purple: -5V
1 Grey: PG, I am guessing 'Power Good'
1 Orange: +12V
2 Brown: P/C and F/C (not sure what these are supposed to be)

The pinouts from 1 to 20 a

Red
Black
Red
Black
Grey
Red
Orange
Yellow
BLANK
White
Brown
Black
Black
Black
Purple
Red
Red
Red
Brown
BLANK

Any ideas? I am out of them. Thanks in advance.

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Default ATX power supply to bench supply conversion

On Apr 2, 1:11 am, Lionel wrote:


Um. What's your actual question? Your colour coding looks correct at a
glance, so you know which voltages should be on which wires. As you
guessed, PG = "power good", so all you need to do it short the grey
wire to a black wire (you can use a 1K resistor if you're feeling
paranoid), & the it'll power up just fine. I have a couple of PC PSUs
set up the same way on my own bench.

--
W "Some people are alive only because it is illegal to kill them."
. | ,. w ,
\|/ \|/ Perna condita delenda est
---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I guess it is ok; however, every single site I go to does not show
this pin out or color coding for an ATX power supply. Real quick,
Blue is -12V on every site that I have seen...among others.

The question I really wanted to ask concerned the brown wires. Not
sure what they are supposed to be. The board says P/C and F/C. If
shorting the grey wire to ground is all I need to do, I will set that
up and just measure them with a Fluke.

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Default ATX power supply to bench supply conversion

On 1 Apr 2007 21:24:54 -0700, "Kingcosmos"
put finger to keyboard and composed:

Hello,

Not sure if this is the best group for this. I found several articles
on the process of using an ATX power supply and convert it to a bench
supply. The problem I am having is that the wire color codes and pin
outs are not standard ATX. I looked several places, including this
website, to see if I could find out what the pin outs would be.

It is a LiteOn 140W PSU with +/-5V, +/-12V, +18V, and +5V standby
(underside of the PSU). I actually had to open it to see what wires
were what voltage. The board actually has them listed as:

6 Red: +5V
5 Black: Ground
1 White: +18V


+18V is not a standard ATX voltage. Furthermore, the LiteOn has no
+3.3V rail. Could this supply be for an industrial PC ???

1 Yellow: -12V
1 Purple: -5V
1 Grey: PG, I am guessing 'Power Good'
1 Orange: +12V
2 Brown: P/C and F/C (not sure what these are supposed to be)


Power/Control ??? Fan/Control ???

- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.
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Default ATX power supply to bench supply conversion

Success!

The grey wire appears to be power good so that should be an output. I
connected the only +5V coming up (which I think is the standby
voltage) to the brown wire P/C (I agree-- power control), and the rest
of the rails came up.

Everything looks good. Still not sure about what the supply actually
is.

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Default ATX power supply to bench supply conversion

On 3 Apr 2007 18:00:14 -0700, "Kingcosmos"
put finger to keyboard and composed:

Success!

The grey wire appears to be power good so that should be an output. I
connected the only +5V coming up (which I think is the standby
voltage) to the brown wire P/C (I agree-- power control), and the rest
of the rails came up.


In a regular ATX PSU, the PS_ON pin is shorted to ground to turn on
the supply.

Everything looks good. Still not sure about what the supply actually
is.


Could the 1-wire 18V rail be for an LCD panel or touch screen ???
Point of Sale system ???

- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.


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Default ATX power supply to bench supply conversion

On Tue, 03 Apr 2007 17:31:31 -0400 Meat Plow wrote
in Message id: :

A 140 watt supply in an industrial PC?


Sure! We ship industrial nema-4 systems with even less power. 50-80 watt
power supplies and mobile processors.
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