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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 14th 07, 10:20 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 4,255
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

For years I've had one of these - a woven fabric mat about 9" square
which I can place behind pipework which I'm soldering, to avoid setting
fire to the underlying fabric of the building or whatever.

As it is now very tatty, I included a replacement in a recent order from
Screwfix. There were two to choose from:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=A335589&ts=44202&id=20129
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=A335589&ts=44219&id=96228
costing 4 or 11 quid respectively - both are described as 'soldering
mats'; the only obvious difference being that the expensive one is
described as "professional quality".

I ordered the cheapo one, since from the picture it looks just the same
as my old one. But having unpacked it I find a label which states:

"Do not place this soldering mat onto surfaces which can be damaged by
heat, eg nylon carpets, painted surfaces. The intended purpose of using
this soldering mat is to prevent small drops of solder coming into
contact with other surfaces. It will not act as a heat barrier for much
larger items such as nozzles from gas torches"

So I'm puzzled. Is this warning for real, or is it just a disclaimer to
stop me from suing when my house burns down?.... is my new mat likely to
be just the same as the old one and can I carry on using it in the same
way?

Or is there a different mats which I should buy to use in this way? (I
note that Screwfix's dearer mat is still described as a 'soldering mat' BTW.

Thanks
David
Ads
  #2  
Old February 14th 07, 02:23 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 15,615
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

Lobster wrote:

I ordered the cheapo one, since from the picture it looks just the same
as my old one. But having unpacked it I find a label which states:

"Do not place this soldering mat onto surfaces which can be damaged by
heat, eg nylon carpets, painted surfaces. The intended purpose of using
this soldering mat is to prevent small drops of solder coming into
contact with other surfaces. It will not act as a heat barrier for much
larger items such as nozzles from gas torches"

So I'm puzzled. Is this warning for real, or is it just a disclaimer to
stop me from suing when my house burns down?.... is my new mat likely to
be just the same as the old one and can I carry on using it in the same
way?


How does it compare in construction to the old one? It will almost
certainly give some protection to the surrounding areas, but not being
padded like the posh one you will still get a significant temperature
rise behind it. I have managed to scorch things through the thin mats in
the past. The padded ones do control the temperature better.

Or is there a different mats which I should buy to use in this way? (I
note that Screwfix's dearer mat is still described as a 'soldering mat'
BTW.


The page title on the cheap one describes it as a drip mat rather than a
soldering mat.

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #3  
Old February 14th 07, 03:15 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5,162
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

On 14 Feb, 09:20, Lobster wrote:

the only obvious difference being


The first is just a drip mat. It's proof against solder, but it's not
going to insulate anything.

If you're using an electric iron, then a drip mat is adequate. If
you're using a gas flame or hot air, or if you're getting the
workpiece hot enough that radiant heat is a problem, then you need the
real thing.

Mine is a couple of layers of Kevlar, with an outer layer of Nomex
(worn-out fireproof boiler suit) on each side. The Kevlar is a loose
weave, so not flame proof.

  #4  
Old February 14th 07, 03:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 115
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?


"Lobster" wrote in message
...
For years I've had one of these - a woven fabric mat about 9" square
which I can place behind pipework which I'm soldering, to avoid setting
fire to the underlying fabric of the building or whatever.

As it is now very tatty, I included a replacement in a recent order from
Screwfix. There were two to choose from:

http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=A335589&ts=44202&id=20129

http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=A335589&ts=44219&id=96228
costing 4 or 11 quid respectively - both are described as 'soldering
mats'; the only obvious difference being that the expensive one is
described as "professional quality".

I ordered the cheapo one, since from the picture it looks just the same
as my old one. But having unpacked it I find a label which states:

"Do not place this soldering mat onto surfaces which can be damaged by
heat, eg nylon carpets, painted surfaces. The intended purpose of using
this soldering mat is to prevent small drops of solder coming into
contact with other surfaces. It will not act as a heat barrier for much
larger items such as nozzles from gas torches"

So I'm puzzled. Is this warning for real, or is it just a disclaimer to
stop me from suing when my house burns down?.... is my new mat likely to
be just the same as the old one and can I carry on using it in the same
way?

Or is there a different mats which I should buy to use in this way? (I
note that Screwfix's dearer mat is still described as a 'soldering mat'

BTW.

Thanks
David


Personally dont use mats,I prefer a sheet of tin the stuff thats normally
used to seal off the back of a gas fire.
This can get behind the pipe even if the pipe is very close to a wall
whereas the mat wont. ;-)


  #5  
Old February 14th 07, 11:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,231
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

On Wed, 14 Feb 2007 09:20:01 +0000, Lobster wrote:

For years I've had one of these - a woven fabric mat about 9" square
which I can place behind pipework which I'm soldering, to avoid setting
fire to the underlying fabric of the building or whatever.

As it is now very tatty, I included a replacement in a recent order from
Screwfix. There were two to choose from:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=A335589&ts=44202&id=20129
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=A335589&ts=44219&id=96228
costing 4 or 11 quid respectively - both are described as 'soldering
mats'; the only obvious difference being that the expensive one is
described as "professional quality".

I ordered the cheapo one, since from the picture it looks just the same
as my old one. But having unpacked it I find a label which states:

"Do not place this soldering mat onto surfaces which can be damaged by
heat, eg nylon carpets, painted surfaces. The intended purpose of using
this soldering mat is to prevent small drops of solder coming into
contact with other surfaces. It will not act as a heat barrier for much
larger items such as nozzles from gas torches"

So I'm puzzled. Is this warning for real, or is it just a disclaimer to
stop me from suing when my house burns down?.... is my new mat likely to
be just the same as the old one and can I carry on using it in the same
way?

Or is there a different mats which I should buy to use in this way? (I
note that Screwfix's dearer mat is still described as a 'soldering mat' BTW.

I have found no type of flexible matting which does the job, i.e. protect
what's behind from a moderate propane torch for soldering and last more
than a week.

I used use some traditional mid C20 fire resistant sheeting I picked up
from a site. Let's describe it as mineral fibre reinforced cement board
(may the reader understand what I mean). Eventually the small
pieces I had got broken/lost/excessively soiled. I have found that the
modern equivalent is also a fibre reinforced cement board and is called
Hardibacker it is intended to compete with Aqua-panel, offcuts of this are
excellent.


--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
Gas fitting FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
Sealed CH FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/SealedCH.html
Choosing a Boiler FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/BoilerChoice.html
Gas Fitting Standards Docs he http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFittingStandards
  #6  
Old February 15th 07, 12:13 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 8,323
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

Lobster wrote:

For years I've had one of these - a woven fabric mat about 9" square
which I can place behind pipework which I'm soldering, to avoid
setting fire to the underlying fabric of the building or whatever.

SNIP

Or is there a different mats which I should buy to use in this way?
(I note that Screwfix's dearer mat is still described as a
'soldering mat' BTW.


I bought the cheap one from Toolstation and it lasted for one job - bloody
rubbish. It looks about the same as the Screwfix one.

The Monument one is an entirely different piece of kit, about 5 times as
thick and of much denser material. Looks like you could launch a cruise
missile from it with no problem.

I always use a wet cloth under the soldering mat as well.



--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
01634 717930
07850 597257



  #7  
Old February 15th 07, 04:46 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,162
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

On 14 Feb, 22:10, Huge wrote:

BTW, Nomex and Kevlar are very closely related.


I've never really understood the distinction. Chemically they're quite
similar, yet mechanically they're significantly different. Kevlar has
bulk strength that Nomex doesn't (this is fairly obvious from the
simple behaviour of the fibres), yet only Nomex is available as fine-
weave fabrics where Kevlar isn't. Why is this? Why don't we have
fine-weave Kevlars, and use them for everything?

My Kevlar underwear is scratchy as hell, I can tell you!
(US Navy aviator issue, genuine usenet-rated flameproof longjohns.
Never enter talk.origins without them)

  #8  
Old February 16th 07, 11:11 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,990
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

On 15 Feb 2007 17:56:12 GMT, Huge wrote:

Kevlar macromolecules are
sterically hindered about the amide links between the aromatic
rings,


That's easy for you to say.

--
Frank Erskine
  #9  
Old February 16th 07, 11:27 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 255
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

In article ,
Frank Erskine wrote

On 15 Feb 2007 17:56:12 GMT, Huge wrote:
Kevlar macromolecules are sterically hindered about the amide
links between the aromatic rings,


That's easy for you to say.


Who last had the can of uk.d-i.y screen cleaner.

--
Tony Williams.
  #10  
Old February 16th 07, 12:42 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5,162
Default Flame-resistant protective mat for plumhing?

On 15 Feb, 17:56, Huge wrote:

The web page whose URL I gave explains. Kevlar macromolecules are
sterically hindered about the amide links between the aromatic
rings, whereas Nomex isn't. That affects the physical properties of
the resultant fibres and hence the cloth they're made into.


I understand the difference, I just don't understand why this means
that there's no fine-fibre Kevlar and thus no thin soft Kevlar cloth.

I suppose I ought to go and ask. Factory's only over the road...

 




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