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Substitute for Red Devil lye?



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 29th 06, 10:36 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?

Hi Wes:

I just went to my local Ace this morning. I was told that Ace no
longer carries Red Devil lye because it is used in the manufacture of
methamphetamine. I guess that's why I can't find it anywhere.


Wes Stewart wrote:
On 29 Jun 2006 08:52:38 -0700, "the_tool_man"
wrote:

Hi all:

I'm gearing up for my first major project with cherry. An associate of
mine recommended using a lye solution to darken the wood. After some
research, I'd like to try it. However, I've found that Red Devil lye
is no longer sold locally. I've found a few leads through candlemaking
websites, but they require me to purchase 30lb of the stuff. I just
want a little to experiment with. Are there any other brands to look
for? My local searches have yeilded nothing that is pure sodium
hydroxide, and I'm reluctant to use anything that has "other stuff" in
it. Any help would be appreciated.


I've bought it at Ace Hardware.


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  #12  
Old June 29th 06, 10:40 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?

Hi Dhakala:

By lye, I mean sodium hydroxide. Potassium hydroxide is a.k.a. Potash
Lye. They are two different things, but with sorta the same name. The
question is, does it produce the same effect as "regular" lye. I ask,
because I think Potassium hydoxide is used as a pH modifier in spa
chemicals, which I can get in reasonable quantities.

Dhakala wrote:
the_tool_man wrote:
Anybody used potassium hydroxide?

Thanks again for any help!

Regards,
John.


That's why lye is, John. You can make it at home. This recipe is rather
elaborate, for producing significant quantities. But I'm sure you can
scale it down and simplify it. The basic idea is to pour soft water
over hardwood ashes. N. B.: don't use any metal containers!

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Lye


  #13  
Old June 29th 06, 11:18 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?

On 29 Jun 2006 14:36:25 -0700, "the_tool_man"
wrote:

Hi Wes:

I just went to my local Ace this morning. I was told that Ace no
longer carries Red Devil lye because it is used in the manufacture of
methamphetamine. I guess that's why I can't find it anywhere.


Crap. I use it for cleaing/etching aluminum. Glad I still have about
4 cans in stock.


  #14  
Old June 30th 06, 01:36 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?


... I've found that Red Devil lye is no longer sold locally. ... My local searches have yeilded nothing that is pure sodium hydroxide, and I'm reluctant to use anything that has "other stuff" in it.


You don't need pure "sodium hydroxide". In a pinch you can use Easy-Off
oven cleaner or Drano. Both contain lye.

  #15  
Old June 30th 06, 01:36 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?


... I've found that Red Devil lye is no longer sold locally. ... My local searches have yeilded nothing that is pure sodium hydroxide, and I'm reluctant to use anything that has "other stuff" in it.


You don't need pure "sodium hydroxide". In a pinch you can use Easy-Off
oven cleaner or Drano. Both contain lye.

  #17  
Old June 30th 06, 03:26 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?

the_tool_man wrote:


By lye, I mean sodium hydroxide.


AKA: "caustic".

Almost every paint stripper uses it as the muscle to soften paint.

Does a great job of eating wood fibers.

BTW, have a couple of customers with 10,000 gallon tanks of 50%
caustic, but that doesn't help much.

It is used to make detergents as well as paint stripper.

Lew
  #18  
Old June 30th 06, 03:46 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?

http://www.chemistrystore.com/Sodium_Hydroxide.htm

$10 for 2#, $67 for 25# ships UPS in the continental US.
  #19  
Old June 30th 06, 04:04 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?

"the_tool_man" wrote...
By lye, I mean sodium hydroxide.



Part A of a two step wood bleach, such as Klean-Strip brand, is sodium
hydroxide. Part B is Hydrogen Peroxide.

This stuff works great for bleaching walnut, but does not give a uniform
effect on cherry, IMO. Also, the lye component damages the wood fibers.
Lye is also used for making wood pulp for paper, IIRC.

You say this is your first project in cherry - putting lye on it seems like
a pretty drastic step. Most people really like cherry as-is, and it can be
dyed and/or stained for some really nice effects. Also, there is a simple
trick for darkening cherry that doesnt require any harsh chemicals. Just
put your completed but unfinished piece in the sun for a few days. It will
darken up very quickly.




--
Timothy Juvenal
www.rude-tone.com/work.htm


  #20  
Old June 30th 06, 04:46 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Substitute for Red Devil lye?


Doug Miller wrote:
In article . com, "Dhakala" wrote:

Dhakala wrote:
the_tool_man wrote:
Anybody used potassium hydroxide?

Thanks again for any help!

Regards,
John.

That's why lye is, John.


"What lye is," I meant.


But that's *not* what lye is. Lye is sodium hydroxide.


It can be either. The lye made from ashes is potash lye, potassium
hydroxide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lye

 




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