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Heatproofing the wall behind wood burning stove



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 20th 05, 01:11 PM
Simon Langford
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Default Heatproofing the wall behind wood burning stove

Hi,

I've recently had a 3-11 kW woodburning stove installed in our kitchen.
It's basically free-standing with a flue going up next to the wall and
out through the roof. The back of the stove is probably only about
3"-4" away from the wall, and the plaster on the wall has started to
crack quite badly. When you tap it, it sounds a bit loose and hollow.

The stove was installed very recently (end of November) and the
installer said it might need some heatproofing, but we "could always do
that later if needed".

So now I'm thinking we'll need to do something before the wall crumbles
and comes away - is that likely to happen? If I put some tiles on the
wall will that stop the problem? Do I need special tiles, or special
adhesive/grout?

I'm hoping I won't have to take the existing plaster off and start
again. The installers are coming back again this week to fix the
leaning chimney and do a better job of the bodge they made where the
flue goes through the ceiling. Can I get them to fix it as part of the
original job on the grounds that they should have known that the plaster
would crack?

Sorry if a similar question has been asked before -- I did search with
google for similar problems...

Thanks,

Simon.
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  #2  
Old January 20th 05, 01:18 PM
The Natural Philosopher
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Simon Langford wrote:

Hi,

I've recently had a 3-11 kW woodburning stove installed in our kitchen.
It's basically free-standing with a flue going up next to the wall and
out through the roof. The back of the stove is probably only about
3"-4" away from the wall, and the plaster on the wall has started to
crack quite badly. When you tap it, it sounds a bit loose and hollow.

The stove was installed very recently (end of November) and the
installer said it might need some heatproofing, but we "could always do
that later if needed".

So now I'm thinking we'll need to do something before the wall crumbles
and comes away - is that likely to happen? If I put some tiles on the
wall will that stop the problem? Do I need special tiles, or special
adhesive/grout?

I'm hoping I won't have to take the existing plaster off and start
again. The installers are coming back again this week to fix the
leaning chimney and do a better job of the bodge they made where the
flue goes through the ceiling. Can I get them to fix it as part of the
original job on the grounds that they should have known that the plaster
would crack?

Sorry if a similar question has been asked before -- I did search with
google for similar problems...

Thanks,

Simon.



Th easy route is to whack up some heatproof board - asbestos replacement
stuff. Gypsum and glass strand. Multiboard and masterboard are two names
that come to mind.

If you paint it, it will need to be heatproof paint.

Other possibilites are tiles and metal sheets or plates.

At least you don;t have opne gartes ti cintend with - we've just split
an expesniove cast iron fireback from bottom to top due to thermal
stresses..

  #3  
Old January 20th 05, 01:29 PM
keng
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You ask what 'you' can do to fix it. Don't even go down that road. It
is not what 'you' can do but what 'they' should have done in the first
place.

You state they are coming back to fix a "bodge" then include everything
that has been bodged.

If they are "installers" then it should have been installed properly.
Your contract (can be written or verbal) with them has not been
fulfilled until they carry out their part of the agreement.
I just hope you haven't paid for the 'bodge'.

  #4  
Old January 20th 05, 01:51 PM
[email protected]
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Probably a bit too near the wall.
I did mine by adding a brick back panel about 700mm wide, floor to
ceiling with 25mm kingspan behind, the brickwork tied as per cavity
wall but with more ties as there is no edge constraint or corner. Am
thinking of painting the brickwork - any suggestions for heat resistant
paint?

cheers

Jacob

  #5  
Old January 20th 05, 02:24 PM
[email protected]
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Default

On 20 Jan 2005 05:29:31 -0800, "keng" wrote:

You ask what 'you' can do to fix it. Don't even go down that road. It
is not what 'you' can do but what 'they' should have done in the first
place.

You state they are coming back to fix a "bodge" then include everything
that has been bodged.

If they are "installers" then it should have been installed properly.
Your contract (can be written or verbal) with them has not been
fulfilled until they carry out their part of the agreement.
I just hope you haven't paid for the 'bodge'.


It's also worth pointing out that this sort of installation requires
building regs approval. Professional installers have the option of a
self registration get out along the lines of Fensa double glaziers and
Part P for electricians. The building regs covers distance from walls
and suitability of materials. Sounds as if your fitter either wasn't
registered, or if he was he shouldn't have been!

Bill
  #7  
Old January 21st 05, 11:37 AM
Pete C
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Default

On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 13:11:49 GMT, Simon Langford
wrote:

Hi,

I've recently had a 3-11 kW woodburning stove installed in our kitchen.
It's basically free-standing with a flue going up next to the wall and
out through the roof. The back of the stove is probably only about
3"-4" away from the wall, and the plaster on the wall has started to
crack quite badly. When you tap it, it sounds a bit loose and hollow.

The stove was installed very recently (end of November) and the
installer said it might need some heatproofing, but we "could always do
that later if needed".


Hi,

A good way is with some cement board, sheet of metal, or similar with
a 1" air gap behind and well ventilated at top and bottom. Some foil
stapled or glued on both sides of the gap would help.

The advantage with cement board is that it can be tiled easily if
desired.

cheers,
Pete.

Or a sheet of aluminium



So now I'm thinking we'll need to do something before the wall crumbles
and comes away - is that likely to happen? If I put some tiles on the
wall will that stop the problem? Do I need special tiles, or special
adhesive/grout?

I'm hoping I won't have to take the existing plaster off and start
again. The installers are coming back again this week to fix the
leaning chimney and do a better job of the bodge they made where the
flue goes through the ceiling. Can I get them to fix it as part of the
original job on the grounds that they should have known that the plaster
would crack?

Sorry if a similar question has been asked before -- I did search with
google for similar problems...

Thanks,

Simon.


  #8  
Old January 22nd 05, 01:04 PM
lyn rivers
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We've just done the same, and were advised by the stove suppliers that
the stove should either:
(a) be positioned 3 x the diameter of the flue pipe from the wall
behind
or
(b) the wall behind must be made from heatproof materials.

In our case we got the builder to use the heatproof plasterboard
mentioned in another reply. (Our stove is also freestanding.) Your
installers should know about this stuff, but it sounds like they've
made a bodge of so many aspects of the job that you must be able to
insist on them putting the whole lot right at no further cost...
Good luck :-)

Lyn

 




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