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Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 1st 09, 03:24 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 289
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

I think this theory is incorrect. My GF is selling her mother's house
and is
reluctant to shut down the heat and drain the pipes over the winter.
(We live in the Northeast.) She was told by an "expert" that the
plaster will crack. I regularly shut my heat off for the winter at my
summer home, and have never had cracks in my plaster ceilings.
I'd like your comments. Obviously sudden temperature changes
might do it, but not one slow drop.
Thanks in advance for help.
Frank
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  #2  
Old November 1st 09, 04:29 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 4,938
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

On Oct 31, 10:24*pm, frank1492 wrote:
I think this theory is incorrect. My GF is selling her mother's house
and is
reluctant to shut down the heat and drain the pipes over the winter.
(We live in the Northeast.) She was told by an "expert" that the
plaster will crack. I regularly shut my heat off for the winter at my
summer home, and have never had cracks in my plaster ceilings.
* * * I'd like your comments. Obviously sudden temperature changes
might do it, but not one slow drop.
* * *Thanks in advance for help.
* * * * * Frank


I do it every year and am ok, If she isnt living there draining pipes
anyway is smart since heating systems do break, if its a boiler with
radiators depending on how pipes are run, it may ruin pipes by turning
down the system if boiler pipes are are close to exterior walls and
freeze on the coldest nights.
  #3  
Old November 1st 09, 05:40 AM posted to alt.home.repair
Joe
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Posts: 2,842
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

On Oct 31, 10:24*pm, frank1492 wrote:
I think this theory is incorrect. My GF is selling her mother's house
and is
reluctant to shut down the heat and drain the pipes over the winter.
(We live in the Northeast.) She was told by an "expert" that the
plaster will crack. I regularly shut my heat off for the winter at my
summer home, and have never had cracks in my plaster ceilings.
* * * I'd like your comments. Obviously sudden temperature changes
might do it, but not one slow drop.
* * *Thanks in advance for help.
* * * * * Frank


Some real estate sales folks are reluctant to show a cold house for
sale in the winter. It always makes a potential buyer suspicious that
a major problem exists in the heating system. The experts prefer a
cool, 55-60F house for a walk through. The client will stay longer and
take more interest in sizing up the property. IMO the plaster cracking
notion is bogus and the statement was made with some other intent than
being helpful; or perhaps just hearsay from some poor soul who
happened to live through such an experience in a very badly built
house.

Joe
  #4  
Old November 1st 09, 12:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,603
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

frank1492 wrote:

I think this theory is incorrect. My GF is selling her mother's house
and is
reluctant to shut down the heat and drain the pipes over the winter.
(We live in the Northeast.) She was told by an "expert" that the
plaster will crack. I regularly shut my heat off for the winter at my
summer home, and have never had cracks in my plaster ceilings.
I'd like your comments. Obviously sudden temperature changes
might do it, but not one slow drop.
Thanks in advance for help.


Freezing temps alone will not crack your plaster. BUT. . . .
No way would I shut the heat off in a house I was selling.

I want the most comfortable house for both agents and buyers to visit.
I *don't want little surprises when I turn the water back on- leaky
valves, busted pipes that didn't get drained, cracked toilet tanks.
The wonderful smell of 3 month old pee from someone peeing in a toilet
that wont flush.
A furnace that is now balking because it sat idle for so long.

By the time you pay a plumber to properly drain all those pipes- even
if nothing goes wrong- you can probably buy enough fuel to keep a
closed up house at 50 degrees or so.

I *would* suggest a remote readable thermostat that calls if the temp
drops to dangerous levels. I haven't ever researched them but my
B-I-L has one. He can call it an hour before he reaches the camp so
it is nice and toasty when he gets there. The cost will be
made up for in peace of mind and the 'wow' factor when she gives the
number to the realtor.

Jim
  #5  
Old November 1st 09, 12:18 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 6,205
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

On Nov 1, 7:07�am, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
frank1492 wrote:
I think this theory is incorrect. My GF is selling her mother's house
and is
reluctant to shut down the heat and drain the pipes over the winter.
(We live in the Northeast.) She was told by an "expert" that the
plaster will crack. I regularly shut my heat off for the winter at my
summer home, and have never had cracks in my plaster ceilings.
� � �I'd like your comments. Obviously sudden temperature changes
might do it, but not one slow drop.
� � Thanks in advance for help.


Freezing temps alone will not crack your plaster. � � BUT.. . . .
No way would I shut the heat off in a house I was selling.

I want the most comfortable house for both agents and buyers to visit.
I *don't want little surprises when I turn the water back on- leaky
valves, busted pipes that didn't get drained, cracked toilet tanks.
The wonderful smell of 3 month old pee from someone peeing in a toilet
that wont flush.
A furnace that is now balking because it sat idle for so long.

By the time you pay a plumber to properly drain all those pipes- even
if nothing goes wrong- you can probably buy enough fuel to keep a
closed up house at 50 degrees or so.

I *would* suggest a remote readable thermostat that calls if the temp
drops to dangerous levels. � �I haven't ever researched them but my
B-I-L has one. �He can call it an hour before he reaches �the camp so
it is nice and toasty when he gets there. � � � � The cost will be
made up for in peace of mind and the 'wow' factor when she gives the
number to the realtor.

Jim


I have personally seen plaster crack from expansion and contraction.
the old pittsburgh airport had a severe case of that after the heat
was bturned off in most areas. they had thought of turning the
building into a aircraft museum. one stumbling block was repairing
millions in cracked peeling plaster, it spalls and falls off.

made worse by colder temperatures combined with higher humidity when
heat is turned off.

moisture is trapped in plaster, when the moisture freezes it expands,
and plaster spalls.

I sold a vacant home years ago, kept it around 50 degrees, with light
that would flash if it got below 40, light was in window. neighbors
kept look out for flashing light.

i shut the main water valve so a leak couldnt flood anything.

a freezing house discourages shppers from spending time, which is
necessary for sale.

dont shut off heat.

owner might be better off to get a friend or realtive to live in home
for free, just pay utilities.

vacant homes are a major vandal arson target.

have they notified the homeowners insurance? it costs many times more
to insure a vacant home, and with heat off theres no way to claim
anyone was living there
  #6  
Old November 1st 09, 12:31 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,913
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

frank1492 wrote:
I think this theory is incorrect. My GF is selling her mother's house
and is
reluctant to shut down the heat and drain the pipes over the winter.
(We live in the Northeast.) She was told by an "expert" that the
plaster will crack. I regularly shut my heat off for the winter at my
summer home, and have never had cracks in my plaster ceilings.
I'd like your comments. Obviously sudden temperature changes
might do it, but not one slow drop.
Thanks in advance for help.
Frank


If she is interested in selling the house she needs to keep the heat on
to at least have the place warm for showing. Prospective buyers will
quickly turn their backs if they are shown it in deep freeze mode where
people will have chattering teeth and the florescent lights are blinking
like a horror show.
  #7  
Old November 1st 09, 12:59 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,603
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

" wrote:


-snip-
owner might be better off to get a friend or realtive to live in home
for free, just pay utilities.


Best plan of all if you can do it. Think post-grad or mature
college kid-- or a 20something that wants t leave momma's house.

Jim
  #8  
Old November 2nd 09, 01:11 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 962
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures


"George" wrote in message
...
frank1492 wrote:
I think this theory is incorrect. My GF is selling her mother's house
and is
reluctant to shut down the heat and drain the pipes over the winter.
(We live in the Northeast.) She was told by an "expert" that the
plaster will crack. I regularly shut my heat off for the winter at my
summer home, and have never had cracks in my plaster ceilings.
I'd like your comments. Obviously sudden temperature changes
might do it, but not one slow drop.
Thanks in advance for help.
Frank


If she is interested in selling the house she needs to keep the heat on to
at least have the place warm for showing. Prospective buyers will quickly
turn their backs if they are shown it in deep freeze mode where people
will have chattering teeth and the florescent lights are blinking like a
horror show.


The freezing shouldn't hurt the plaster per say BUT the moisture isn't good
for alot of things including the plaster , especially if it is already
bad..In the NE winters tend to be cold and WET....Nothing smells worse than
an cold damp musty house...Not good for the wallpaper or paint either ....

  #9  
Old November 2nd 09, 03:01 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 154
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

I agree - moisture and condensation would be more of a concern for me in
this situation than the risk of cracks.


"benick" wrote in message
news

"George" wrote in message
...
frank1492 wrote:
I think this theory is incorrect. My GF is selling her mother's house
and is
reluctant to shut down the heat and drain the pipes over the winter.
(We live in the Northeast.) She was told by an "expert" that the
plaster will crack. I regularly shut my heat off for the winter at my
summer home, and have never had cracks in my plaster ceilings.
I'd like your comments. Obviously sudden temperature changes
might do it, but not one slow drop.
Thanks in advance for help.
Frank


If she is interested in selling the house she needs to keep the heat on
to at least have the place warm for showing. Prospective buyers will
quickly turn their backs if they are shown it in deep freeze mode where
people will have chattering teeth and the florescent lights are blinking
like a horror show.


The freezing shouldn't hurt the plaster per say BUT the moisture isn't
good for alot of things including the plaster , especially if it is
already bad..In the NE winters tend to be cold and WET....Nothing smells
worse than an cold damp musty house...Not good for the wallpaper or paint
either ....


  #10  
Old November 2nd 09, 08:15 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,179
Default Cracks in Plaster Due to Very Cold Temperatures

Mark wrote:
I agree - moisture and condensation would be more of a concern for me
in this situation than the risk of cracks.


Can cracks be caused by the house structure expanding due to moisture in an
unheated house?


 




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