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Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

R134a Thread size?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 14th 09, 03:06 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 4
Default R134a Thread size?

I want to recharge the refrigerant in my auto air conditioner. I've
assembled all the necessary tools except for one item. My vacuum pump
is outfitted with a 3/4" female NPT fitting and the discharge tube
from the gauge set is a R134a female fitting. I plan on machining an
adapter to get the 2 fittings connected to each other.

But I can't figure out what the thread size is on the R134a. Please
enlighten me!


Gary
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  #2  
Old June 14th 09, 05:56 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 4
Default R134a Thread size?


"BQ340" wrote in message
...
gary wrote:
I want to recharge the refrigerant in my auto air conditioner. I've
assembled all the necessary tools except for one item. My vacuum pump
is outfitted with a 3/4" female NPT fitting and the discharge tube
from the gauge set is a R134a female fitting. I plan on machining an
adapter to get the 2 fittings connected to each other.

But I can't figure out what the thread size is on the R134a. Please
enlighten me!


Gary



1/2" Acme as I recall but I don't remember the pitch, sorry!

MikeB


1/2" - 16 Acme according to this chart

http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/refrig.../fittlist.html


  #3  
Old June 15th 09, 02:01 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 428
Default R134a Thread size?

On Sun, 14 Jun 2009 10:35:18 -0400, BQ340
wrote:

gary wrote:
I want to recharge the refrigerant in my auto air conditioner. I've
assembled all the necessary tools except for one item. My vacuum pump
is outfitted with a 3/4" female NPT fitting and the discharge tube
from the gauge set is a R134a female fitting. I plan on machining an
adapter to get the 2 fittings connected to each other.

But I can't figure out what the thread size is on the R134a. Please
enlighten me!


1/2" Acme as I recall but I don't remember the pitch, sorry!


Don't reinvent the wheel by machining the fittings, it's silly to
waste $100 to $200 of your time on a $5 part - you only do that when
it's made out of pure Unobtanium... Go to any refrigeration supply
house or search online.

They have in-stock adapters to go from NPT pipe thread to 1/4" SAE
Flare (HVAC and Refrigeration charging hose fittings) 3/8" SAE Flare
(manifold to vacuum pump hose connection) and 1/2" Acme Flare (R-134a
Automotive Manifold hose fittings)

Your vacuum pump should have 1/4" SAE Flare and 3/8" SAE Flare
fittings if it was made for refrigeration work - you connect the
manifold hose with the 3/8 fitting, and can attach the micron vacuum
gauge to the 1/4" to monitor your progress.

(If the system under vacuum has an extra service port, connect the
vacuum gauge sensor directly to it. That way you can isolate the
system with a ball valve and shut off the vacuum pump, and monitor the
vacuum levels for leaks and/or trapped moisture still evaporating from
the refrigeration oil.

If you are adapting an industrial vacuum pump, you'll have to
bushing down from 3/4" NPT down to the threads needed for the adapter.

-- Bruce --
  #4  
Old June 15th 09, 05:59 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 1,393
Default R134a Thread size?

gary writes:

I plan on machining an adapter to get the 2 fittings connected
to each other.


Beware you don't commit an EPA felony. Such adapters are not government
approved.
  #5  
Old June 15th 09, 04:38 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 428
Default R134a Thread size?

On Sun, 14 Jun 2009 23:59:03 -0500, Richard J Kinch
wrote:

gary writes:

I plan on machining an adapter to get the 2 fittings connected
to each other.


Beware you don't commit an EPA felony. Such adapters are not government
approved.


What the (heck) are you talking about? They don't have to be
"government approved".

Unless they've made some serious changes since I took and passed the
test, there are no approvals processes or "lists of approved
machinery..." You just have to use procedures to reduce accidental or
incidental release of CFC's and HCFC's as much as possible. And
deliberate release is instant trouble.

A car using R-134a is running an HFC. No chlorine.

-- Bruce --
  #6  
Old June 16th 09, 08:40 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 1,393
Default R134a Thread size?

Bruce L. Bergman writes:

They don't have to be "government approved".


The EPA via the Clean Air Act regulates what fittings can be used with what
refrigerants. Not the marketplace, not engineering standards, not the
convenience or expedience of you or me or the OP. I don't agree with the
despotism of the government, I'm just warning you. The law makes us all
criminals, even for things like cutting metal. The tender mercies of the
bureaucrats decide who is punished and who is given lenience.
  #7  
Old June 17th 09, 06:54 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 428
Default R134a Thread size?

On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 02:40:58 -0500, Richard J Kinch
wrote:

Bruce L. Bergman writes:

They don't have to be "government approved".


The EPA via the Clean Air Act regulates what fittings can be used with what
refrigerants. Not the marketplace, not engineering standards, not the
convenience or expedience of you or me or the OP. I don't agree with the
despotism of the government, I'm just warning you. The law makes us all
criminals, even for things like cutting metal. The tender mercies of the
bureaucrats decide who is punished and who is given lenience.


The service fittings permanently installed on the vehicle or
stationary system, yes. If you do a conversion from R12 to R134a or
another refrigerant you have to change the fittings to the proper
style to avoid accidentally mixing refrigerants.

But not an adapter made so you can hook up your service manifold
hoses to the car or refrigerator being serviced, or hook up the hose
from your vacuum pump to your service manifold. They may be stupid
MF's working for the government, but they ain't THAT stupid.

It's the mouth breathing politicians who wrote the impossible to
follow laws the bureaucrats are trying to (selectively) enforce who
*are* that stupid. Which is why politicians are like diapers - they
need to be changed often, and for the same reasons.

-- Bruce --
  #8  
Old June 17th 09, 08:16 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 1,393
Default R134a Thread size?

Bruce L. Bergman writes:

But not an adapter ...


The EPA holds that if certain fittings are required, then adapters to
circumvent them are not permitted, since that defeats the very purpose of
the fittings, namely to make impossible the mixing or confusing of
refrigerants. While the utility of adapters is obvious, you're supposed to
have a separate set of gages and hoses for each refrigerant. That's the
governmental logic: intelligent economizing must give way to backstopping
presumed stupidity.

As Uncle Al sez, environmentalism is expensive, shoddy, and deadly.
  #9  
Old June 17th 09, 08:56 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 549
Default R134a Thread size?

Bruce L. Bergman wrote:
On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 02:40:58 -0500, Richard J Kinch
wrote:

Bruce L. Bergman writes:

They don't have to be "government approved".

The EPA via the Clean Air Act regulates what fittings can be used with what
refrigerants. Not the marketplace, not engineering standards, not the
convenience or expedience of you or me or the OP. I don't agree with the
despotism of the government, I'm just warning you. The law makes us all
criminals, even for things like cutting metal. The tender mercies of the
bureaucrats decide who is punished and who is given lenience.


The service fittings permanently installed on the vehicle or
stationary system, yes. If you do a conversion from R12 to R134a or
another refrigerant you have to change the fittings to the proper
style to avoid accidentally mixing refrigerants.

But not an adapter made so you can hook up your service manifold
hoses to the car or refrigerator being serviced, or hook up the hose
from your vacuum pump to your service manifold. They may be stupid
MF's working for the government, but they ain't THAT stupid.


Want to bet!


It's the mouth breathing politicians who wrote the impossible to
follow laws the bureaucrats are trying to (selectively) enforce who
*are* that stupid. Which is why politicians are like diapers - they
need to be changed often, and for the same reasons.

-- Bruce --


True, It is a shame that the Constitution was written by folks who felt
that serving in government was such a PIA that nobody would WANT to do
it. Term limits were not considered because of that.

I'd like to see term limits for ALL elected offices. Never going to
happen though.



--
Steve W.
  #10  
Old June 17th 09, 10:09 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 411
Default R134a Thread size?

Steve W. wrote:
Bruce L. Bergman wrote:
On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 02:40:58 -0500, Richard J Kinch
wrote:

Bruce L. Bergman writes:

They don't have to be "government approved".
The EPA via the Clean Air Act regulates what fittings can be used with what
refrigerants. Not the marketplace, not engineering standards, not the
convenience or expedience of you or me or the OP. I don't agree with the
despotism of the government, I'm just warning you. The law makes us all
criminals, even for things like cutting metal. The tender mercies of the
bureaucrats decide who is punished and who is given lenience.

The service fittings permanently installed on the vehicle or
stationary system, yes. If you do a conversion from R12 to R134a or
another refrigerant you have to change the fittings to the proper
style to avoid accidentally mixing refrigerants.

But not an adapter made so you can hook up your service manifold
hoses to the car or refrigerator being serviced, or hook up the hose
from your vacuum pump to your service manifold. They may be stupid
MF's working for the government, but they ain't THAT stupid.


Want to bet!

It's the mouth breathing politicians who wrote the impossible to
follow laws the bureaucrats are trying to (selectively) enforce who
*are* that stupid. Which is why politicians are like diapers - they
need to be changed often, and for the same reasons.

-- Bruce --


True, It is a shame that the Constitution was written by folks who felt
that serving in government was such a PIA that nobody would WANT to do
it. Term limits were not considered because of that.


The founders all had things to do, like managing a business.
Government duties detracted from that.

I sure wish the people in Washington DC had other things to do.
Idle hands truly are the devils workshop
 




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