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gable vent (bats!) - Attic ventilation



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 14th 04, 08:23 PM
Rich
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Default gable vent (bats!) - Attic ventilation

A few years ago, I found a small colony of bats living in the gable vent of
my house.
The bats could make their way into the attic through small holes where the
screen
was stapled to the wood vent.

After they left for the season, I took out the gable vent, attached
screening to the
outside, and made it impossible to get back in. This seems to have worked
fine.

I'm about to have my house vinyl sided and I'm thinking of having the gable
vent
closed up with plywood and siding over it. I really do want to deal with
bats
or other critters getting in.

My house is 12 years old. I have soffit vents, ridge vent, and a power temp
controlled
roof vent (I had that put in when I had central air installed).

Many/most of the similiar homes in my neighborhood do not have gable vents.
Does
it sound like I have adequate ventilation in the attic if I remove the gable
vent?
There is no gable vent on the opposite gable (chimney on that side).


Thanks


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  #2  
Old December 14th 04, 10:09 PM
m Ransley
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Default

You will not know if the venting was needed unless you do calculations
on what you need . Even then overventing is better. I hope you do not
run the power vent in winter or much in summer. They do pull up and out
conditioned air.

  #3  
Old December 14th 04, 10:35 PM
[email protected]
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Default

On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 15:09:49 -0600, (m Ransley)
wrote:

You will not know if the venting was needed unless you do calculations
on what you need . Even then overventing is better. I hope you do not
run the power vent in winter or much in summer. They do pull up and out
conditioned air.


this is usually the case when the fan is over sized for the attic
inlet air flow. But a very good point that should be known by anyone
that is thinking about installing an attic powered vent system.

later,

tom @
www.FreelancingProjects.com
  #4  
Old December 14th 04, 11:23 PM
Roger
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Default


The bats could make their way into the attic through small holes where the
screen
was stapled to the wood vent.

After they left for the season, I took out the gable vent, attached
screening to the
outside, and made it impossible to get back in. This seems to have worked
fine.

I'm about to have my house vinyl sided and I'm thinking of having the
gable
vent
closed up with plywood and siding over it. I really do want to deal with
bats
or other critters getting in.

My house is 12 years old. I have soffit vents, ridge vent, and a power
temp
controlled
roof vent (I had that put in when I had central air installed).

Many/most of the similiar homes in my neighborhood do not have gable
vents.
Does
it sound like I have adequate ventilation in the attic if I remove the
gable
vent?
There is no gable vent on the opposite gable (chimney on that side).


I would keep the gable vent. It is easy to keep varmits out of the attic,
but difficult to add a vent once you cover it.. A sturdy 1/4 inch galv.
screen hand-stapled to the interior is what you want. Don't use the tiny
staple gun staples, but the 3/4 - 1" galv. staples. If you have hot summers,
keep the vent, in any case.


  #5  
Old December 14th 04, 11:24 PM
Rich
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Default

The power vent only runs in the summer. I forget what I have the
thermostat set to, but it is pretty high.

Since I was one of the very few people in my neighborhood to
ask the builder to put the gable vent in in the first place
(heck...my dad has one...of course I want one!), I thought
that it may have been overkill in the first place. As you
mention, I'm sure it is better to overvent, I just don't want
to deal with bats again.


m Ransley wrote:
You will not know if the venting was needed unless you do calculations
on what you need . Even then overventing is better. I hope you do not
run the power vent in winter or much in summer. They do pull up and out
conditioned air.


  #6  
Old December 15th 04, 12:30 AM
willshak
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Default

On 12/14/2004 5:23 PM US(ET), Roger took fingers to keys, and typed the
following:

The bats could make their way into the attic through small holes where the
screen
was stapled to the wood vent.

After they left for the season, I took out the gable vent, attached
screening to the
outside, and made it impossible to get back in. This seems to have worked
fine.

I'm about to have my house vinyl sided and I'm thinking of having the
gable
vent
closed up with plywood and siding over it. I really do want to deal with
bats
or other critters getting in.

My house is 12 years old. I have soffit vents, ridge vent, and a power
temp
controlled
roof vent (I had that put in when I had central air installed).

Many/most of the similiar homes in my neighborhood do not have gable
vents.
Does
it sound like I have adequate ventilation in the attic if I remove the
gable
vent?
There is no gable vent on the opposite gable (chimney on that side).



I would keep the gable vent. It is easy to keep varmits out of the attic,
but difficult to add a vent once you cover it.. A sturdy 1/4 inch galv.
screen hand-stapled to the interior is what you want. Don't use the tiny
staple gun staples, but the 3/4 - 1" galv. staples. If you have hot summers,
keep the vent, in any case.

I didn't have bats, but I did have many paper wasp nests between the
louvers and standard window screen that was tacked to the 2x4 box frame
around the square vent. I wanted to keep flying insects from entering my
attic, but I had left too much room between the louvers and screen (3-1/2").
They didn't get in any further than the screen, but there were so many
nests that they might interfere with ventilation. I wanted to install a
thermostatically controlled power vent, so before installing it, I just
removed the screen and about 20 nests, and then moved the screen to lay
flush against the inside of the louvers, and secured it with pieces of
lath stapled to the sides of the 2x4s.
  #7  
Old December 15th 04, 01:37 AM
Rich
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Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks Roger,

The problem is, the gable vent is directly above my side door.
When the bats were up in the gable vent, the bat guano would
fall directly on the stairs to the side door. That is how
I found out about them in the first place. Your suggestion
would definitely keep them from entering the attic, but I
also need to keep them out of the front louvres all together.

From reading your post and others, it probably would be a
good idea to keep the vent and try to think of a creative
way of blocking there entrance.

Thanks.



Roger wrote:

The bats could make their way into the attic through small holes where the
screen
was stapled to the wood vent.

After they left for the season, I took out the gable vent, attached
screening to the
outside, and made it impossible to get back in. This seems to have worked
fine.

I'm about to have my house vinyl sided and I'm thinking of having the
gable
vent
closed up with plywood and siding over it. I really do want to deal with
bats
or other critters getting in.

My house is 12 years old. I have soffit vents, ridge vent, and a power
temp
controlled
roof vent (I had that put in when I had central air installed).

Many/most of the similiar homes in my neighborhood do not have gable
vents.
Does
it sound like I have adequate ventilation in the attic if I remove the
gable
vent?
There is no gable vent on the opposite gable (chimney on that side).



I would keep the gable vent. It is easy to keep varmits out of the attic,
but difficult to add a vent once you cover it.. A sturdy 1/4 inch galv.
screen hand-stapled to the interior is what you want. Don't use the tiny
staple gun staples, but the 3/4 - 1" galv. staples. If you have hot summers,
keep the vent, in any case.



  #8  
Old December 15th 04, 01:47 AM
Bell
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Posts: n/a
Default

Rich wrote:
Thanks Roger,

The problem is, the gable vent is directly above my side door.
When the bats were up in the gable vent, the bat guano would
fall directly on the stairs to the side door. That is how
I found out about them in the first place. Your suggestion
would definitely keep them from entering the attic, but I
also need to keep them out of the front louvres all together.

From reading your post and others, it probably would be a
good idea to keep the vent and try to think of a creative
way of blocking there entrance.

Thanks.


Build a belfry. You know that all bats prefer the belfry.


  #9  
Old December 15th 04, 03:40 PM
[email protected]
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Posts: n/a
Default

If you have a continuous ridge vent across the roof and good soffit
venting, there is no reason you can't eliminate the gable vent. In
fact, there is debate over whether having gable vents with ridge vents
actually makes things worse. Some are of the opinion that the gable
vents allow a short circuting effect, where air enters from the gable
and exits throught the ridge vent, rather than allowing air to
circulate all the way up from the soffit vents to better cool the
attic. Plus, if you calculate the square footage of the gable vent, it
should be small compared to the area of the ridge vent. And finally,
you have a power vent as backup, with of course, the same potential
short circuiting issue. I'd make sure the soffits are sufficient for
the rating of the fan to avoid sucking conditioned air out of the house.

  #10  
Old December 15th 04, 05:16 PM
Rich
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Posts: n/a
Default

You bring up a good point. I never thought about the short circuiting
affect. My central air installer recommend installing the power
vent on the roof (about 1/2 way up the side of the roof). Considering
I have a ridge vent, am I doing more harm than good by having
the power vent?

Thanks!



wrote in message
oups.com...
If you have a continuous ridge vent across the roof and good soffit
venting, there is no reason you can't eliminate the gable vent. In
fact, there is debate over whether having gable vents with ridge vents
actually makes things worse. Some are of the opinion that the gable
vents allow a short circuting effect, where air enters from the gable
and exits throught the ridge vent, rather than allowing air to
circulate all the way up from the soffit vents to better cool the
attic. Plus, if you calculate the square footage of the gable vent, it
should be small compared to the area of the ridge vent. And finally,
you have a power vent as backup, with of course, the same potential
short circuiting issue. I'd make sure the soffits are sufficient for
the rating of the fan to avoid sucking conditioned air out of the house.



 




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